•  42
  •  28
    Descartes’s Secular Semantics
    with David Hausman
    Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1). 1992.
    … if we bear well in mind the scope of our senses and what it is exactly that reaches our faculty of thinking by way of them, we must admit that in no case are the ideas of things presented to us by the senses just as we form them in our thinking. So much so that there is nothing in our ideas which is not innate to the mind or the faculty of thinking, with the sole exception of those circumstances which relate to experience, such as the fact that we judge that this or that idea which we now have…Read more
  •  26
    Is everything a class?
    with Tom Foster
    Philosophical Studies 32 (4). 1977.
  •  25
    When Keats identified truth and beauty, he surely intended mere extensionality. I myself have never had much trouble with either half of the equivalence. Others have considerable difficulty. A case in point is the Watson-Allaire-Cummins interpretation of Berkeley's idealism, which I shall refer to henceforth as the inherence account. That account is put forward to answer an extremely perplexing question in the history of philosophy: Why did Berkeley embrace idealism, i.e., why did he hold that e…Read more
  •  22
    Descartes' Dualism (review)
    with David B. Hausman
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2): 318-320. 1998.
    318 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 36:2 APRIL 1998 stress should not be placed on Spinoza's excommunication . One among many who held radical views and during a period of unrest brought on by an influx of emigration, Spinoza was dealt the same punishment as those who failed to pay their communal dues. The apt conclusion drawn is that from the perspective of the commu- nity, this excommunication was of no great significance. Such history corrects earlier interpretations and helps readers to…Read more
  •  16
    Berkeley's Semantic Dilemma: Beyond the Inherence Model
    with David Hausman
    History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2). 1996.
  •  14
  •  13
    IV. Strawson on the traditional logic
    Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 12 (1-4): 254-259. 1969.
    In his Introduction to Logical Theory, Strawson argues that Aristotelian logic can be given a successful interpretation into ordinary English, but not into the symbolism of Principia Mathematica, on the grounds that Aristotelian logic and ordinary English share something absent in PM, namely, the doctrine of presupposition. It is argued that Strawson is mistaken. PM does justice to the logical rules of Aristotelian logic and also has a fully articulated doctrine of presupposition
  •  13
    Identifying identity
    with James S. Kelly
    Erkenntnis 25 (3). 1986.
    Nelson Goodman argues against those who, like Carnap, claim extensional identity is the criterion for correct constructional definition. Goodman argues that internal logical difficulties sink such a criterion, thus he proposes his own criterion of extensional isomorphism. We argue that Goodman's criterion itself falls prey to his own arguments or else extensional identity is not shown faulty
  •  13
  •  12
    Cartwright, classes, and criterial difference
    with Tom Foster
    Noûs 12 (3): 329-336. 1978.
  •  10
    A New Approach to Berkeley's Ideal Reality
    with David Hausman
    In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays, The Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 65-78. 1995.
  •  10
    Logic and Philosophy: A Modern Introduction
    Wadsworth, Cengage Learning. 2013.
    As the title suggests, this is a book devoted not merely to logic; students will also examine the philosophical debates that led to the development of the field.
  •  10
    Frontmatter
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. 1997.
  •  10
    5. A New Approach to Berkeley's Ideal Reality
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 65-78. 1995.
  •  7
    Howard Kahane, 1928-2001
    with Charles Landesman and Roger Seamon
    Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 75 (5). 2002.
  •  6
    Carnap and Goodman: Two Formalists
    with Fred Wilson
    Philosophy of Science 36 (3): 327-330. 1969.
  •  5
    Notes
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 117-138. 1997.
  •  5
    Descartes’s Secular Semantics
    with David Hausman
    Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1): 81-104. 1992.
    … if we bear well in mind the scope of our senses and what it is exactly that reaches our faculty of thinking by way of them, we must admit that in no case are the ideas of things presented to us by the senses just as we form them in our thinking. So much so that there is nothing in our ideas which is not innate to the mind or the faculty of thinking, with the sole exception of those circumstances which relate to experience, such as the fact that we judge that this or that idea which we now have…Read more
  •  5
    Epilogue
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 112-116. 1997.
  •  5
    Contents
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. 1997.
  •  5
    6. Hume's Use of Illicit Substances
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 79-98. 1997.
  •  4
    2. Descartes's Semantic Intentions
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 13-28. 1997.
  •  4
    3. The Secularity of the Meditations
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 29-47. 1997.
  •  4
    Acknowledgments
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. 1997.
  •  3
    1. Machines, Meaning, and the Theory of Ideas
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 1-12. 1997.
  •  3
    Name Index
    with David Hausman
    In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 143-144. 1997.