•  33
    Wittgenstein and the 'Philosophical Investigations'
    Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 63 (1): 205-205. 2001.
  •  14
    Wittgenstein and the Philosophical Investigations
    Mind 111 (441): 147-149. 2002.
  •  7
    Wittgenstein in the 1930s: Between the Tractatus and the Investigations (edited book)
    Cambridge University Press. 2018.
    Wittgenstein's 'middle period' is often seen as a transitional phase connecting his better-known early and later philosophies. The fifteen essays in this volume focus both on the distinctive character of his teaching and writing in the 1930s, and on its pivotal importance for an understanding of his philosophy as a whole. They offer wide-ranging perspectives on the central issue of how best to identify changes and continuities in his philosophy during those years, as well as on particular topics…Read more
  •  40
    In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, David Stern examines Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. He gives particular attention to both the arguments of the Investigations and the way in which the work is written, and especially to the role of dialogue in the book. While he concentrates on helping the reader to arrive at his or her own interpretation of the primary text, he also provides guidance to the unusually wide range of existing interpretations, and to the reason…Read more
  •  14
    Wittgenstein Reads Weininger (edited book)
    Cambridge University Press. 2004.
    Otto Weininger was one of the most controversial and widely read authors of fin-de-siècle Vienna. He was both condemned for his misogyny, self-hatred, anti-semitism and homophobia, as well as praised for his uncompromising and outspoken approach to gender and morality. For Wittgenstein Weininger was a 'remarkable genius'. He repeatedly recommended Weininger's Sex and Character to friends and students and included the author on a short list of figures who had influenced him. The purpose of this n…Read more
  • This edition of G. E. Moore's notes taken at Wittgenstein's seminal Cambridge lectures in the early 1930s provides, for the first time, an almost verbatim record of those classes. The presentation of the notes is both accessible and faithful to their original manuscripts, and a comprehensive introduction and synoptic table of contents provide the reader with essential contextual information and summaries of the topics in each lecture. The lectures form an excellent introduction to Wittgenstein's…Read more
  • Wittgenstein and the Philosophical Investigations (review)
    Mind 111 (441): 147-149. 2002.
  •  6
    Sociology of Science, Rule Following and Forms of Life
    Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 9 347-367. 2002.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein was trained as a scientist and an engineer. He received a diploma in mechanical engineering from the Technische Hochschule in Charlottenburg, Berlin, in 1906, after which he did several years of research on aeronautics before turning to the full-time study of logic and philosophy. Hertz, Boltzmann, Mach, Weininger, and William James, all important influences on Wittgenstein, are authors whose work was both philosophical and scientific. The relationship between everyday life, …Read more
  •  232
    Wittgenstein’s writings and lectures during the first half of the 1930s play a crucial role in any interpretation of the relationship between the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations . G. E. Moore’s notes of Wittgenstein’s Cambridge lectures, 1930-1933, offer us a remarkably careful and conscientious record of what Wittgenstein said at the time, and are much more detailed and reliable than previously published notes from those lectures. The co-authors are currently editing these notes …Read more
  •  14
    Leading a Human Life: Wittgenstein, Intentionality and Romanticism (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 52 (3): 676-677. 1999.
    This is an original, ambitious, and provocative book. It argues that Wittgenstein’s later philosophy can best be understood as a response to two problems that animate post-Kantian idealism and romanticism, drawing primarily on the work of Fichte, Schiller, Schlegel, Hegel, Wordsworth, and Goethe. The first is the metaphilosophical problem of the “critique of critique,” the question of what basis can there possibly be for critical philosophy if Kant’s own appeal to the categories proves unaccepta…Read more
  • Book Reviews (review)
    Mind 99 (395): 479-482. 1990.
  • Was Wittgenstein a Jew?
    In James Klagge (ed.), Wittgenstein: Biography and Philosoph, Cambridge University Press. 2001.
  •  14
    The Later Wittgenstein: The Emergence of a New Philosophical Method
    with S. Stephen Hilmy
    Philosophical Review 99 (4): 639. 1990.
  •  3
    Russell Nieli, Wittgenstein: From Mysticism to Ordinary Language (review)
    Philosophy in Review 7 (12): 517-519. 1987.
  •  11
    Sociology of science, rule following and forms of life
    In Michael Heidelberger & Friedrich Stadler (eds.), History of Philosophy of Science: New Trends and Perspectives. Vienna Circle Institute yearbook (9), Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 347-367. 2002.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein was trained as a scientist and an engineer. He received a diploma in mechanical engineering from the Technische Hochschule in Charlottenburg, Berlin, in 1906, after which he did several years of research on aeronautics before turning to the full-time study of logic and philosophy. Hertz, Boltzmann, Mach, Weininger, and William James, all important influences on Wittgenstein, are authors whose work was both philosophical and scientific. The relationship between everyday life, …Read more
  •  13
    Reading Wittgenstein (on) Reading An Introduction
    In David G. Stern & Béla Szabados (eds.), Wittgenstein Reads Weininger, Cambridge University Press. pp. 1. 2004.
  •  3
    Private Language
    In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein, Oxford University Press. 2011.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein's treatment of private language has received more attention than any other aspect of his philosophy. Yet, for more than fifty years, a remarkably self-contained exegetical tradition has defined the terms of debate and the principal positions that are discussed. Orthodox interpreters hold that the proof that a private language is impossible turns on showing it is ruled out by some set of systematic philosophical commitments about logic, meaning, and knowledge. Leading candidat…Read more
  •  12
    Comment lire les recherches philosophiques?
    with Élisabeth Rigal
    Philosophie 86 (3): 40. 2005.