•  123
    Faith Without Religion, Religion Without Faith: Kant and Hegel on Religion
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3): 365-383. 2003.
    The World, understood as a system of meaningful relations, is for Hegel the exclusive product of the human mind. In this, Hegel stands together with Kant in direct opposition to the Christian metaphysical tradition, according to which reality reflects God's ideas. For both Kant and Hegel, faith and religion therefore acquire new meaning. Yet, that meaning is just as different for each with respect to the other as it is for both with respect to the Christian tradition. This paper explores these d…Read more
  •  87
    Metaphysics and history in Hegel
    Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (1): 124-132. 1996.
  •  51
    Memories of H. S. Harris, Mentor and Friend
    The Owl of Minerva 38 (1/2): 5-6. 2006.
  •  46
    The Young Hegelians; An Anthology
    The Owl of Minerva 16 (1): 80-83. 1984.
    It is not just rhetoric to ask why we should still be reading the Young Hegelians today. In spite of their commitment to action, their influence on the politics of the times was marginal at best; and even as philosophers, the movement of thought which they represented was all but dead by 1848. Now that we read them at a distance of over a century, it is clear that for once at least the fate meted out by circumstances was well deserved. The writings of the Young Hegelians appear painfully thin in…Read more
  •  45
    Despite the radically different interests that motivate Emil Fackenheim’s and Henry Harris’s respective interpretations of Hegel, the two have significant points of commonality. They in fact come the closest precisely at points where they seem to differ most. The need and the possibility of ‘reconciliation’ is the theme that animates both interpretations, and both also agree in their assessment of Hegel’s treatment of ‘evil.’ There are nevertheless crucial differences separating the two, which t…Read more
  •  41
    Briefe über die Kantische Philosophie (review)
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2): 251-252. 2010.
    Now that the edition of Fichte's works is complete, and those of Hegel's and Jacobi's practically complete, it is comforting to see that the edition of Reinhold's works, begun in 1983 with a first volume of his correspondence, but subsequently dormant, has finally been resumed in earnest. The two books under review are Reinhold's Letters on Kantian Philosophy that make up the two parts of the second of the twelve volumes now planned for the edition. An editorial board is supervising the project,…Read more
  •  39
    Karin de Boer, On Hegel: The Sway of the Negative (review)
    Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (1). 2011.
  •  38
    International Fichte Congress in Jena
    The Owl of Minerva 26 (1): 108-108. 1994.
    An International Fichte Congress was held at the Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat in Jena, September 26 to October 1, 1994, under the auspices of the Internationale Johann-Gottlieb-Fichte-Gesellschaft, in celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Wissenschaftslehre. Participants came from all corners of Eastern and Western Europe, Canada, Japan, and the United States. Well over one hundred papers were read on all aspects of Fichte’s philosophy and Fichte’s heritage. Among the participants from N…Read more
  •  37
    An Interpretation of the Logic of Hegel
    The Owl of Minerva 16 (2): 221-224. 1985.
    It is difficult to pass a simple judgment on this latest commentary on Hegel’s Logic. Its aim, as stated in the preface
  •  37
    Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2008.
  •  36
    Consciousness and Reality: Hegel’s Philosophy of Subjectivity (review)
    The Owl of Minerva 9 (1): 2-5. 1977.
    The reader of Joseph Navickas’s recent book will be disappointed if he expects the author to keep the promise made in the note on the back cover: “The book combines a textual analysis with a new constructive interpretation of the Phenomenology.” And the note goes on to say, “The complete working out of the notion of subjectivity requires a re-examination of the phenomenological transitions and a re-investigation of some allegedly insignificant achievements of the subject.” In point of fact there…Read more
  •  36
    Das Problem der Subjektivitat in Hegels Logik, Hegel-Studien (review)
    The Owl of Minerva 11 (1): 1-6. 1979.
    Heinz Kimmerle’s dating in 1967 of the Jena writings [“Zur Chronologie von Hegels Jenaer Schriften”, Hegel-Studien, 4, 125–176.] which definitely places at 1804–05 the fragment of a Reinschrift on Logic, Metaphysics and Philosophy of Nature previously thought to belong, on the authority of Rosenkranz, to the earlier Frankfurt period, throws a new light on the development of Hegel’s thought during the crucial Jena years. The fact that, throughout that period, Hegel was so much concerned with the …Read more
  •  36
    In this comment on Firestone and Jacobs’s book, In Defense of Kant’s Religion, I take issue with the authors’ strategy in demonstrating that it is possibleto positively incorporate religion and theology into Kant’s critical corpus, and their intention to focus on the coherence of Kant’s theory without necessarily recommending it for Christianity. Regarding, I argue that in pursuing their strategy the authors ignore the fact that Kant has transposed what appear to be traditional religious doctrin…Read more
  •  36
    Hegel
    The Owl of Minerva 29 (1): 91-95. 1997.
