•  136
    Why Alief is Not a Legitimate Psychological Category
    Journal of Philosophical Research 36 371-389. 2011.
    We defend the view that belief is a psychological category against a recent attempt to recast it as a normative one. Tamar Gendler has argued that to properly understand how beliefs function in the regulation and production of action, we need to contrast beliefs with a class of psychological states and processes she calls “aliefs.” We agree with Gendler that affective states as well as habits and instincts deserve more attention than they receive in the contemporary philosophical psychology lite…Read more
  •  117
    More troubles for epiphenomenalism
    Philosophia 37 (1): 109-112. 2008.
    I have argued that to say qualia are epiphenomenal is to say a world without qualia would be physically identical to a world with qualia. Dan Cavedon-Taylor has offered an alternative interpretation of the commitments of qualia epiphenomenalism according to which qualia cause beliefs and those beliefs can and do cause changes to the physical world. I argue that neither of these options works for the qualia epiphenomenalist and thus that theory faces far more serious difficulties than has previou…Read more
  •  83
    Why qualia are not epiphenomenal
    Ratio 21 (1). 2008.
    In this article, I give an original objection to Frank Jackson's argument for the conclusion that the subjective, felt properties of experience are causally inert. I show that the very act of asserting the existence of these properties undermines the claim that they are epiphenomenal. If this objection goes through, it is fatal to the argument in question.
  •  53
    Varieties of Shame: An Issue for Workplace Harassment Policy
    Philosophy of Management 6 (3): 87-96. 2008.
    This paper takes seriously the idea that one person in a workplace could cause a co-worker to feel ashamed without realising it. This is because the most widely accepted conception of shame does not adequately explain the eliciting conditions of that emotion. I begin by setting out what I take to be the most common account of shame. Next, I note what predictions we would make about which situations will elicit shame in a subject were we to embrace that conception. I then show that these predicti…Read more
  •  36
    Once upon a time, Aristotelean teleologists studied the natural world, both organic and inorganic, with the goal of revealing the divinely imposed ul- timate purpose of things. Things have changed. Galileo’s mathematization of physics removed Aristotelean final causes from the inorganic part of the natural world: that is a settled matter. Darwin then completed this revolu- tion in the sciences by extending it to the organic part of the natural world. But there is considerable room for disagreeme…Read more
  •  33
    One of the most pervasive and persistent questions in philosophy is the relationship between the natural sciences and traditional philosophical categories such as metaphysics, epistemology and the mind. _Contemporary Philosophical Naturalism and Its Implications _is a unique and valuable contribution to the literature on this issue. It brings together a remarkable collection of highly regarded experts in the field along with some young theorists providing a fresh perspective. This book is notewo…Read more
  •  20
    Why Alief is Not a Legitimate Psychological Category
    with Bana Bashour
    Journal of Philosophical Research 36 371-389. 2011.
    We defend the view that belief is a psychological category against a recent attempt to recast it as a normative one. Tamar Gendler has argued that to properly understand how beliefs function in the regulation and production of action, we need to contrast beliefs with a class of psychological states and processes she calls “aliefs.” We agree with Gendler that affective states as well as habits and instincts deserve more attention than they receive in the contemporary philosophical psychology lite…Read more
  •  6
    Sympathy for Whom? Smith's Reply to Hume
    Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (2): 212-232. 2016.
  •  5
    Varieties of Shame: An Issue for Workplace Harassment Policy
    Philosophy of Management 6 (3): 87-96. 2008.
