•  97
    Views of Addiction Neuroscientists and Clinicians on the Clinical Impact of a 'Brain Disease Model of Addiction'
    with Stephanie Bell, Rebecca Mathews, Coral Gartner, Jayne Lucke, and Wayne Hall
    Neuroethics 7 (1): 19-27. 2014.
    Addiction is increasingly described as a “chronic and relapsing brain disease”. The potential impact of the brain disease model on the treatment of addiction or addicted individuals’ treatment behaviour remains uncertain. We conducted a qualitative study to examine: (i) the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians accept the brain disease view of addiction; and (ii) their views on the likely impacts of this view on addicted individuals’ beliefs and behaviour. T…Read more
  •  97
    Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation
    with Emily Bell, Eric Racine, and Wayne Hall
    Neuroethics 4 (2): 129-142. 2011.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests t…Read more
  •  77
    Impaired control over drug use is a defining characteristic of addiction in the major diagnostic systems. However there is significant debate about the extent of this impairment. This qualitative study examines the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians believe that addicted individuals have control over their drug use and are responsible for their behaviour. One hour semi-structured interviews were conducted during 2009 and 2010 with 31 Australian addiction …Read more
  •  71
    The authors comments on several articles on addiction. Research suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The authors maintain that a proper study of addiction must include a neurobiological model of addiction to draw the attention of bioethicists and addiction neurobiologists. They also state that more addiction neuroscientists like S. E. Hyman are needed as they understand the limits of their research. Accession Number: 24077921; Authors:…Read more
  •  65
    Drug-Induced Impulse Control Disorders: A Prospectus for Neuroethical Analysis
    with Polly Ambermoon and Wayne D. Hall
    Neuroethics 4 (2): 91-102. 2011.
    There is growing evidence that dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) used to treat Parkinson’s Disease can cause compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying and hypersexuality. Like more familiar drug-based forms of addiction, these iatrogenic disorders can cause significant harm and distress for sufferers and their families. In some cases, people treated with DRT have lost their homes and businesses, or have been prosecuted for crimi…Read more
  •  38
    Addiction and autonomy: What can neuroscience tell us
    with W. Hall
    11th Annual Conference of the Australasian Bioethics Association. forthcoming.
  •  37
    Lewis’ neurodevelopmental model provides a plausible alternative to the brain disease model of addiction that is a dominant perspective in the USA. We disagree with Lewis’ claim that the BDMA is unchallenged within the addiction field but we agree that it provides unduly pessimistic prospects of recovery. We question the strength of evidence for the BDMA provided by animal models and human neuroimaging studies. We endorse Lewis’ framing of addiction as a developmental process underpinned by reve…Read more
  •  37
    Public Understandings of Addiction: Where do Neurobiological Explanations Fit?
    with Carla Meurk, Wayne Hall, and Jayne Lucke
    Neuroethics 7 (1): 51-62. 2014.
    Developments in the field of neuroscience, according to its proponents, offer the prospect of an enhanced understanding and treatment of addicted persons. Consequently, its advocates consider that improving public understanding of addiction neuroscience is a desirable aim. Those critical of neuroscientific approaches, however, charge that it is a totalising, reductive perspective–one that ignores other known causes in favour of neurobiological explanations. Sociologist Nikolas Rose has argued th…Read more
  •  22
    Avoiding Selective Ethical Objections to Nudges
    with Wayne Hall
    American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2): 12-14. 2012.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 12-14, February 2012
  •  19
    An Ethical Reevaluation: Where Are the Voices of Those With Anorexia Nervosa and Their Families?
    with Anthony Barnett and Wayne Hall
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4): 73-74. 2015.
  •  17
    Ethical Guidelines for Genetic Research on Alcohol Addiction and Its Applications
    with Audrey R. Chapman, Jonathan M. Kaplan, Kylie Morphett, and Wayne Hall
    Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (1): 1-22. 2018.
    The misuse of alcohol inflicts a major toll on individual users, their families, and the wider society. This includes disruptions of family life, violence, absenteeism and problems in the workplace, child neglect and abuse, and excess morbidity and mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that alcohol ranks eighth among global risk factors for death and is the third leading global risk factor for disease and disability. In the United States, alcohol dependence affects four to five perc…Read more
  •  17
    Standing at the Precipice: A Cautionary Note About Incremental Goods
    with Benjamin Capps
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3): 46-48. 2010.
