• A Normative Meaning of Meaningful Work
    Journal of Business Ethics 1-16. forthcoming.
    Research on meaningful work has not embraced a shared definition of what it is, in part because many researchers and laypersons agree that it means different things to different people. However, subjective and social accounts of meaningful work have limited practical value to help people pursue it and to help scholars study it. The account of meaningful work advanced in this paper is inherently normative. It recognizes the relevance of subjective experience and social agreement to appraisals of …Read more
  •  2
    A Normative Meaning of Meaningful Work
    Journal of Business Ethics 1-16. forthcoming.
    Research on meaningful work has not embraced a shared definition of what it is, in part because many researchers and laypersons agree that it means different things to different people. However, subjective and social accounts of meaningful work have limited practical value to help people pursue it and to help scholars study it. The account of meaningful work advanced in this paper is inherently normative. It recognizes the relevance of subjective experience and social agreement to appraisals of …Read more
  •  2
    A Normative Meaning of Meaningful Work
    Journal of Business Ethics 1-16. forthcoming.
    Research on meaningful work has not embraced a shared definition of what it is, in part because many researchers and laypersons agree that it means different things to different people. However, subjective and social accounts of meaningful work have limited practical value to help people pursue it and to help scholars study it. The account of meaningful work advanced in this paper is inherently normative. It recognizes the relevance of subjective experience and social agreement to appraisals of …Read more
  •  12
    Just WorkRussell Muirhead ; ISBN 0-674-01558-4, 207 pages
    Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (1): 110-110. 2006.
  •  6
    Useless and Disinterested: How Literature Makes Us Better
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (2): 95-96. 2016.
  •  6
    This special issue of the Journal of Business Ethics commemorates the 40th Anniversary Conference of the Hoffman Center for Business Ethics at Bentley University. It collects seven of the papers that were presented at the conference in 2016, when scholars, practitioners, and policymakers from across the globe convened to discuss “Global Perspectives on Business Ethics.” From conceptual thinking to theory building and empirical analysis, these articles present several future and mutually supporti…Read more
  • Virtual Special Issue on Humanities and Business Ethics
    Journal of Business Ethics 142 (3): 409-412. 2017.
    This collection of articles on Humanities and Business Ethics is the second virtual special issue of the Journal of Business Ethics. It is a curated selection of previously published papers aimed at inspiring future contributions on Humanities and Business Ethics. This new section of the journal explores artifacts that provide timely and timeless insight into the essential culture and values of business. The ten articles in this VSI draw on seven humanities disciplines: anthropology, architectur…Read more
  •  4
    Is business ethics philosophy or sophism?
    Business Ethics 10 (4): 331-339. 2001.
    The contrast between the philosopher and the sophist is subtle and significant. The significant difference is identified by Socrates when he claims, in the Apology 21d, to be the wisest man in Athens: “Neither of us has any knowledge to boast of, but he thinks that he knows something which he does not know, whereas I am quite conscious of my ignorance.” Nearly two and one half millennia later, business ethics has transported street corner conversation into the meeting room and board room, where …Read more
  •  55
    The ethical tension over whether countries have differentiated responsibilities for climate change mitigation evokes the tale of a master and a man. The one who thinks she is the master is analogous to the wealthier, industrialized nations and their market actors, and the human is the rest of humanity, particularly those citizens of less developed countries. Since 1992, there has been formal, stated agreement that there should be differentiated responsibilities for climate change mitigation betw…Read more
  •  5
    This article is the guest editors’ introduction to the Special Topic Forum on Extreme Operating Environments appearing in Business & Society. The forum includes two articles accepted after review and revision. The two articles address the macro-level aspects of business’s role in society in terms of accessing resources and markets and in terms of being a change agent or enabler to promote a better or more stable local economy. The articles also provide case studies of businesses developing, gett…Read more
  •  10
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Moral Hazard in Pediatrics”
    with Donald Brunnquell
    American Journal of Bioethics 16 (8): 3-4. 2016.
  •  18
    Moral Hazard in Pediatrics
    with Donald Brunnquell
    American Journal of Bioethics 16 (7): 29-38. 2016.
    “Moral hazard” is a term familiar in economics and business ethics that illuminates why rational parties sometimes choose decisions with bad moral outcomes without necessarily intending to behave selfishly or immorally. The term is not generally used in medical ethics. Decision makers such as parents and physicians generally do not use the concept or the word in evaluating ethical dilemmas. They may not even be aware of the precise nature of the moral hazard problem they are experiencing, beyond…Read more
  •  37
    Teaching Meaningful Work
    Journal of Business Ethics Education 6 43-67. 2009.
    Meaningful work is an important but under-represented topic in the business ethics and management curriculum. One definition of meaningful work is that it enables self-realization and service to others while fitting what the market demands. This paper provides an outline for thinking about meaningful work by exploring the evolution of and conclusions from a teaching exercise on meaningful work
  • Cantor Fitzgerald and September 11
    Journal of Business Ethics Education 9 411-419. 2012.
  •  21
    What is a Good Answer to an Ethical Question?
    with Katherina Glac
    Journal of Business Ethics Education 9 233-258. 2012.
    Instructors of business ethics now have a wealth of cases and other pedagogical material to draw on to contribute to achieving ethics learning goals now required at most business schools. However, standard ethics case pedagogy seems to provide more guidance regarding the form and process for getting to a good answer than on the ethical content of the answer itself. Indeed, instructors often withhold their own judgments on what is a good answer so as not to indoctrinate students with the instruct…Read more
  •  29
    Reading leaders' minds: in search of the canon of 21st century global capitalism (review)
    Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1): 47-61. 2012.