    This paper takes seriously the idea that one person in a workplace could cause a co-worker to feel ashamed without realising it. This is because the most widely accepted conception of shame does not adequately explain the eliciting conditions of that emotion. I begin by setting out what I take to be the most common account of shame. Next, I note what predictions we would make about which situations will elicit shame in a subject were we to embrace that conception. I then show that these predicti…Read more
  •  1
    Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk: A case-control study
    with N. Johnson, F. Dudbridge, N. Orr, L. Gibson, M. E. Jones, M. J. Schoemaker, E. J. Folkerd, B. P. Haynes, J. L. Hopper, M. C. Southey, G. S. Dite, C. Apicella, M. K. Schmidt, A. Broeks, L. J. Van'T. Veer, F. Atsma, K. Muir, A. Lophatananon, P. A. Fasching, M. W. Beckmann, A. B. Ekici, S. P. Renner, E. Sawyer, I. Tomlinson, M. Kerin, N. Miller, B. Burwinkel, F. Marme, A. Schneeweiss, C. Sohn, P. Guénel, T. Truong, E. Cordina, F. Menegaux, S. E. Bojesen, B. G. Nordestgaard, H. Flyger, R. Milne, M. P. Zamora, J. I. A. Perez, J. Benitez, L. Bernstein, H. Anton-Culver, A. Ziogas, C. C. Dur, H. Brenner, V. Arndt, A. K. Dieffenbach, A. Meindl, J. Heil, C. R. Bartram, R. K. Schmutzler, H. Brauch, C. Justenhoven, Y. D. Ko, H. Nevanlinna, T. A. Muranen, K. Aittomäki, C. Blomqvist, K. Matsuo, T. Dörk, N. V. Bogdanova, N. N. Antonenkova, A. Lindblom, A. Mannermaa, V. Kataja, V. M. Kosma, J. M. Hartikainen, G. Chenevix-Trench, J. Beesley, A. H. Wu, D. Van den Berg, C. C. Tseng, and D. Lambrechts
    © 2014 Johnson et al.Introduction: We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism, which maps to the CYP3A locus, was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age ≤50 years. Methods: We further investigated the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk in a large case control study of 47,346 cases and 47,570 controls from 52 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Associ…Read more
  • Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk: a case-control study
    with N. Johnson, F. Dudbridge, N. Orr, L. Gibson, M. E. Jones, M. J. Schoemaker, E. J. Folkerd, B. P. Haynes, J. L. Hopper, M. C. Southey, G. S. Dite, C. Apicella, M. K. Schmidt, A. Broeks, L. J. Van'T. Veer, F. Atsma, K. Muir, A. Lophatananon, P. A. Fasching, M. W. Beckmann, A. B. Ekici, S. P. Renner, E. Sawyer, I. Tomlinson, M. Kerin, N. Miller, B. Burwinkel, F. Marme, A. Schneeweiss, C. Sohn, P. Guénel, T. Truong, E. Cordina, F. Menegaux, S. E. Bojesen, B. G. Nordestgaard, H. Flyger, R. Milne, M. P. Zamora, J. I. Arias Perez, J. Benitez, L. Bernstein, H. Anton-Culver, A. Ziogas, C. Clarke Dur, H. Brenner, V. Arndt, A. K. Dieffenbach, A. Meindl, J. Heil, C. R. Bartram, R. K. Schmutzler, H. Brauch, C. Justenhoven, Y. D. Ko, H. Nevanlinna, T. A. Muranen, K. Aittomäki, C. Blomqvist, K. Matsuo, T. Dörk, N. V. Bogdanova, N. N. Antonenkova, A. Lindblom, A. Mannermaa, V. Kataja, V. M. Kosma, J. M. Hartikainen, G. Chenevix-Trench, J. Beesley, A. H. Wu, D. Van den Berg, C. C. Tseng, and D. Lambrechts
    INTRODUCTION: We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism, which maps to the CYP3A locus, was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age ≤50 years.METHODS: We further investigated the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk in a large case control study of 47,346 cases and 47,570 controls from 52 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Geno…Read more
  • Fear and Loathing in Deliberation: One Connection Between Emotion and Rationality
    Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2003.
    It is widely believed that rational deliberation must be dispassionate. I argue that this is a mistake. The traditional divide between intellectual and emotional faculties is a false dichotomy. In my analysis, I focus on the two emotions that seem most in tension with rationality---fear and anger---and explain how they bring resources to decision-making that go beyond the capacities of bare reason. ;I critique two distinct historically significant arguments for the thesis that emotions have no l…Read more