•  5
    In Defence of Different Voices
    Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 7 (2): 149-177. 2020.
    Louise Antony draws a now well-known distinction between two explanatory models for researching and addressing the issue of women’s underrepresentation in philosophy – the ‘Different Voices’ and ‘Perfect Storm’ models – and argues that, in view of PS’s considerably higher social value, DV should be abandoned. We argue that Antony misunderstands the feminist framework that she takes to underpin DV, and we reconceptualise DV in a way that aligns with a proper understanding of the metaphilosophical…Read more
  •  5
    Diversity in Philosophy
    Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 7 (2): 113-116. 2020.
  •  1
    In Defence of Different Voices
    Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences. forthcoming.
    Helen Beebee, Anne-Marie McCallion ABSTRACT: Louise Antony draws a now well-known distinction between two explanatory models for researching and addressing the issue of women’s underrepresentation in philosophy – the ‘Different Voices’ and ‘Perfect Storm’ models – and argues that, in view of PS’s considerably higher social value, DV should be abandoned. We argue …
  •  4
    Diversity in Philosophy: Editors’ Introduction
    Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences. forthcoming.
    Helen Beebee, Anne-Marie McCallion Download PDF.
  •  8
    The life-long correspondence of David K. Lewis, one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, reveals the development, breadth, and depth of his philosophy in its historical context. The first of this two volume collection of letters focuses on his contributions to metaphysics, arguably where he made his greatest impact.
  •  7
    The life-long correspondence of David K. Lewis, one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, reveals the development, breadth, and depth of his philosophy in its historical context. The second of this two volume collection focuses on his contributions to philosophical questions of language, mind, and epistemology.
  •  23
    In an outline of a paper found amongst his philosophical papers and correspondence after his untimely death in 2001—“Nihil Obstat: An Analysis of Ability,” reproduced in this volume—David Lewis sketched a new compatibilist account of abilities, according to which someone is able to A if and only if there is no obstacle to their A-ing, where an obstacle is a ‘robust preventer’ of their A-ing. In this paper, we provide some background context for Lewis’s outline, a section-by-section commentary, a…Read more
  •  3
    On David Hume: A Preface to the Special Issue
    History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 13 (1): 9-15. 2010.
  •  2
    The Discourse Interview
    with David Mossley
    Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies 7 (2): 15-30. 2008.
  • Introductory Formal Logic
    Discourse: Learning and Teaching in Philosophical and Religious Studies 3 (1): 53-62. 2003.
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    Scientific Essentialism
    Mind 113 (450): 334-340. 2004.
  •  22
    Causal Contribution in War
    Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (3): 364-377. 2020.
  •  11
    Legal Responsibility and Scalar Causation (review)
    with Michael S. Moore, Dowe Phil, and Stephen Mumford
    Jurisprudence 4 (1): 102-137. 2013.
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    Making a Difference presents fifteen original essays on causation and counterfactuals by an international team of experts. Collectively, they represent the state of the art on these topics. The essays in this volume are inspired by the life and work of Peter Menzies, who made a difference in the lives of students, colleagues, and friends. Topics covered include: the semantics of counterfactuals, agency theories of causation, the context-sensitivity of causal claims, structural equation models, m…Read more
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    Editorial
    Journal of the American Philosophical Association 4 (1): 1-1. 2018.
  •  2
    Free Will: An Introduction
    Palgrave Macmillan. 2013.
    This comprehensive introductory guide includes discussion of the major contemporary positions on compatibilism and incompatibilism, and of the central arguments that are a focus of the current debate, including the Consequence Argument, manipulation arguments, and Frankfurt's famous argument against the 'Principle of Alternate Possibilities.
  •  184
    Women and Deviance in Philosophy
    In K. Hutchison & F. Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 61--80. 2013.
  •  445
    The Non-Governing Conception of Laws of Nature
    Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 61 (3): 571-594. 2000.
    Recently several thought experiments have been developed which have been alleged to refute the Ramsey-Lewis view of laws of nature. The paper aims to show that two such thought experiments fail to establish that the Ramsey-Lewis view is false, since they presuppose a conception of laws of nature that is radically at odds with the Humean conception of laws embodied by the Ramsey-Lewis view. In particular, the thought experiments presuppose that laws of nature govern the behavior of objects. The p…Read more
  •  54
    Chance-changing causal processes
    In Phil Dowe & Paul Noordhof (eds.), Cause and Chance, Routledge. pp. 39-57. 2004.
    Scepticism concerning the idea of causation being linked to contingent chance-raising is articulated in Beebee’s challenging chapter. She suggests that none of these approaches will avoid the consequence that spraying defoliant on a weed is a cause of the weed’s subsequent health. We will always be able to abstract away enough of the healthy plant processes so all that’s left is the causal chain involving defoliation and health. In those circumstances, there will be contingent chance-raising. Be…Read more
  •  305
    Seeing causing
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3): 257-280. 2003.
    Singularists about causation often claim that we can have experiences as of causation. This paper argues that regularity theorists need not deny that claim; hence the possibility of causal experience is no objection to regularity theories of causation. The fact that, according to a regularity theorist, causal experience requires background theory does not provide grounds for denying that it is genuine experience. The regularity theorist need not even deny that non-inferential perceptual knowledg…Read more
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    Hume Studies Referees, 2007–2008
    with Donald Ainslie, Carla Bagnoli, Donald Baxter, Tom Beauchamp, Martin Bell, Deborah Boyle, John Bricke, Deborah Brown, and Dorothy Coleman
    Hume Studies 34 (2): 323-324. 2008.
  •  248
    Necessary Connections and the Problem of Induction
    Noûs 45 (3): 504-527. 2011.
    In this paper Beebee argues that the problem of induction, which she describes as a genuine sceptical problem, is the same for Humeans than for Necessitarians. Neither scientific essentialists nor Armstrong can solve the problem of induction by appealing to IBE, for both arguments take an illicit inductive step.
  •  441
    Hume’s Two Definitions
    Hume Studies 37 (2): 243-274. 2011.
    Hume's two definitions of causation have caused an extraordinary amount of controversy. The starting point for the controversy is the fact, well known to most philosophy undergraduates, that the two definitions aren't even extensionally equivalent, let alone semantically equivalent. So how can they both be definitions? One response to this problem has been to argue that Hume intends only the first as a genuine definition—an interpretation that delivers a straightforward regularity interpretation…Read more
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  •  5
    Essentialism--roughly, the view that natural kinds have discrete essences, generating truths that are necessary but knowable only _a posteriori_--is an increasingly popular view in the metaphysics of science. At the same time, philosophers of language have been subjecting Kripke’s views about the existence and scope of the necessary _a posteriori_ to rigorous analysis and criticism. Essentialists typically appeal to Kripkean semantics to motivate their radical extension of the realm of the neces…Read more
  •  539
    Causing and Nothingness
    In L. A. Paul, E. J. Hall & J. Collins (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals, Mit Press. pp. 291--308. 2004.
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