•  982
    Online collection of papers by Devitt, Dretske, Guarino, Hochberg, Jackson, Petitot, Searle, Tye, Varzi and other leading thinkers on philosophy and the foundations of cognitive Science. Topics dealt with include: Wittgenstein and Cognitive Science, Content and Object, Logic and Foundations, Language and Linguistics, and Ontology and Mereology.
  •  716
    On Knowing One's Own Language
    In Crispin Wright, Barry C. Smith & Cynthia Macdonald (eds.), Knowing Our Own Minds, Oxford University Press. pp. 391--428. 1998.
    We rely on language to know the minds of others, but does language have a role to play in knowing our own minds? To suppose it does is to look for a connection between mastery of a language and the epistemic relation we bear to our inner lives. What could such a connection consist in? To explore this, I shall examine strategies for explaining self-knowledge in terms of the use we make of language to express and report our mental states. Success in these strategies will depend on the view we take…Read more
  •  647
    Relativism and Predicates of Personal Taste
    In Francois Recanati, Isidora Stojanovic & Neftali Villanueva (eds.), Context-depenece, Perspective and Relativity, De Gruyer Mouton. 2010.
  •  554
    Why We Still Need Knowledge of Language
    Croatian Journal of Philosophy 6 (3): 431-456. 2006.
    In his latest book, Michael Devitt rejects Chomsky’s mentalist conception of linguistics. The case against Chomsky is based on two principal claims. First, that we can separate the study of linguistic competence from the study of its outputs: only the latter belongs to linguistic inquiry. Second, Chomsky’s account of a speaker’s competence as consisiting in the mental representation of rules of a grammar for his language is mistaken. I shall argue, first, that Devitt fails to make a case for sep…Read more
  •  533
    The Oxford Handbook to the Philosophy of Language (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2006.
    The Oxford Handbooks series is a major new initiative in academic publishing. Each volume offers an authoritative and up-to-date survey of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned essays from leading figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates. Oxford Handbooks provide scholars and graduate students with compelling new perspectives upon a wide range of subjects in the humanities and social sciences. Ernie Lepore …Read more
  •  489
    What Remains of Our Knowledge of Language?: Reply to Collins
    Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (22): 557-75. 2008.
    The new Chomskian orthodoxy denies that our linguistic competence gives us knowledge *of* a language, and that the representations in the language faculty are representations *of* anything. In reply, I have argued that through their intuitions speaker/hearers, (but not their language faculties) have knowledge of language, though not of any externally existing language. In order to count as knowledge, these intuitions must track linguistic facts represented in the language faculty. I defend this …Read more
  •  262
    The critic Cyril Connolly once pointed out that diarists don’t make novelists. He went on to describe the problem for the would-be writer. “Writing for oneself: no public. Writing for others: no privacy” (Cyril Connolly, Journal). This paper addresses Connolly's worry about the public ad private: how can we reconcile the inner and conscious dimension of speech with its outer and public dimension? For if what people mean by their words involves, or consists in, what they have in mind when they sp…Read more
  •  254
    The Chemical Senses
    In Mohan Matthen (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Philosophy of Perception. pp. 314-353. 2015.
    Long-standing neglect of the chemical senses in the philosophy of perception is due, mostly, to their being regarded as ‘lower’ senses. Smell, taste, and chemically irritated touch are thought to produce mere bodily sensations. However, empirically informed theories of perception can show how these senses lead to perception of objective properties, and why they cannot be treated as special cases of perception modelled on vision. The senses of taste, touch, and smell also combine to create unifie…Read more
  •  242
    In uttering a sentence we are often take to assert more than its literal meaning - though sometimes we assert less. This phenomenon is taken by many to show that what is said or asserted by a speaker on an occasion is a contextually enriched or developed version of the semantic content of the words uttered. I argue that we can resist this conclusion by recognizing that what we think we are asserting, or take others to assert, involves selective attention to just one of the ways a sentence could …Read more
  •  167
    Consciousness: An inner view of the outer world
    Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (7-8): 175-86. 2006.
