Unknown
Department Of Philosophy
Alumnus
Athens, Georgia, United States of America
  •  457
    Philosophical sisters, incite!
    Hypatia 19 (4). 2004.
    Editor's note: this is the second essay in Hypatia's series of musings. We welcome reflections on the state of the profession, the life of the independent scholar, political activism, teaching, publishing, or other topics of interest to feminist philosophers. We particularly invite submissions that pick up conversational threads begun by earlier contributions to the column, so that Musings becomes a forum for talking to one another. If you have an idea for the column, please tell us about it
  •  142
    Climate Change, Vulnerability, and Responsibility
    Hypatia 26 (4): 690-714. 2011.
    In this essay I present an overview of the problem of climate change, with attention to issues of interest to feminists, such as the differential responsibilities of nations and the disproportionate “vulnerabilities” of females, people of color, and the economically disadvantaged in relation to climate change. I agree with others that justice requires governments, corporations, and individuals to take full responsibility for histories of pollution, and for present and future greenhouse gas emiss…Read more
  •  115
    Dignity and the right to be lesbian or gay
    Philosophical Studies 132 (1). 2007.
    Richard Mohr emphasizes the importance of dispelling false beliefs about lesbians and gay men, and establishing legislation that protects the rights of sexual minorities. He argues that homophobic policies originate in the belief that gay men and lesbians are categorically less morally valuable than others, rather than deserving of unequal treatment because of their behaviors or actions. In response, I show that homophobic panic over lesbian or gay sex acts is actually quite influential, and arg…Read more
  •  111
    Unravelling the problems in ecofeminism
    Environmental Ethics 14 (4): 351-363. 1992.
    Karen Warren has argued that environmental ethics must be feminist and that feminist ethics must be ecological. Hence, she endorses ecofeminism as an environmental ethic with power and promise. Recent ecofeminist theory, however, is not as powerful as one might hope. In fact, I argue, much of this theory is based on values that are potentially damaging to moral agents, and that are not in accord withfeminist goals. My intent is not to dismantle ecofeminism, but to analyze and clarify some of the…Read more
  •  71
    Women’s work
    The Philosophers' Magazine 39 (39): 56-58. 2007.
  •  64
    On ecofeminist philosophy
    Ethics and the Environment 7 (2): 1-11. 2002.
  •  63
    Although my position is in basic agreement with the notion that war and militarism are feminist issues, I argue that approaches to the ethics of war and peace which do not consider "peacetime" military violence are inadequate for feminist and environmentalist concerns. Because much of the military violence done to women and ecosystems happens outside the boundaries of declared wars, feminist and environmental philosophers ought to emphasize the significance of everyday military violence.
  •  61
    The artist on process and ethics
    with Ada Medina
    Ethics and the Environment 8 (1): 3-21. 2003.
    : Standing before one of Ada Medina's works in a museum recently, I knew myself to be in the company of a distinct presence. The exquisite form was so novel, yet its layers of organicity were deeply familiar. The piece effectively conveyed complex relationality, and pointed toward innovative forms of being, without resorting to didacticism, melodrama, or cliché. I had a strong urge to hug it. I needed to step back and figure it out
  •  34
    Still Fooling with Mother Nature (review)
    Hypatia 16 (3). 2001.
  •  21
    Feminism and Ecological Communities presents a bold and passionate rethinking of teh ecofeminist movement. It is one of the first books to acknowledge the importance of postmodern feminist arguments against ecofeminism whilst persuasively preseenting a strong new case for econolocal feminism. Chris J.Cuomo first traces the emergence of ecofeminism from the ecological and feminist movements before clearly discussing the weaknesses of some ecofeminist positions. Exploring the dualisms of nature/cu…Read more
  •  20
    Tribute for Professor Victoria Davion
    Environmental Ethics 39 (3): 242-242. 2017.
  •  13
    Book Notes (review)
    with Richard Burgh and Lori Watson
    Ethics 118 (2): 378-381. 2008.
  •  13
    Thoughts on Lesbian Differences
    Hypatia 13 (1). 1998.
    Cheshire Calhoun argues that thinking of lesbians as a subcategory of women provides an insufficient basis for considering key differences between lesbians and straight women, and that these politically significant differences are therefore erased by theories and politics that take the subject of feminism to be women. Here I look closely and critically at Calhoun's own account of lesbian differences, and argue that sexual desire, while complicated, ought to remain central in any such account.
  •  11
    Review: Still Fooling with Mother Nature (review)
    Hypatia 16 (3). 2001.
  •  10
    Review of Val Plumwood, Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason (review)
    Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (11). 2002.
  •  8
    Ada Medina: The artist on process and ethics
    Ethics and the Environment 8 (1): 2-21. 2003.
  •  8
    The search for an ethic that is joyful and life-loving, yet politically and scientifically realistic, is at the root of Cuomo's recent philosophy
  •  7
    Women’s work
    The Philosophers' Magazine 39 56-58. 2007.
  •  6
    Flourishing, praxis, and charm
    Ethics and the Environment 4 (1): 101-106. 1999.
  •  6
  •  5
    Onecofeminist philosophy
    Ethics and the Environment 7 (2): 1-11. 2002.
  •  4
    Feminist Ethics and Connection Amidst Evil (review)
    Social Theory and Practice 24 (2): 301-313. 1998.
  •  3
    Unravelling the Problems in Ecofeminism
    Environmental Ethics 14 (4): 351-363. 1992.
    Karen Warren has argued that environmental ethics must be feminist and that feminist ethics must be ecological. Hence, she endorses ecofeminism as an environmental ethic with power and promise. Recent ecofeminist theory, however, is not as powerful as one might hope. In fact, I argue, much of this theory is based on values that are potentially damaging to moral agents, and that are not in accord withfeminist goals. My intent is not to dismantle ecofeminism, but to analyze and clarify some of the…Read more