•  66
    Clinical ethics committees aim to resolve conflict, facilitate communication and ease moral distress in health care. Dialogue in committee discussions is complex and involves a balance between implicitly and explicitly expressed values of patients, families and professionals. Evaluating effectiveness and concrete outcomes is challenging and most studies focus on broad benefits such as quality of care and reduction of unnecessary or unwanted treatments. In this paper we propose ‘physician satisfa…Read more
  •  37
    The Unique Nature of Clinical Ethics in Allied Health Pediatrics: Implications for Ethics Education
    with Merle Spriggs, Craig L. Fry, and Lynn Gillam
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (4): 471-480. 2010.
    Ethics education is recognized as an integral component of health professionals’ education and has been occurring in various guises in the curricula of health professional training in many countries since at least the 1970s. However, there are a number of different aims and approaches adopted by individual educators, programs, and, importantly, different health professions that may be characterized according to strands or trends in ethics education
  •  22
    Background: Obtaining patients’ informed consent is an ethical and legal obligation in healthcare practice. Whilst the law provides prescriptive rules and guidelines, ethical theories of autonomy provide moral foundations. Models of practice of consent, have been developed in the bioethical literature to assist in understanding and integrating the ethical theory of autonomy and legal obligations into the clinical process of obtaining a patient’s informed consent to treatment.Aims: To review four…Read more
  •  15
    The role of emotions in health professional ethics teaching
    with Lynn Gillam, Marilys Guillemin, and Sally Warmington
    Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5): 331-335. 2014.
    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there is a need for a pedagogical f…Read more
  •  15
    The zone of parental discretion and the complexity of paediatrics: A response to Alderson
    with Rosalind McDougall, Lynn Gillam, and Merle Spriggs
    Clinical Ethics 13 (4): 172-174. 2018.
    Alderson critiques our recent book on the basis that it overlooks children’s own views about their medical treatment. In this response, we discuss the complexity of the paediatric clinical context and the value of diverse approaches to investigating paediatric ethics. Our book focuses on a specific problem: entrenched disagreements between doctors and parents about a child’s medical treatment in the context of a paediatric hospital. As clinical ethicists, our research question arose from clinici…Read more
  •  10
    Making Meaning From Experience: A Working Typology for Pediatrics Ethics Consultations
    with Lynn Gillam and Rosalind McDougall
    American Journal of Bioethics 15 (5): 24-26. 2015.
  •  9
    Ethics of fertility preservation for prepubertal children: should clinicians offer procedures where efficacy is largely unproven?
    with R. J. McDougall, L. Gillam, and Y. Jayasinghe
    Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (1): 27-31. 2017.
    Young children with cancer are treated with interventions that can have a high risk of compromising their reproductive potential. ‘Fertility preservation’ for children who have not yet reached puberty involves surgically removing and cryopreserving reproductive tissue prior to treatment in the expectation that strategies for the use of this tissue will be developed in the future. Fertility preservation for prepubertal children is ethically complex because the techniques largely lack proven effic…Read more
  •  7
    Collaboration in Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Method for Achieving “Balanced Accountability”
    with Rosalind McDougall, Merle Spriggs, and Lynn Gillam
    American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6): 47-48. 2014.
    No abstract
  •  6
    Ethics of fertility preservation for prepubertal children: should clinicians offer procedures where efficacy is largely unproven?
    with Rosalind J. McDougall, Lynn Gillam, and Yasmin Jayasinghe
    Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1): 27-31. 2018.
    Young children with cancer are treated with interventions that can have a high risk of compromising their reproductive potential. ‘Fertility preservation’ for children who have not yet reached puberty involves surgically removing and cryopreserving reproductive tissue prior to treatment in the expectation that strategies for the use of this tissue will be developed in the future. Fertility preservation for prepubertal children is ethically complex because the techniques largely lack proven effic…Read more
  •  5
    Ethically Important Moments
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4): 477-480. 2014.
  •  5
    “I Left the Museum Somewhat Changed”: Visual Arts and Health Ethics Education
    with Heather Gaunt
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (3): 511-524. 2018.
  •  3
    The Value of Open Deliberation in Clinical Ethics, and the Role of Parents’ Reasons in the Zone of Parental Discretion
    with Rosalind McDougall and Lynn Gillam
    American Journal of Bioethics 18 (8): 47-49. 2018.