• University of Toledo
    Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies
    Other faculty (Postdoc, Visiting, etc)
Pennsylvania State University
Department of Philosophy
PhD, 2000
Toledo, Ohio, United States of America
  •  1
    Teratology and Truth: Socrates' Investigation of Poetic Names in the "Cratylus"
    Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University. 2001.
    This dissertation explores the emergence of the textual discipline of etymology in order to demonstrate its difference from earlier investigations of names---particularly those of Socrates in Plato's Cratylus , and to suggest the implications that this difference has for thinking about truth. My project is motivated by a two-fold observation: the historical fact that etymology was not established until several centuries after Plato wrote the Cratylus and that it emerges from within a political a…Read more
  •  14
    Socrates in Drag: Images of Helen of Troy in Plato’s Phaedrus
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1): 77-93. 2009.
    By way of the complex topography of the Phaedrus, Plato raises the question of his authorship and the consequences it has for the reader’s reception of Socrates, by likening Socrates’ changing status in the text to the complex mythological traditions surrounding the rape and abduction of Helen of Troy. As Socrates is likened to the excessive and “duplicitous” Helen and her various “eidolic” apeareances, the question of the dialogue appears to shift from “who is Socrates?” to a more postmodern fo…Read more
  •  35
    Socrates in Drag: Images of Helen of Troy in Plato’s Phaedrus
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1): 77-93. 2009.
    By way of the complex topography of the Phaedrus, Plato raises the question of his authorship and the consequences it has for the reader’s reception of Socrates, by likening Socrates’ changing status in the text to the complex mythological traditions surrounding the rape and abduction of Helen of Troy (amidst a grove of plane trees). As Socrates is likened to the excessive and “duplicitous” Helen and her various “eidolic” apeareances, the question of the dialogue appears to shift from “who is So…Read more