  •  36
    On Hegel’s Logic, Fragments of a Commentary (review)
    The Owl of Minerva 14 (1): 1-6. 1982.
    This is good news for those of us who have tried for years to teach Hegel’s Logic only to discover each time that by the end of term we have not gone past the first few pages. We have finally a book on which we can rely to lead our students through the intricacies of at least some of its sections. Burbidge’s handling of the parts of the Logic which he has singled out for his commentary is detailed, lucid, accurate, and penetrating. For this reason alone his book will no doubt become standard ref…Read more
  •  36
    Report
    The Owl of Minerva 35 (1-2): 109-109. 2003.
  •  35
    Factual Necessity: On H. S. Harris and Weltgeist
    The Owl of Minerva 31 (2): 131-153. 2000.
  •  35
    Two conferences recently held in Europe, one on Reinhold and the other on Jacobi, reflect this new development. Both testify to the present high degree of maturity reached by the scholarship on the subject. In both, the two philosophers finally emerge as figures spanning the distance between the late Aufklärung and the nineteenth century. In some respects, Jacobi and Reinhold are closer in mental attitudes to our contemporary world than any of the idealists. So far as the present writer is conce…Read more
  •  35
    The Tenth Biennial Meeting of the Hegel Society of America
    The Owl of Minerva 20 (1): 114-115. 1988.
    The meeting was held in Chicago from Friday, October 7 to Sunday, October 9, 1988, and was hosted by Loyola University. About 80 members and friends of the Society attended. The topic of discussion was the greater Logic.
  •  33
    The theologians of the late German Enlightenment saw in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason a new rational defence of their Christian faith. In fact, Kant's critical theory of meaning and moral law totally subverted the spirit of that faith. This challenging new study examines the contribution made by the Critique of Pure Reason to this change of meaning. George di Giovanni stresses the revolutionary character of Kant's critical thought but also reveals how this thought was being held hostage to unwa…Read more
  •  29
    Paragraphs 20 and 26 of the Transcendental Deduction
    Idealistic Studies 10 (n/a): 131. 1980.
    Whether transcendental arguments are possible or not is a question that has received wide attention in the analytical literature of recent years. It is important to distinguish carefully, however, between Kant’s own Transcendental Deduction and the kind of reasoning which has lately been dubbed “transcendental.” Eva Schaper has accurately defined the difference some years ago. The “transcendental arguments” to which we have recently been accustomed are arguments that seek to establish the logica…Read more
  •  28
    The Denver Meeting of the North American Fichte Society
    The Owl of Minerva 24 (2): 253-253. 1993.
    The second biennial meeting of the North American Fichte Society was held at the University of Denver on March 19-23, 1993. Conveners were Daniel Breazeale of the University of Kentucky and Tom Rockmore of Duquesne University. Twenty-one members attended from the United States, Canada, and Switzerland. Sixteen papers were read over four sessions on all aspects of Fichte’s thought and its reception. The local arrangements by Jere Surber were excellent. It was decided to meet again in two years at…Read more
  •  28
    There is no doubt that the Philosophy of Nature constituted in Hegel’s mind an integral part of his system. Even in the early years of collaboration with Schelling at Jena, when Hegel’s contribution was to be the formulation of a logic consistent with Schelling’s new idealism, Hegel repeatedly produced sketches of a theory of nature. Though that early creative period in fact culminated with the Phenomenology of Spirit, a Philosophy of Nature eventually found its canonical place in the Encycloped…Read more
  •  27
    A Reply to Professor Burbidge
    The Owl of Minerva 15 (2): 240-240. 1984.
  •  24
    Paragraphs 20 and 26 of the Transcendental Deduction
    Idealistic Studies 10 (2): 131-145. 1980.
    Whether transcendental arguments are possible or not is a question that has received wide attention in the analytical literature of recent years. It is important to distinguish carefully, however, between Kant’s own Transcendental Deduction and the kind of reasoning which has lately been dubbed “transcendental.” Eva Schaper has accurately defined the difference some years ago. The “transcendental arguments” to which we have recently been accustomed are arguments that seek to establish the logica…Read more