• Binary Bullets (edited book)
    with Bradley J. Strawser and Adam Henschke
  • Professions in Ethical Focus – Second Edition (edited book)
    Broadview Press. 2021.
    This second edition of _Professions in Ethical Focus_ comprises over seventy-five readings complemented by twenty case studies with corresponding discussion questions. These resources are organized into several thematic units, including “conflicts of interest,” “honesty, deception, and trust,” “privacy and confidentiality,” and “professionalism, diversity, and pluralism.” An alternative table of contents is also provided, identifying readings that bear on particular professions such as engineeri…Read more
  • Ethics and Error in Medicine (edited book)
    with Fritz Allhoff, J. D., PhD., and Sandra L. Borden
    Routledge. 2020.
  •  8
    Medical Error and Moral Luck
    Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (3): 187-203. 2019.
    This special issue on ethics and error in medicine reinvigorates a conversation that has been substantially dormant for twenty years. The papers in this issue elaborate and update that conversation in significant ways, particularly with regard to vulnerable populations and the epistemology of medical error. But this first paper is largely conceptual, laying out the motivation for caring about medical error in the first place, exploring what medical error is, and proposing a moral framework to he…Read more
  •  15
    Rural Bioethics: The Alaska Context
    HEC Forum 32 (4): 313-331. 2020.
    With by far the lowest population density in the United States, myriad challenges attach to healthcare delivery in Alaska. In the “Size, Population, and Accessibility” section, we characterize this geographic context, including how it is exacerbated by lack of infrastructure. In the “Distributing Healthcare” section, we turn to healthcare economics and staffing, showing how these bear on delivery—and are exacerbated by geography. In the “Health Care in Rural Alaska” section, we turn to rural car…Read more
  •  2
    Ethics and Error in Medicine (edited book)
    with Sandra Borden
  •  9
    Ancient Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary (edited book)
    with Nick Smith and Anand Jayprakash Vaidya
    Wiley-Blackwell. 2008.
    Part of The Blackwell Readings in Philosophy Series, this survey of ancient philosophy explores the scope of ancient philosophy, focusing on the key philosophers and their texts, examining how the foundations of philosophy as we know it were laid.
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    Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary (edited book)
    with Elizabeth S. Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, and Anand Jayprakash Vaidya
    Wiley-Blackwell. 2007.
    Part of the Blackwell Readings in the History of Philosophy series, this survey of late modern philosophy focuses on the key texts and philosophers of the period whose beliefs changed the course of western thought.
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    Untangling the debate: The ethics of human enhancement (review)
    NanoEthics 2 (3): 251-264. 2008.
    Human enhancement, in which nanotechnology is expected to play a major role, continues to be a highly contentious ethical debate, with experts on both sides calling it the single most important issue facing science and society in this brave, new century. This paper is a broad introduction to the symposium herein that explores a range of perspectives related to that debate. We will discuss what human enhancement is and its apparent contrast to therapy; and we will begin to tease apart the myriad …Read more
  •  70
    Against Unrestricted Human Enhancement
    Journal of Evolution and Technology 18 (1): 35-41. 2008.
    The defining debate in this new century will be about technology and human enhancement, according to many across the political spectrum.[1] Our ability to use science to enhance our bodies and minds – as opposed to its application for therapeutic purposes – is one of the most personal and therefore passionate issues in an era where emerging technologies seduce us with new and fantastic possibilities for our future. But in the process, we are forced to rethink what it means to be human or, essent…Read more
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    This introduction provides background information on the emerging field of nanotechnology and its ethical dimensions. After defining nanotechnology and briefly discussing its status as a discipline, about which there exists a meta-controversy, this introduction turns to a discussion of the status of nanoethics and lays out particular issues of concern in the field, both current and emerging.
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    Human enhancement – our ability to use technology to enhance our bodies and minds, as opposed to its application for therapeutic purposes – is a critical issue facing nanotechnology. It will be involved in some of the near-term applications of nanotechnology, with such research labs as MIT’s Institute for Soldier Technologies working on exoskeletons and other innovations that increase human strength and capabilities. It is also a core issue related to far-term predictions in nanotechnology, such…Read more
  •  36
    Nanoscience and nanoethics: Defining the disciplines
    Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. forthcoming.
    This introduction provides background information on the emerging field of nanotechnology and its ethical dimensions. After defining nanotechnology and briefly discussing its status as a discipline, about which there exists a meta-controversy, this introduction turns to a discussion of the status of nanoethics and lays out particular issues of concern in the field, both current and emerging.
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    Ongoing research in nanotechnology promises both innovations and risks, potentially and profoundly changing the world. This book helps to promote a balanced understanding of this important emerging technology, offering an informed and impartial look at the technology, its science, and its social impact and ethics. Nanotechnology is crucial for the next generation of industries, financial markets, research labs, and our everyday lives; this book provides an informed and balanced look at nanotechn…Read more
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    What’s So Special about Nanotechnology and Nanoethics?
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2): 179-190. 2006.
    Nanoethics is a contentious field for several reasons. Some believe it should not be recognized as a proper area of study, because they believe that nanotechnology itself is not a true category but rather an amalgamation of other sciences, such as chemistry, physics, and engineering. Critics also allege that nanoethics does not raise any new issues but rather revisits familiar ones such as privacy. This paper answers such criticisms and sets the context for the papers that follow in this nanoeth…Read more
  •  57
    Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology
    with Patrick Lin, James Moor, John Weckert, and Mihail C. Roco
    Wiley. 2007.
