•  39
    A Nietzche Round-up
    Philosophical Quarterly 48 (191): 235-242. 1998.
  •  35
    Nietzsche on Language: Before and After Wittgenstein
    with Maria Alvarez
    Philosophical Topics 33 (2): 1-17. 2005.
  •  33
    Collingwood's commitments: A reply to Hausman and Dilworth
    Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (4): 396-398. 1998.
  •  31
    Nietzsche, Nature, Nurture
    European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1): 129-143. 2017.
    Nietzsche claims that we are fated to be as we are. He also claims, however, that we can create ourselves. To many commentators these twin commitments have seemed self-contradictory or paradoxical. The argument of this paper, by contrast, is that, despite appearances, there is no paradox here, nor even a tension between Nietzsche's two claims. Instead, when properly interpreted these claims turn out to be intimately related to one another, so that our fatedness emerges as integral to our capacit…Read more
  •  29
    F.H. Bradley: Relations and Regresses
    Bradley Studies 1 (2): 107-115. 1995.
    The speed with which Bradley became an historical backwater has probably made it easier to think of him as a second-rate philosopher, who was either incompetent or careless, or at any rate uninteresting, and to suppose that his arguments have been refuted as well as rejected. But as far as his metaphysics are concerned this is not the case. His project and his premises are not those of contemporary analytic philosophy, but his arguments are none the less rigorous for that; and attempts to convic…Read more
  •  27
    Nietzsche and the Arts of Life
    In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche, Oxford University Press. 2013.
    This article focuses on how aesthetic values permeate Nietzsche’s philosophy. Artistry is not confined to the creation of conventional works of art but occurs in the form-giving that is essential to all human forms of life. Since Nietzsche was committed to the view that the world is in some basic sense chaotic and meaningless, he held that only by imposing forms can we create a cognizable world. This close association between the conditions of life itself and the aesthetic activity of giving for…Read more
  •  27
    Presenting some of Nietzsche's most significant thoughts on art and literature, this enthralling account traces the development of his thinking throughout his ...
  •  26
    Congratulations, it's a tragedy: Collingwood's remarks on genre
    British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (1): 52-63. 2002.
    This essay argues that R.G. Collingwood's remarks about genre are implausible, and that they stem, despite their apparent origin in his wider account of art, from his failure to take some of his own most important insights seriously enough. Some possible reasons for that failure are suggested; and it is shown that, once the relevant insights are given their proper weight, Collingwood's account commands the resources from which a plausible story about genre might have been constructed. To this ex…Read more
  •  26
    Brilliant Performances
    Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 71 209-227. 2012.
    I am generally unsympathetic to the project, pursued by many recent philosophers of music, of attempting to specify the identity conditions for musical works – of attempting to specify the conditions that something, typically a performance, must satisfy if it is to count as an instance of this or that work. Call this the identity-project. Elsewhere, I have suggested that any such project is fundamentally misconceived. Here, however, I want simply to explore a couple of the difficulties with whic…Read more
  •  15
    On the Musically Possible
    British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (1): 1-14. 2014.
    It seems natural to suppose that Artur Schnabel’s occasionally inaccurate performance of Beethoven’s Hammerklavier would have been even better had it been accurate throughout. In the present paper I defend this supposition against a sceptical argument which purports to show that we have no good reason to believe it. The sceptical argument, which draws on some plausible-seeming thoughts about aesthetic properties, concludes that, because we cannot know whether this or that (as-yet-unachieved) mus…Read more
  •  15
    Review: Ancillary Thoughts on an Ancillary Text (review)
    Journal of Nietzsche Studies. forthcoming.
  •  14
    Discussion of the relations between ethics and aesthetics has tended to focus on issues concerning judgement: for example, philosophers have often asked whether, or to what extent, ethical considerations of one sort or another should inform aesthetic verdicts. Much less discussed, however, have been the relations between these two domains in their practical aspects. In this paper, I try to defuse a cluster of reasons for believing that practical competence in the ethical domain and practical com…Read more
  •  13
    II–Aaron Ridley
    Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1): 163-176. 1997.
  •  12
    Still an Error: Relational Theories of Art
    with Alex Neill
    British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2): 187-189. 2016.
    Aaron Meskin and Simon Fokt have recently taken issue with our 2012 paper, ‘Relational Theories of Art: the History of an Error’. Here we respond to their objections.
  •  12
    Nietzsche is one of the most important modern philosophers and his writings on the nature of art are amongst the most influential of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This_ GuideBook _introduces and assesses: Nietzsche's life and the background to his writings on art the ideas and texts of his works which contribute to art, including _The_ _Birth of Tragedy_, _Human, All Too Human_ and _Thus Spoke Zarathustra_ Nietzsche's continuing importance to philosophy and contemporary thought. This _…Read more
  •  11
    Nietzsche on Tragedy: First and Last Thoughts
    The Monist 102 (3): 316-330. 2019.
    Nietzsche is often said to have started out as a Schopenhauerian metaphysician of some kind before leaving Schopenhauer behind him, and, by the end of his sane life, metaphysics too. His first and last thoughts about tragedy, however, sit uneasily with this narrative. The late thoughts are simply too close to the early ones for the story to accommodate them—not for their Schopenhauerianism, but for the strongly metaphysical flavour that they appear to share. The argument of the present paper is …Read more
  •  10
    F.H. Bradley: Relations and Regresses
    Bradley Studies 1 (2): 107-115. 1995.
    The speed with which Bradley became an historical backwater has probably made it easier to think of him as a second-rate philosopher, who was either incompetent or careless, or at any rate uninteresting, and to suppose that his arguments have been refuted as well as rejected. But as far as his metaphysics are concerned this is not the case. His project and his premises are not those of contemporary analytic philosophy, but his arguments are none the less rigorous for that; and attempts to convic…Read more
  •  9
    Desire in the Experience of Fiction
    Philosophy and Literature 16 (2): 279-291. 1992.
  •  8
    Review: A Nietzsche Round-Up (review)
    Philosophical Quarterly 48 (191). 1998.
  •  8
    Of Mind and Music
    Mind 110 (438): 423-427. 2001.
  •  7
    Kristin Thompson, Breaking the Glass Armor: Neoformalist Film Analysis Reviewed by
    with Alex Neill
    Philosophy in Review 10 (9): 345-351. 1990.
  •  7
    Emotion and Feeling: Aaron Ridley
    Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 71 (1): 163-176. 1997.
  •  5
    Tragedy
    In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics, Oxford University Press. 2003.
  •  5
    Nietzsche on Art and Freedom
    European Journal of Philosophy 15 (2): 204-224. 2007.
    There are passages in Nietzsche that can be read as contributions to the free will/determinism debate. When read in that way, they reveal a fairly amateurish metaphysician with little of real substance or novelty to contribute; and if these readings were apt or perspicuous, it seems to me, they would show that Nietzsche's thoughts about freedom were barely worth pausing over. They would simply confirm the impression—amply bolstered from other quarters—that Nietzsche was not at his best when addr…Read more
  •  4
    Vi *—nietzsche and the re-evaluation of values
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (2): 171-191. 2005.