•  60
    Interrupting Derrida
    Routledge. 2000.
    One of the most significant contemporary thinkers in continental philosophy, Jacques Derrida’s work continues to attract heated commentary among philosophers, literary critics, social and cultural theorists, architects and artists. This major new work by world renowned Derrida scholar and translator, Geoffrey Bennington, presents incisive new readings of both Derrida and interpretations of his work. Part one sets out Derrida’s work as a whole and examines its relevance to, and ‘interruption’ of,…Read more
  •  48
    Handshake
    Derrida Today 1 (2): 167-184. 2008.
    How might Derrida be said to greet Jean-Luc Nancy in Le Toucher? What kind of handshake does he offer? Derrida explicitly mentions the handshake at the very centre of his book, in the tangent devoted to Merleau-Ponty. A reading of this moment reveals an exemplary case of what happens when Derrida reads apparently ‘fraternal’ texts, and opens up further levels of difference. What then if we consider Nancy's response to Derrida, when the recipient of the handshake shakes back? By examining Nancy's…Read more
  •  46
    The Fall of Sovereignty
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2): 395-406. 2006.
    Reflecting on the fall or failure of sovereignty, this essay considers Derrida’s recent work under the heading of auto-immunity, and develops some consequences of that work, first of all in the political sphere (especially around democracy), but also some more general consequences around conceptuality itself
  •  35
    Post-Structuralism and the Question of History (edited book)
    with Derek Attridge and Robert Young
    Cambridge University Press. 1987.
    Recent developments in literary theory, such as structuralism and deconstruction, have come under attack for neglecting history, while historically-based approaches have been criticized for failing to take account of the problems inherent in their methodological foundations. This collection of essays is unique in that it focuses on the relation between post-structuralism and historical (especially Marxist) literary theory and criticism. The volume includes a deconstructive reading of Marx, essay…Read more
  •  34
    Jacques Derrida (edited book)
    University of Chicago Press. 1993.
    This extraordinary book offers a clear and compelling biography of Jacques Derrida along with one of Derrida's strangest and most unexpected texts. Geoffrey Bennington's account of Derrida leads the reader through the philosopher's familiar yet widely misunderstood work on language and writing to the less familiar themes of signature, sexual difference, law, and affirmation. In an unusual and unprecedented "dialogue," Derrida responds to Bennington's text by interweaving Bennington's text with s…Read more
  •  33
    Superanus
    Theory and Event 8 (1). 2004.
  •  32
    Rigor; or, stupid uselessness
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1): 20-38. 2012.
    In his seminars on the death penalty, Derrida consistently describes Kant's arguments in favor of capital punishment as “rigorous” and explicitly relates that rigor to the mechanisms of execution and the subsequent rigor mortis of the corpse. ‘Rigor’ has also often been a contested term in descriptions of deconstruction: different commentators have either deplored or celebrated the presence or the absence of rigor in Derrida's work. Derrida himself uses the term a good deal throughout his career…Read more
  •  28
    For Better and for Worse (There Again...)
    Diacritics 38 (1/2): 92-103. 2008.
    This article maps, across a wide range of works, the coordinates of Derrida's thinking of democracy and its relevance to a series of crucial concepts, from difference to autoimmunity. Distinguishing Derrida's idea of a “democracy to come” from the Kantian ideal, Bennington links it to Aristotle's insistence upon multiplicity and to a thinking of deviance and perversion, an appropriately deconstructive logic for thinking an absence of telos in democracy to come
  •  25
  •  24
    Rephrasing the Freudian Unconscious: Lyotard's Affect-Phrase"Emma."Heidegger and "The Jews."The InhumanLectures D'Enfance (review)
    with Anne Tomiche, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Andreas Michel, Mark S. Roberts, and Rachel Bowlby
    Diacritics 24 (1): 42. 1994.
  •  19
    Geoffrey Bennington
    Rue Descartes 48 (2): 51-53. 2005.
  •  19
  •  18
    Beastly Sovereignty in advance
    Environmental Philosophy. forthcoming.
  •  18
    Beastly Sovereignty
    Environmental Philosophy 16 (1): 13-33. 2019.
    This article examines three textual moments that might plausibly have found their way into Derrida’s late Beast and Sovereign seminars, but that Derrida appears to avoid or overlook. Aristotle’s discussion in the Politics of the “One Best Man” scenario is placed in the context of his earlier characterizations of the naturally apolitical man as akin either to a beast or to a god; Bataille’s late descriptions of sovereignty as a kind of self-perverting hyperbolic structure are juxtaposed with some…Read more
  •  16
    Aesthetics Interrupted: the Art of Deconstruction
    Oxford Literary Review 36 (1): 19-35. 2014.
    The principle whereby any bit of deconstruction brings with it all of deconstruction must affect the philosophical understanding of art usually subsumed under the title ‘aesthetics’. There can in principle be no deconstructive aesthetics (any more than there could be a deconstructive ethics or a deconstructive epistemology. Aesthetics in general is mortgaged to sensory perception, and from very early Derrida ‘perception does not exist’. Whence his interest in blinking, blindness and the trait of…Read more
  •  16
    Political Animals
    Diacritics 39 (2): 21-35. 2009.
  •  14
    Introduction Someone comes and says something. Without really needing to think, I understand what is said, refer it without difficulty to familiar codes, ...
  •  13
    Circumcising Confession: Derrida, Autobiography, Judaism"Circumfession" (review)
    with Jill Robbins and Jacques Derrida
    Diacritics 25 (4): 20. 1995.
  •  12
    Outside Language
    Oxford Literary Review 11 (1): 189-212. 1989.
  •  11
    Dust
    Oxford Literary Review 34 (1): 25-49. 2012.
    The motif of dust, especially in Richard II, is foregrounded as a complex figure of the deconstruction of sovereignty in Shakespeare.
  •  11
    For Better and for Worse : DerridaJacques
    Diacritics 38 (1): 92-103. 2008.
    This article maps, across a wide range of works, the coordinates of Derrida's thinking of democracy and its relevance to a series of crucial concepts, from difference to autoimmunity. Distinguishing Derrida's idea of a “democracy to come” from the Kantian ideal, Bennington links it to Aristotle's insistence upon multiplicity and to a thinking of deviance and perversion, an appropriately deconstructive logic for thinking an absence of telos in democracy to come
  •  11
    Kant’s Open Secret
    Theory, Culture and Society 28 (7-8): 26-40. 2011.
    It is argued that Kant’s claimed reconciliation of politics and ethics in the Appendix to ‘Perpetual Peace’ founders on an irreducible element of secrecy that no amount of ‘publicity’ could ever dissipate. This shows up figuratively in images of veiling, and more especially in the paradoxical ‘very transparent veil’ associated with British politics in a footnote to ‘The Contest of Faculties’. This figure suggests that the structure of the ‘public’ itself involves a kind of transcendental secrecy…Read more
  •  10
    Teleanalysis
    Paragraph 36 (2): 270-285. 2013.
    The telephone is taken as a privileged figure for discussing the relationship between Cixous and Derrida, particularly as it figures in some of Cixous's late work, and especially Hyperdream. It is suggested that the telephonic relation essentially involves interruption as well connection, and that this structure leads to reformulations of issues such as possibility and impossibility, life and death.
  •  10
    Forget to remember, remember to forget: Sade avec Kant
    Paragraph 23 (1): 75-86. 2000.
  •  9
    Hap
    Oxford Literary Review 36 (2): 170-174. 2014.
  •  9
    Book reviews (review)
    British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4): 375-377. 1989.