    This paper explores the values and practices of capitalism and speculates about how they might evolve as twenty-first century global capitalism comes into being. The values embodied by the Westernized canon we have inherited might account for certain shortcomings of capitalism. As economic power shifts away from dominant markets of the recent past, our search for the canon of twenty-first century global capitalism can help shape the values we aspire for our capitalism of the future to embody and…Read more
  •  9
    How to Live Without Certainty, Without Being Paralyzed by Hesitation
    with Virginia Gerde
    Business and Professional Ethics Journal 33 (2-3): 205-209. 2014.
    According to Bertrand Russell, philosophy should “teach how to live without certainty, and yet without being paralyzed by hesitation.” Recent natural and human-made disasters have confronted business leaders to act decisively without certainty in circumstances with profound implications for ethical well-being. This article introduces a Special Topic Forum on Extreme Operating Environments, defined as times of great uncertainty and/or crisis which challenge human capabilities, organizational oper…Read more
  •  1
    Business and/as/of the Humanities
    Journal of Business Ethics Education 7 201-212. 2010.
    In their prevailing conceptions, business is interested, whereas the humanities provoke disinterested attention in value for its own sake. Applying Danto’s and/as/of structure to Freeman’s documentary film, Leadership and Theater, this paper outlines the business of the humanities, depicts the value of the humanities to business ethics education, and asks how cultivating an attitude of business as a humanity might influence our students’ views of business and business ethics. Regarding business …Read more
  •  97
    Moral Luck and Business Ethics
    Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4): 773-787. 2008.
    Moral luck – which seems to appear when circumstances beyond a person’s control influence our moral attributions of praise and blame – is troubling in that modern moral theory has supposed morality to be immune to luck. In business, moral luck commonly influences our moral judgments, many of which have economic consequences that cannot be reversed. The possibility that the chance intervention of luck could influence the way in which we assign moral accountability in business ethics is unsettling…Read more
  •  48
    Dealing with Swindlers and Devils: Literature and Business Ethics
    Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4): 359-373. 2005.
    Part of the value of stories is moral, in that understanding them, and the characters within them, is one way in which we seek to make moral sense of life. Arguably, it has become quite common to use stories in order to make moral sense of business life. Case method is the standard teaching method in top business schools, and so-called “war stories” are customary for on-the-job training. Shakespeare is a trendy purveyor of leadership education. Several books and articles have been written on the…Read more
  •  1
    What is a Good Answer to an Ethical Question?
    with Katherina Glac
    Journal of Business Ethics Education 9 233-258. 2012.
    Instructors of business ethics now have a wealth of cases and other pedagogical material to draw on to contribute to achieving ethics learning goals now required at most business schools. However, standard ethics case pedagogy seems to provide more guidance regarding the form and process for getting to a good answer than on the ethical content of the answer itself. Indeed, instructors often withhold their own judgments on what is a good answer so as not to indoctrinate students with the instruct…Read more
  •  68
    Revisiting the Global Business Ethics Question
    Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2): 237-251. 2010.
    A fundamental question of global business ethics is, “When moral business conduct standards conflict across borders, whose standards should prevail?” Western scholarship and practice tends to depict home country standards as “higher” or more “restrictive”or “well-ordered” than the “lower” standards of emerging market actors. As much as the question appears culturally neutral, many who ask it do so with a culturally-specific lens shaped by prevailing conditions of Western economic strength. Howev…Read more
  •  14
    Is business ethics philosophy or sophism?
    Business Ethics 10 (4). 2001.
    The contrast between the philosopher and the sophist is subtle and significant. The significant difference is identified by Socrates when he claims, in the Apology 21d, to be the wisest man in Athens: “Neither of us has any knowledge to boast of, but he thinks that he knows something which he does not know, whereas I am quite conscious of my ignorance.” Nearly two and one half millennia later, business ethics has transported street corner conversation into the meeting room and board room, where …Read more
  •  30
    Compliance and the Illusion of Ethical Progress
    Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3): 241-251. 2006.
    It has become common for business practitioners and management scholars to distinguish between compliance and ethics. According to the conventional distinction as expressed in Paine’s formulation of Integrity Strategy, compliance is ordinarily a necessary but insufficient condition for ethics. Now that this distinction has been institutionalized in the most significant judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in American business conduct management since the Enron failure, it is worth …Read more
  •  55
    Meaningful Work and Moral Worth
    Business and Professional Ethics Journal 28 (1-4): 27-48. 2009.
    In general, meaningful work has been conceived to be a matter of institutional obligation and individual choice. In other words, solong as the institution has fulfilled its objective moral obligation to make meaningful work possible, it is up to the subjective volition of the individual to choose or not to choose work that is perceived to be meaningful. However, this conception is incomplete in at least two ways. First, it neglects the role of institutional volition; that is, it does not emphasi…Read more
  •  20
    Executive Compensation and Moral Luck
    Business and Professional Ethics Journal 34 (2): 237-258. 2015.
  •  30
    Business and Ethics After September 11
    Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (1): 259-300. 2004.
  •  8
    Teaching Meaningful Work: Philosophical Discussions on the Ethics of Career Choice
    Journal of Business Ethics Education 6 43-67. 2009.
    Meaningful work is an important but under-represented topic in the business ethics and management curriculum. One definition of meaningful work is that it enables self-realization and service to others while fitting what the market demands. This paper provides an outline for thinking about meaningful work by exploring the evolution of and conclusions from a teaching exercise on meaningful work.
  •  29
  •  11
    Cantor Fitzgerald and September 11
    Journal of Business Ethics Education 9 411-419. 2012.