  •  16
    ‘Woe Betides Anybody Who Tries to Turn me Down.’ A Qualitative Analysis of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms Following Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease
    with Philip E. Mosley, Katherine Robinson, Terry Coyne, Peter Silburn, and Michael Breakspear
    Neuroethics 14 (1): 47-63. 2021.
    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease can lead to the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms. These can include harmful changes in mood and behaviour that alienate family members and raise ethical questions about personal responsibility for actions committed under stimulation-dependent mental states. Qualitative interviews were conducted with twenty participants following subthalamic DBS at a movement disorders centre, in order to explore th…Read more
  •  16
    Scare-Mongering and the Anticipatory Ethics of Experimental Technologies
    with Perry Bartlett and Wayne Hall
    American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5): 47-48. 2009.
  •  15
    Advancing Medicine Ethically: Important Considerations for Innovative Practice
    with Sarah Haines and Michael Savic
    American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6): 38-40. 2019.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page 38-40.
  •  14
    No abstract
  •  13
    Curing Psychopathy: Just Activate the Amygdala?
    with Andrew Dawson and Rebecca A. Segrave
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (3): 164-166. 2016.
  •  10
    Patients’ Weighing of the Long-Term Risks and Consequences Associated With Deep Brain Stimulation in Treatment-Resistant Depression
    with Cassandra Thomson, Rebecca Segrave, and John Gardner
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (4): 243-245. 2018.
  •  10
  •  8
    Managing Suicide Risk in Experimental Treatments of Treatment-Resistant Depression
    with Wayne Hall
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1): 38-39. 2013.
  •  8
    Changes in Personality Associated with Deep Brain Stimulation: a Qualitative Evaluation of Clinician Perspectives
    with Cassandra J. Thomson and Rebecca A. Segrave
    Neuroethics 14 (Suppl 1): 109-124. 2019.
    Gilbert et al. argue that the neuroethics literature discussing the putative effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on personality largely ignores the scientific evidence and presents distorted claims that personality change is induced by the DBS stimulation. This study contributes to the first-hand primary research on the topic exploring DBS clinicians’ views on post-DBS personality change among their patients and its underlying cause. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with sixteen clinician…Read more
  •  8
    Informed Consent and Voluntariness: Balancing Ethical Demands During Trial Recruitment
    with Cassandra J. Thomson and Rebecca A. Segrave
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (1): 83-85. 2021.
  •  7
    Of Meatballs And Invasive Neurotechnological Trials: Additional Considerations for Complex Clinical Decisions
    with John Noel M. Viaña and Frederic Gilbert
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (2): 100-104. 2018.
  •  7
    Beyond the Right to Injectable Heroin
    with Wayne Hall
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (1): 48-49. 2010.
  •  6
    Drug Legalization is Not a Masterstroke for Addressing Racial Inequality
    with Wayne Hall
    American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4): 44-46. 2021.
    Brian Earp and colleagues argue that the major harms associated with the use of illicit drugs largely arise from, or are at least exacerbated by, the fact that their use attracts criminal pe...
  •  5
    Changes in Personality Associated with Deep Brain Stimulation: a Qualitative Evaluation of Clinician Perspectives
    with Cassandra J. Thomson and Rebecca A. Segrave
    Neuroethics 14 (1): 109-124. 2021.
    Gilbert et al. argue that the neuroethics literature discussing the putative effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on personality largely ignores the scientific evidence and presents distorted claims that personality change is induced by the DBS stimulation. This study contributes to the first-hand primary research on the topic exploring DBS clinicians’ views on post-DBS personality change among their patients and its underlying cause. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with sixteen clinician…Read more
  •  4
    The Coercive Potential of Digital Mental Health
    with Isobel Butorac
    American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7): 28-30. 2021.
    Digital mental health can be understood as the in situ quantification of an individual’s data from personal devices to measure human behavior in both health and disease (Huckvale, Venkatesh and Chr...