•  7
    Aquinas on Passive Powers
    Vivarium 59 (1-2): 33-51. 2021.
    Aquinas thinks that if we want to understand causal interactions between material substances, we cannot focus exclusively on agents and their active powers. In his view, there are also passive potencies which enable material substances to be acted upon. He claims that for every type of active potency, there is a corresponding passive potency. This article aims to clarify Aquinas’s views about the passive potencies of material substances. It recovers his thinking on three key questions: first, wh…Read more
  •  7
    Aquinas on the Intension and Remission of Accidental Forms
    Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 7 (1). 2019.
    The metaphysics underlying differences in degree of qualitative intensity was widely debated in the medieval period. Medieval Aristotelians agreed that subjects possess qualities in virtue of inherent accidental forms. Yet, there was considerable disagreement about what happens at the level of form when a quality increases or decreases in its intensity. For instance, what happens when a pot of water on the stove gets hotter? Is the water’s previous form of heat replaced by a new one, or does the…Read more
  •  16
    What Is an Action? Peter Auriol vs. Thomas Aquinas on the Metaphysics of Causality
    Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6. 2019.
    It is commonplace in mainstream analytic philosophy to conceive of causation as a relation between events. On this picture, both causes and effects belong to the same ontological category—event—and in order to have an instance of causation you need at least two of them. ‘Dropping’ causes ‘breaking,’ ‘cutting’ causes ‘splitting,’ and ‘raising my arm’ causes it ‘to be raised.’ It is well-known that philosophers from the ancient through the early modern period conceived of the relata of causation q…Read more
  •  39
    Aquinas’ Ontology of Transeunt Causal Activity
    Vivarium 56 (1-2): 47-82. 2018.
    This paper reconstructs and analyzes Thomas Aquinas’ intriguing views on transeunt causal activity, which have been the subject of an interpretive debate spanning from the fifteenth century up until the present. In his Physics commentary, Aquinas defends the Aristotelian positions that the actualization of an agent’s active potential is the motion that it causes in its patient and action and passion are the same motion. Yet, in other texts, Aquinas claims that action differs from passion and “ac…Read more
  •  27
    An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts (review)
    American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4): 814-817. 2010.
  •  38
    Thomas Aquinas on Truths About Nonbeings
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80 101-113. 2006.
    In De veritate I.2, Thomas Aquinas claims that “to every true act of understanding there must correspond some being and likewise to every being there corresponds a true act of understanding.” For Aquinas, the ratio of truth consists in a conformity between intellect and being. This account of truth, however, doesnot appear to allow for a certain class of truths, namely those that are about nonbeings. Many think that it is true that ‘no chimeras exist,’ that ‘blindness can becaused by exposure to…Read more
  •  12
    Aquinas and Scotus on the Source of Contingency
    Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 2 (1). 2014.
    Both Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus were committed to the view that effects with a contingent modality exist in the created world. This is to say that there are things that could have been otherwise. This chapter explores their respective accounts of the ontological reason for why there are effects with a contingent modality. Leibniz considered Aquinas’s and Scotus’s views on this issue, concluding that they were in fundamental disagreement about the ‘root of contingency.’ This chapter firs…Read more
  •  58
    This paper discusses Scotus’s view of how God knows sins by analyzing texts from his discussions of God’s permission of sin and predestination. I show that Scotus departed from his standard theory of how God knows contingents when explaining how God knows sins. God cannot know sins by knowing a first-order act of his will, as he knows other contingents according to Scotus, since God does not directly will sins. I suggest that Scotus’s recognition that his standard theory of God’s knowledge of co…Read more
  •  309
    Thomas Aquinas on the perpetual truth of essential propositions
    History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (3): 197-213. 2010.
  •  46
    Peter Olivi's Rejection of God's Concurrence with Created Causes
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4): 655-679. 2014.
    The relationship between divine and created causality was widely discussed in medieval and early modern philosophy. Contemporary scholars of these discussions typically stake out three possible positions: occasionalism, concurrentism, and mere-conservationism. It is regularly claimed that virtually no medieval thinker adopted the final view which denies that God is an immediate active cause of creaturely actions. The main aim of this paper is to further understanding of the medieval causality de…Read more
  •  27
    Thomas Bradwardine on God and the Foundations of Modality
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2). 2013.
    (2013). Thomas Bradwardine on God and the Foundations of Modality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 368-380. doi: 10.1080/09608788.2012.689754
  •  12
    Thomas Aquinas on Truths About Nonbeings
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80 101-113. 2006.
    In De veritate I.2, Thomas Aquinas claims that “to every true act of understanding there must correspond some being and likewise to every being there corresponds a true act of understanding.” For Aquinas, the ratio of truth consists in a conformity between intellect and being. This account of truth, however, doesnot appear to allow for a certain class of truths, namely those that are about nonbeings. Many think that it is true that ‘no chimeras exist,’ that ‘blindness can becaused by exposure to…Read more