•  232
    Wittgenstein’s writings and lectures during the first half of the 1930s play a crucial role in any interpretation of the relationship between the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations . G. E. Moore’s notes of Wittgenstein’s Cambridge lectures, 1930-1933, offer us a remarkably careful and conscientious record of what Wittgenstein said at the time, and are much more detailed and reliable than previously published notes from those lectures. The co-authors are currently editing these notes …Read more
  •  117
    Recent work on Wittgenstein, 1980–1990 (review)
    Synthese 98 (3): 415-458. 1994.
    While Wittgenstein wrote unconventionally and denied that he was advancing philosophical theses, most of his interpreters have attributed conventional philosophical theses to him. But the best recent interpretations have taken the form of his writing and his distinctive way of doing philosophy seriously. The 1980s have also seen the emergence of a body of work on Wittgenstein that makes extensive use of the unpublished Wittgenstein papers. This work on Wittgenstein's method and his way of writin…Read more
  •  91
    Wittgenstein on Mind and Language
    Oxford University Press. 1995.
    Drawing on ten years of research on the unpublished Wittgenstein papers, Stern investigates what motivated Wittgenstein's philosophical writing and casts new light on the Tractatus and Philosophical Investigations. The book is an exposition of Wittgenstein's early conception of the nature of representation and how his later revision and criticism of that work led to a radically different way of looking at mind and language. It also explains how the unpublished manuscripts and typescripts were pu…Read more
  •  78
    Wittgenstein, the Vienna Circle, and physicalism: A reassessment
    In Alan Richardson & Thomas Uebel (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Logical Empiricism, Cambridge University Press. pp. 305--31. 2007.
    The "standard account" of Wittgenstein’s relations with the Vienna Circle is that the early Wittgenstein was a principal source and inspiration for the Circle’s positivistic and scientific philosophy, while the later Wittgenstein was deeply opposed to the logical empiricist project of articulating a "scientific conception of the world." However, this telegraphic summary is at best only half-true and at worst deeply misleading. For it prevents us appreciating the fluidity and protean character of…Read more
  •  68
    This paper examines a number of river images which have been attributed to Heraclitus, the ways they are used by Plato and Wittgenstein, and the connection between these uses of imagery and the metaphilosophical issues about the nature and limits of philosophy which they lead to. After indicating some of the connections between Heraclitus’, Plato’s and Wittgenstein’s use of river images, I give a preliminary reading of three crucial fragments from the Heraclitean corpus, associating each with a …Read more
  •  64
  •  40
    In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, David Stern examines Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. He gives particular attention to both the arguments of the Investigations and the way in which the work is written, and especially to the role of dialogue in the book. While he concentrates on helping the reader to arrive at his or her own interpretation of the primary text, he also provides guidance to the unusually wide range of existing interpretations, and to the reason…Read more
  •  37
    Review of Taking Wittgenstein at his Word by Robert Fogelin (review)
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1): 147-148. 2012.
  •  34
    The Cambridge Companion to Wittgenstein (edited book)
    with Hans Sluga
    Cambridge University Press. 1996.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein is one of the most important, influential, and often-cited philosophers of the twentieth century, yet he remains one of its most elusive and least accessible. The essays in this volume address central themes in Wittgenstein's writings on the philosophy of mind, language, logic, and mathematics. They chart the development of his work and clarify the connections between its different stages. The contributors illuminate the character of the whole body of work by keeping a tight …Read more
  •  33
    Wittgenstein and the 'Philosophical Investigations'
    Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 63 (1): 205-205. 2001.
  •  33
    The "standard account" of Wittgenstein’s relations with the Vienna Circle is that the early Wittgenstein was a principal source and inspiration for the Circle’s positivistic and scientific philosophy, while the later Wittgenstein was deeply opposed to the logical empiricist project of articulating a "scientific conception of the world." However, this telegraphic summary is at best only half-true and at worst deeply misleading. For it prevents us appreciating the fluidity and protean character of…Read more
  •  29
    The significance of jewishness for Wittgenstein's philosophy
    Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 43 (4). 2000.
    Did Wittgenstein consider himself a Jew? Should we? Wittgenstein repeatedly wrote about Jews and Judaism in the 1930s, and biographical studies make it clear that this writing about Jewishness was a way in which he thought about the kind of person he was and the nature of his philosophical work. Those who have written about Wittgenstein on the Jews have drawn very different conclusions. But much of this debate is confused, because the notion of being a Jew, of Jewishness, is itself ambiguous and…Read more
  •  26
    The University of Iowa Tractatus Map
    Nordic Wittgenstein Review 5 (2): 203-220. 2016.
    Drawing on recent work on the nature of the numbering system of the _Tractatus_ and Wittgenstein’s use of that system in his composition of the _Prototractatus_, the paper sets out the rationale for the online tool called__ __ The University of Iowa Tractatus Map. The map consists of a website with a front page that links to two separate subway-style maps of the hypertextual numbering system Wittgenstein used in his _Tractatus_. One map displays the structure of the published _Tractatus_; the ot…Read more
  •  23
    Des Remarques philosophiques aux Recherches philosophiques
    Philosophiques 39 (1): 9-34. 2012.
    La discussion sur le langage privé que l’on trouve dans les Recherchesphilosophiques a été écrite entre 1937 et 1945, après que les 190 premières remarques de la partie I du livre eurent presque atteint leur forme finale. Les textes post-1936 sur le langage privé constituent un nouveau départ, dans sa lettre et son esprit, par rapport au matériau d’avant 1936.Néanmoins, entre 1929 et 1936, Wittgenstein s’est penché à plusieurs reprises sur l’idée d’un langage « que moi seul peux comprendre ». Un…Read more
  •  22
    The “Middle Wittgenstein” Revisited
    In Annalisa Coliva, Volker Munz & Danièle Moyal-Sharrock (eds.), Mind, Language and Action: Proceedings of the 36th International Wittgenstein Symposium, De Gruyter. pp. 181-204. 2015.
  •  17
    Review of Sensations: A Defence of Type Materialism (review)
    Philosophical Books 34 (1): 32-33. 1993.
  •  14
    Leading a Human Life: Wittgenstein, Intentionality and Romanticism (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 52 (3): 676-677. 1999.
    This is an original, ambitious, and provocative book. It argues that Wittgenstein’s later philosophy can best be understood as a response to two problems that animate post-Kantian idealism and romanticism, drawing primarily on the work of Fichte, Schiller, Schlegel, Hegel, Wordsworth, and Goethe. The first is the metaphilosophical problem of the “critique of critique,” the question of what basis can there possibly be for critical philosophy if Kant’s own appeal to the categories proves unaccepta…Read more
  •  14
    The Later Wittgenstein: The Emergence of a New Philosophical Method
    with S. Stephen Hilmy
    Philosophical Review 99 (4): 639. 1990.
  •  14
    Wittgenstein and the Philosophical Investigations
    Mind 111 (441): 147-149. 2002.
  •  14
    Wittgenstein Reads Weininger (edited book)
    Cambridge University Press. 2004.
    Otto Weininger was one of the most controversial and widely read authors of fin-de-siècle Vienna. He was both condemned for his misogyny, self-hatred, anti-semitism and homophobia, as well as praised for his uncompromising and outspoken approach to gender and morality. For Wittgenstein Weininger was a 'remarkable genius'. He repeatedly recommended Weininger's Sex and Character to friends and students and included the author on a short list of figures who had influenced him. The purpose of this n…Read more