    Nanoethics seeks to examine the potential risks and rewards of applications of nanotechnology. This up-to-date anthology gives the reader an introduction to and basic foundation in nanotechnology and nanoethics, and then delves into near-, mid-, and far-term issues. Comprehensive and authoritative, it: - Goes beyond the usual environmental, health, and safety (EHS) concerns to explore such topics as privacy, nanomedicine, human enhancement, global regulation, military, humanitarianism, education…Read more
  • Nanotechnology and human enhancement: A symposium
    Nanoethics: The Ethics of Technologies That Converge at the Nanoscale 2 251-327. 2008.
    Human enhancement, in which nanotechnology is expected to play a major role, continues to be a highly contentious ethical debate, with experts on both sides calling it the single most important issue facing science and society in this brave, new century. This paper is a broad introduction to the symposium herein that explores a range of perspectives related to that debate. We will discuss what human enhancement is and its apparent contrast to therapy; and we will begin to tease apart the myriad …Read more
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    Ethics of Human Enhancement: An Executive Summary (review)
    Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2): 201-212. 2011.
    With multi-year funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), a team of researchers has just released a comprehensive report detailing ethical issues arising from human enhancement (Allhoff et al. 2009). While we direct the interested reader to that (much longer) report, we also thank the editors of this journal for the invitation to provide an executive summary thereof. This summary highlights key results from each section of that report and does so in a self-standing way; in other w…Read more
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    Ethics of Human Enhancement: 25 Questions & Answers
    with Patrick Lin, James Moor, and John Weckert
    Law and Ethics of Human Rights 4 (1). 2010.
    This paper presents the principal findings from a three-year research project funded by the US National Science Foundation on ethics of human enhancement technologies. To help untangle this ongoing debate, we have organized the discussion as a list of questions and answers, starting with background issues and moving to specific concerns, including: freedom & autonomy, health & safety, fairness & equity, societal disruption, and human dignity. Each question-and-answer pair is largely self-contain…Read more
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    The essays tackle such contentious issues as environmental impact, health dangers, medical benefits, intellectual property, professional code of ethics, privacy ...
  •  20
    Conflicts of Interest, Emoluments, and the Presidency
    with Jonathan Milgrim
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1): 45-67. 2017.
    The past presidential election reinvigorated interest in the applicability of conflict of interest legislation to the executive branch. In § 2, we survey various approaches to conflicts of interest, paying particular attention to 18 U.S.C. § 208. Under 18 U.S.C. § 202, this conflict of interest statute is straightforwardly inapplicable to the President. We then explore the normative foundations of such an exemption in § 3. While these sections are ultimately lenient, we go on to consider the Emo…Read more
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    This book review responds to George Lucas's Ethics and Cyber Warfare: The Quest for Responsible Security in an Age of Digital Warfare, laying out the structure of the work as well as highlighting areas of strength.
  •  9
    The Asia-Pacific Chapter of the International Society for Military Ethics
    with Shannon Ford and Adam Henschke
    Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2): 118-120. 2017.
  •  11
    Conflicts of Interest, Emoluments, and the Presidency in advance
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy. forthcoming.
  • Germ-Line Genetic Enhancement and Rawlsian Primary Goods
    Journal of Evolution and Technology 18 (1): 10-26. 2008.
    Genetic interventions raise a host of moral issues and, of its various species, germ-line genetic enhancement is the most morally contentious. This paper surveys various arguments against germ-line enhancement and attempts to demonstrate their inadequacies. A positive argument is advanced in favor of certain forms of germ-line enhancements, which holds that they are morally permissible if and only if they augment Rawlsian primary goods, either directly or by facilitating their acquisition.
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    Risk, Precaution, and Emerging Technologies
    Law and Ethics of Human Rights 3 (2). 2009.
    This paper explores a framework for thinking about risks inherent in emerging technologies; given uncertainty about the magnitude—or even nature—of those risks, deliberation about those technologies is challenged. §1 develops a conceptual framework for risk, and §2 integrates that conception into cost-benefit analysis. Given uncertainty, we are often pushed toward precautionary approaches, and such approaches are explored in §3. These first three sections are largely literature review, and then …Read more
  •  5
    Germ-line Genetic Enhancements and Rawlsian Primary Goods
    Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement): 217-230. 2007.
    Genetic interventions raise a host of moral issues and, of its various species, germ-line genetic enhancement is the most morally contentious. This paper surveys various arguments against germ-line enhancement and attempts to demonstrate their inadequacies. A positive argument is advanced in favor of certain forms of germ-line enhancements, which holds that they are morally permissible if and only if they augment Rawlsian primary goods, either directly or by facilitating their acquisition.
  •  5
    The Affordable Care Act Decision: Philosophical and Legal Implications (edited book)
    with Hall Mark
    Routledge. 2014.
    Interest in NFIB v. Sebelius has been extraordinarily high, from as soon as the legislation was passed, through lower court rulings, the Supreme Court’s grant of certiorari, and the decision itself, both for its substantive holdings and the purported behind-the-scene dynamics. Legal blogs exploded with analysis, bioethicists opined on our collective responsibilities, and philosophers tackled concepts like ‘coercion’ and the activity/inactivity distinction. This volume aims to bring together scho…Read more
  • Whiskey and Philosophy (edited book)
    Wiley. 2009.
    From the Back Cover "After decades of cut-and-paste offerings on the subject, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in whisk(e)y—whether single malt, bourbon, or anything else—and all that makes it truly unique." —Jim McEwan, Production Director, Bruichladdich Distillery "Does being a philosopher require an appreciation of good whiskey or does having an appreciation of good whiskey make one philosophical? Whichever is the case, Whiskey & Philosophy makes for a thought-provoking and thir…Read more