•  2
    Are human embryos Kantian persons?: Kantian considerations in favor of embryonic stem cell research
    Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1): 4. 2008.
    One argument used by detractors of human embryonic stem cell research invokes Kant's formula of humanity, which proscribes treating persons solely as a means to an end, rather than as ends in themselves. According to Fuat S. Oduncu, for example, adhering to this imperative entails that human embryos should not be disaggregated to obtain pluripotent stem cells for hESCR. Given that human embryos are Kantian persons from the time of their conception, killing them to obtain their cells for research…Read more
  •  89
    In this paper, I appeal to two aspects of Immanuel Kant’s philosophy – his metaphysics and ethics – in defense of abortion rights. Many Kantian pro-life philosophers argue that Kant’s second principle formulation of the categorical imperative, which proscribes treating persons as mere means, applies to human embryos and fetuses. Kant is clear, however, that he means his imperatives to apply to persons, individuals of a rational nature. It is important to determine, therefore, whether there is an…Read more
  •  29
    Yes, the baby should live: a pro-choice response to Giubilini and Minerva
    Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5): 330-335. 2013.
    In their paper 'After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?' Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva argue that because there are no significant differences between a fetus and a neonate, in that neither possess sufficiently robust mental traits to qualify as persons, a neonate may be justifiably killed for any reason that also justifies abortion. To further emphasise their view that a newly born infant is more on a par with a fetus rather than a more developed baby, Giubilini and Minerva el…Read more
  •  24
    Pleading Men and Virtuous Women
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1): 1-24. 2007.
    Far too often in our society, the input of a potential father is not deemed relevant in a woman’s abortion decision. Men, however, can suffer emotional strains due to the abortion of their potential child, and given this harm it seems that morality must make room for a potential father’s voice in the abortion decision. I will argue that a man cannot have the right to veto a woman’s decision to procure an abortion, yet there may be times where a woman may exercise her right to an abortion in a ma…Read more
  •  30
    Defending My “Rethinking” of Roe
    American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12). 2010.
    This Article does not have an abstract
  •  75
    The metaphysical foundations of reproductive ethics
    Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2): 190-204. 2009.
    Many bioethicists working in reproductive ethics tacitly assume some theory of diachronic personal identity. For example, Peter Singer argues that there is no identity relation between a foetus and a future individual because the former shares no robust mental connections with the latter. Consequently, abortion prevents the existence of an individual; it does not destroy an already existing individual. Singer's argument implicitly appeals to the psychological account of personal identity, which,…Read more
  •  28
    A Metaphysical and Ethical Defense of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research
    Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 3 (4): 209-225. 2012.
  •  20
    Revisiting justified nonvoluntary euthanasia
    American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11). 2008.
    No abstract
  •  68
    One argument used by detractors of human embryonic stem cell research (hESCR) invokes Kant's formula of humanity, which proscribes treating persons solely as a means to an end, rather than as ends in themselves. According to Fuat S. Oduncu, for example, adhering to this imperative entails that human embryos should not be disaggregated to obtain pluripotent stem cells for hESCR. Given that human embryos are Kantian persons from the time of their conception, killing them to obtain their cells for …Read more
  •  19
    Revisiting the argument from fetal potential
    Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 7. 2007.
    One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential
  •  8
    Being Ethical: Classic and New Voices on Contemporary Issues (edited book)
    with Shari Collins, Jacqueline M. Gately, and Eric Comerford
    Broadview Press. 2016.
    This anthology takes a broad approach to ethics, incorporating traditional topics and texts while bringing in voices and themes that are too often excluded. A substantial section on ethical theory is provided, as are readings on topics such as oppression, sex, identity, the environment, life and death, war and terror, and caring for others. Accessible introductions and discussion questions are included throughout to contextualize material for the student reader without playing favorites among th…Read more