    Right now my conscious experience is directed at part of the world. It takes in some aspects of things around me and not others. Some bits of the world occupy my attention, other worldly goings on condition or colour the character of my current perceptual experience. I experience buildings in view through the window, the clothes in the corner of the room, the colour of the walls, the plate with breads, the coffee mugs, the smell of fresh laundry, the muffled sounds of someone in the kitchen, the…Read more
  •  100
    Understanding Language
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 92. 1992.
  •  86
    In Vino Veritas
    with Tim Crane
    The Philosophers' Magazine 39 (39): 75-78. 2007.
  •  49
    Can we say more about factual discourse?
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2). 2007.
  •  43
    What Does Metacognition Do For Us?
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (3): 727-735. 2014.
  •  29
    Frege and Chomsky: Sense and Psychologism
    In Petr Kotatko & John Biro (eds.), Frege: Sense and Reference One Hundred Years Later, Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 25--46. 1995.
  •  26
    Relativism about Truth and Predicates of Taste
    Filosofia Unisinos 13 (2 - suppl.). 2012.
  •  20
    Empathie et perception des valeurs
    Dialogue 51 (1): 119-127. 2012.
    ABSTRACT: Differences of evaluative judgments are often assumed to be a reason to prefer pluralism, relativism or subjectivism to objectivism, and this preference is even more pronounced in the case of judgements of taste. A comparison between perceptual and moral disagreements, however, enables us to understand that differences in judgments may be due to a difference in access to the situation or object, and not necessarily to a difference in value. The feeling of irresolvable differences that …Read more
  •  19
    Relativism, Disagreement and Predicates of Personal Taste
    In François Recanati, Isidora Stojanovic & Neftali Villanueva (eds.), Context-Dependence, Perspective and Relativity, Mouton De Gruyter. pp. 195--225. 2010.
    Disagreements about what is delicious, what is funny, what is morally acceptable can lead to intractable disputes between parties holding opposing views of a given subject. How should we think of such disputes? Do they always amount to genuine disagreements? The answer will depend on how we understand disagreement and how we should think about the meaning and truth of statements in these areas of discourse. I shall consider cases of dispute and disagreement where relativism about truth appears t…Read more
  •  18
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2005.
    The Oxford Handbooks series is a major new initiative in academic publishing. Each volume offers an authoritative and up-to-date survey of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned essays from leading figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates. Oxford Handbooks provide scholars and graduate students with compelling new perspectives upon a wide range of subjects in the humanities and social sciences. Ernie Lepore a…Read more
  •  18
    Predicates of Taste and Relativism about Truth
    ProtoSociology 31 138-159. 2014.
    Is relativism about truth ever a coherent doctrine? Some people have argued that an answer to this question depends on whether there can be cases of genuine disagreement where those who disagree hold conflicting beliefs towards the same proposition and yet are each entitled to say that what they believe is true. These have been called cases of faultless disagreement and are often explored by considering the case of disagreements about taste. However, this is not the right way to formulate the re…Read more
  •  10
    Knowing Our Own Minds
    Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206): 107-116. 2002.
  •  10
    Questions of Taste: the philosophy of wine (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2007.
    Is the taste of a wine in our minds or in the glass? Can knowledge make a difference to the pleasure a wine gives us? Do the elaborate descriptions of wines in terms of fruits or spices, their "suppleness" or "brawniness," really mean anything? Questions of Taste is the first book to examine the philosophical issues surrounding our experience and enjoyment of wine. Featuring lucid essays from philosophers, a linguist, a biochemist, a wine producer and a wine critic, these leading thinkers use th…Read more
  •  9
    Epistemic constraints on semantic theory
    Dissertation, University of Edinburgh. 1991.
  •  8
    Meaning in Mind: Fodor and his Critics
    Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173): 560-563. 1993.