•  7
    It is not the case that God is interestingly like the unavailable transcendental signified in being unavailable. God always was absconded. The signified may not even really have gone away at all. And if it has, it is not God; it is only like Him in having gone away. And it has gone away, if it has, in a different mode of ‘going away’.To use a Turneresque metaphor: God is and will always be another, far, range behind the misty-but-glittering and absconded signifieds, which leave only the trace wh…Read more
  • Flowers as 'Free Beauties of Nature'
    Literature & Aesthetics 4 17-30. 1994.
  • McCloskey, M. A.: "Kant's Aesthetic" (review)
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (n/a): 467. 1990.
  •  29
    Hazel Rowley: Obituary
    Sophia 50 (2): 313-313. 2011.
  • Reflections and Boredom and the Sublime
    Literature & Aesthetics 5 104-122. 1995.
  •  29
    The paper concludes the argument that certain aesthetic objects conduce to a feeling of radical contingency, and to an openness to St Thomas's Third Way proof for the existence of God. Much is conceded to the late Mr Gershon Weiler's criticism of an earlier discussion. The upshot is (a) that Necessary Being as converse of radical contingency may be an Aesthetic Idea/Sublime of Kant's kind, and (b) that without the ‘I AM that I am’, it is empty. The ‘inference’ from radical contingency to Necessa…Read more
  •  6
    In Memoriam: Maxwell John Charlesworth
    Sophia 53 (4): 425-426. 2014.
    Maxwell John Charlesworth, cofounder with Graeme E. de Graaff, of Sophia , died suddenly and peacefully at home on the second of June 2014. Born on the thirtieth of December 1925 in Numurkah, Victoria, Max took his MA in Philosophy at the University of Melbourne in 1948. At that time, the Melbourne Department of Philosophy was the preeminent school in Australasia. He married Stephanie Armstrong in 1950. Between 1950 and 1952, he was hospitalized for TB. On his recovery, he studied—1953–1955—at t…Read more
  •  11
    A review of Peter Steele’s: The Whispering Gallery: Art into Poetry, in which Steele writes poems on and to paintings and the sculpture Black Sun in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. Each work on which there is a poem is reproduced. In this book Steele writes more to the ‘contour’ of the topic-work than he did in Plenty. His poems – as ever sidenoted – are tensed between the topicality of the work of art in question, and Kant’s aesthetic which involves ‘the free play of the…Read more
  •  12
    Christ’s name is often taken in vain, but not in this book title. It is at once a prayer and a cry of anguish. Robinson was deputed to deal with the whole abuse problem in the Archdiocese of Sydney and knows horrid things at first hand: abuse and clerical cover-ups, both.Bishop Robinson’s book is practical—if perhaps at the time of publication unduly sanguine. He calls, in chapter 13 for ‘A New Council for a New Church’ to enable to get the problem of sexual abuse fixed and for the Church to get…Read more
  •  25
    Postlude: Panentheism (review)
    Sophia 49 (2): 297-300. 2010.
  •  25
    Listening to pictures
    Sophia 46 (2): 193-198. 2007.
    A review of Peter Steele’s: The Whispering Gallery: Art into Poetry, in which Steele writes poems on and to paintings and the sculpture Black Sun (By Inge King) in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. Each work on which there is a poem is reproduced. In this book Steele writes more to the ‘contour’ of the topic-work than he did in Plenty. His poems – as ever sidenoted – are tensed between the topicality of the work of art in question, and Kant’s aesthetic which involves ‘the f…Read more
  •  30
    Hans Küng is a well-known, and harsh, critic of doctrine of papal infallibility declared at Vatican I, 1870–1871. It leads—he argues—not to transparent certainty, but away from it. A propos ‘infallibility’ and the still-running scandals of child sexual abuse by members of the Catholic clergy, he writes:…While Rome no longer dares to proclaim formally infallible doctrines, it still envelopes all of its doctrinal pronouncements with an aura of infallibility, as though the Pope’s words were a direc…Read more
  • Book Review (review)
    Literature & Aesthetics 9 212-215. 1999.
  •  30
    He’s a terrible fellow, but at least he’s got substance.—Erich Auerbach on HeideggerMy esteemed colleague Purushottama Bilimoria drew my attention to Shane Mackinlay’s ‘Heidegger’s Temple: How Truth Happens when Nothing is Portrayed’. My friend wondered whether my piece on ‘The Origin of the Work of Art: Heidegger’ in Sophia 51, no.4 (2012): 465–478 was a reply to Mackinlay. It was not.I had not in fact read Shane Mackinlay’s elegant essay. Having read it now, I do not entirely agree with it: No…Read more
  • Book Review (review)
    Literature & Aesthetics 11 169-175. 2001.
  •  35
    Book reviews (review)
    with Joseph A. Bulbulia, Kristen Kingfield Kearns, Ilsup Ahn, Peter Forrest, Stephen R. Napier, and Graeme Marshall
    Sophia 42 (1): 125-126. 2003.
    Book Review. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2014.929720
  •  32
    Antonello da Messina’s Annunciation with the Blessèd Virgin sola breaks with iconic convention, so inviting new interpretations of the theme. The Rome exhibition of 2006 allowed one to compare Antonello with van Eyck: Antonello seemed pre-modern. This review discusses three important essays on the Annunciation. All three perceptive essays raise theological and phenomenological issues directly related to the almost unique iconic representation which Antonello gives us.
  • Book Review (review)
    Literature and Aesthetics 9 212-215. 1999.
  •  2
    Australian Aboriginal Art
    Literature & Aesthetics 15 (1): 175-194. 2005.
  •  3
    Book reviews (review)
    with Kevin Hart, Thomas A. Forsthoefel, Christopher Key Chapple, John Bryant, and L. A. Kemmerer
    Sophia 41 (2): 87-111. 2002.
  • Editorial
    Sophia 34 (2): 3-4. 1995.