•  11
    Resisting Scientific Realism. By K. Brad Wray
    International Philosophical Quarterly 59 (2): 237-239. 2019.
  • In the Regulae Descartes establishes a distinction between the imperfectly understood problems of science and the perfectly understood problems of mathematics. His goal is to translate the former into the latter. I focus upon the still imperfectly understood relationship between the Regulae and Cartesian science. I show that the Regulae can be used as a tool for understanding Cartesian texts, and that the content of the Regulae continued to inform Cartesian thinking long after the hope of establ…Read more
  •  25
    A Beginner’s Guide to Descartes’s Meditations
    International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4): 548-550. 2008.
  •  11
    Science and Spirituality: Making Room for Faith in the Age of Science (review)
    International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4): 512-513. 2010.
  •  7
    The Sense of Space
    Review of Metaphysics 59 (3): 665-666. 2006.
    The book consists of two major parts of three chapters apiece which are framed between: an introduction, which succinctly explains the primacy of the phenomenological dimension of depth, which concerns the distance between ourselves and things prior to any quantitative or inferential objectivization of experience; and a conclusion, which deals with some of the ethical implications stemming from our phenomenological construction of space. The focus of part 1 is to present the sense of the body as…Read more
  • A Beginner’s Guide to Descartes’s Meditations (review)
    International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4): 548-550. 2008.
  •  158
    The Uncertainty Principle and the Problem of God
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78 107-117. 2004.
    This paper considers the relationship between quantum uncertainty and the problem of God. Among the issues considered are the existence and essence ofGod, divine action, human freedom, and personal identity. In recent discussions concerning the relative merits of science and religion, thinkers like Ian Barbourand John Haught have suggested several such credible, albeit tentative, connections between the two on the basis of the epistemological limit imposed upon human knowledge by the Heisenberg …Read more
  •  9
    Descartes’s Translation Problem
    International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2): 187-202. 2005.
    While attempting to work out the methodological difficulties of the Regulae ad Directionem Ingenii, Descartes encountered a “translation problem.” Clear and distinct intertheoretic translation between the mathematical domains of algebra and geometry couldnot always be achieved. As a result, I will argue that Descartes feels compelled to metaphysically reconstruct the logistics of cognition. Additionally, I will show how Descartes’s strong commitment concerning the role of analogy in the confirma…Read more
  • The Difficult Good: A Thomistic Approach to Moral Confl ict and Human Happiness—Daniel McInerny (review)
    International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3): 371-373. 2007.
  •  3
    The Uncertainty Principle and the Problem of God
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78 107-117. 2004.
    This paper considers the relationship between quantum uncertainty and the problem of God. Among the issues considered are the existence and essence ofGod, divine action, human freedom, and personal identity. In recent discussions concerning the relative merits of science and religion, thinkers like Ian Barbourand John Haught have suggested several such credible, albeit tentative, connections between the two on the basis of the epistemological limit imposed upon human knowledge by the Heisenberg …Read more
  •  15
    Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality
    Review of Metaphysics 59 (1): 207-208. 2005.
    In Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality Eric Watkins embarks upon a revision of the standard anti-Humean interpretation of Kant's theory of causality. Like Caesar's Gaul the book is divided into three parts, each consisting of two chapters. The overarching thesis of the book, as fleshed out in part two, is that Kant's Critical treatment of causality, which emerges by a close reading of both the second and third analogies of experience within the Transcendental Logic's Analytic of Principles, sh…Read more