College Station, Texas, United States of America
Areas of Specialization
Applied Ethics
Areas of Interest
Applied Ethics
Normative Ethics
  •  17
    CLARE PALMER | : This paper argues that there is no simple rift between animal liberation and environmental ethics in terms of strategies for environmental conservation. The situation is much more complicated, with multiple fault lines that can divide both environmental ethicists from one another and animal ethicists from one another—but that can also create unexpected convergences between these two groups. First, the paper gives an account of the alleged rift between animal liberation and envir…Read more
  •  28
    Should we help wild animals suffering negative impacts from climate change?
    In Svenja Springer & Herwig Grimm (eds.), Professionals in food chains, Wageningen Academic Publishers. pp. 35-40. 2018.
    Should we help wild animals suffering negative impacts from anthropogenic climate change? It follows from diverse ethical positions that we should, although this idea troubles defenders of wildness value. One already existing climate threat to wild animals, especially in the Arctic, is the disruption of food chains. I take polar bears as my example here: Should we help starving polar bears? If so, how? A recent scientific paper suggests that as bears’ food access worsens due to a changing climat…Read more
  •  59
    Should We Offer Assistance to Both Wild and Domesticated Animals?
    The Harvard Review of Philosophy 25 7-19. 2018.
    In this paper, I consider whether we should offer assistance to both wild and domesticated animals when they are suffering. I argue that we may have different obligations to assist wild and domesticated animals because they have different morally-relevant relationships with us. I explain how different approaches to animal ethics, which, for simplicity, I call capacity-oriented and context-oriented, address questions about animal assistance differently. I then defend a broadly context-oriented ap…Read more
  •  53
    Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy
    with Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, and Lori Gruen
    Ethics and the Environment 12 (2): 117-150. 2007.
  •  185
    Some Problems With Sustainability
    Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (1): 52-62. 1994.
  •  24
    Animals, colonisation and urbanisation
    Philosophy and Geography 6 (1): 47-58. 2003.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argue…Read more
  •  590
    A Bibliographical Essay On Environmental Ethics'
    Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (1): 68-97. 1994.
  • Killing Animals, edited by The Animal Studies Group
    Illinois University Press. 2006.
  •  53
    Three Questions on Climate Change
    Ethics and International Affairs 28 (3): 343-350. 2014.
    Climate change will have highly significant and largely negative effects on human societies into the foreseeable future, effects that are already generating ethical and policy dilemmas of unprecedented scope, scale, and complexity. One important group of ethical and policy issues raised here concerns what I call environmental values. By this I do not mean the impact that climate change will have on the environment as a valuable human resource, nor am I referring to the changing climate as a thre…Read more
  •  32
  •  4
    Introduction to the Special Edition on Engineering and Animal Ethics
    with Gary Varner
    Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2): 137-142. 2018.
  •  23
    Beyond Castration and Culling: Should We Use Non-surgical, Pharmacological Methods to Control the Sexual Behavior and Reproduction of Animals?
    with Hanne Gervi Pedersen and Peter Sandøe
    Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2): 197-218. 2018.
    This paper explores ethical issues raised by the application of non-surgical, pharmaceutical fertility control to manage reproductive behaviors in domesticated and wild animal species. We focus on methods that interfere with the effects of GnRH, making animals infertile and significantly suppressing sexual behavior in both sexes. The paper is anchored by considering ethical issues raised by four diverse cases: the use of pharmaceutical fertility control in male slaughter pigs, domesticated stall…Read more
  •  19
    Encouraging Self-Reflection by Veterinary Clinicians: Ethics on the Clinic Floor
    with Sandra A. Corr and Peter Sandøe
    American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2): 55-57. 2018.
  •  12
    Can - and should - we make reparation to Nature?
    In William P. Kabasenche, Michael O'Rourke & Matther Slater (eds.), The Environment: Philosophy, Science, Ethics, Mit Press. pp. 201-222. 2012.
  •  33
    In this study, Clare Palmer challenges the belief that the process thinking of writers like A.N. Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne has offered an unambiguously positive contribution to environmental ethics. She compares process ethics to a variety of other forms of environmental ethics, as well as deep ecology, and reveals a number of difficulties associated with process thinking about the environment.
  •  54
    Ethics of WIldife Management and Conservation: What Should we Try To Protect?
    with Christian Gambourg and Peter Sandoe
    Nature Education Knowledge 3 (7): 8. 2012.
  • Animal Liberation, Environmental Ethics and Domestication
    with Bhaskar Vira, Neville Brown, and Michael Freeden
    Environmental Values 5 (2): 187-188. 1996.
  •  2
    Fat Companions: understanding canine and feline obesity and its effects on welfare
    with Peter Sandoe and Sandra Cprr
    In Michael Appleby, Dan Weary & Peter Sandoe (eds.), Dilemmas in Animal Welfare, Cabi International. pp. 28-45. 2014.
  •  43
    The Idea of the Domesticated Animal Contract
    Environmental Values 6 (4). 1997.
    Some recent works have suggested that the relationship between human beings and domesticated animals might be described as contractual. This paper explores how the idea of such an animal contract might relate to key characteristics of social contract theory, in particular to issues of the change in state from 'nature' to 'culture'; to free consent and irrevocability; and to the benefits and losses to animals which might follow from such a contract. The paper concludes that there are important di…Read more
  • Le contrat domestique
    In Hicham-Stéphane Afeissa & Jean-Baptsite Jeangène Vilmer (eds.), Philosophie animale. Différence, éthique et communauté, Vrin. pp. 333-373. 2010.
  •  47
    Environmental Ethics
    with Katie McShane and Ron Sandler
    Annual Review of Environment and Resources 39 419-442. 2014.
    Environmental ethics—the study of ethical questions raised by human relations with the nonhuman environment—emerged as an important subfield of philosophy during the 1970s. It is now a flourishing area of research. This article provides a review of the secular, Western traditions in the field. It examines both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric claims about what has value, as well as divergent views about whether environmental ethics should be concerned with bringing about best consequences,…Read more
  •  43
    An Overview of Environmental Ethics
    In Holmes Rolston & Andrew Light (eds.), Environmental Ethics, Blackwell. pp. 15-37. 2002.
  •  37
    Colonization, urbanization, and animals
    Philosophy and Geography 6 (1). 2003.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argue…Read more
  •  68
    In his paper The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem (Nanoethics 2:305–316, 2008) Paul Thompson argues that the possibility of disenhancing animals in order to improve animal welfare poses a philosophical conundrum. Although many people intuitively think such disenhancement would be morally impermissible, it’s difficult to find good arguments to support such intuitions. In this brief response to Thompson, I accept that there’s a conundrum here. But I argue…Read more
  •  63
    What (If Anything) Do We Owe Wild Animals?
    Between the Species 16 (1): 4. 2013.
    It’s widely agreed that animal pain matters morally – that we shouldn’t, for instance, starve our animal companions, and that we should provide medical care to sick or injured agricultural animals, and not only because it benefits us to do so. But do we have the same moral responsibilities towards wild animals? Should we feed them if they are starving, and intervene to prevent them from undergoing other forms of suffering, for instance from predation? Using an example that includes both wild and…Read more