American University
Department of Philosophy & Religion
PhD, 1991
Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
Areas of Interest
17th/18th Century Philosophy
  • This dissertation will explore a unique problem in Kant's critical philosophy, thus far not dealt with in the larger perspective it deserves, namely the possibility of judgment, particularly aesthetic judgment in the shadow of reason and understanding. Kant tells us in the Critique of Pure Reason that in the course of human conduct the power of judgment is more important than knowledge and reason , but how this is so he only comes to fully articulate in his culminating critical work, the Critiqu…Read more
  •  19
    Kant’s Eschatology in Zum ewigen Frieden
    Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 2 437-444. 1995.
  •  13
    Hegel and Mallarmé
    Review of Metaphysics 41 (1): 150-152. 1987.
    Janine Langan's Hegel and Mallarmé represents an analysis of Stéphane Mallarmé's pervasive, if "mysterious" Hegelianism which underlies, by the French symbolist's own admission, his total work. The author attempts to demystify the Hegelian substructure in Mallarmé by a careful examination and step-by-step description of the salient Hegelian elements. The latter task is accomplished by de voting a good part of the work to Mallarmé's longest poem "Un coup de dés jamais n'abolira le hasard," which …Read more
  •  6
    In this paper I argue for the "incompleteness thesis" of Kant's General Metaphysics before completing a full analysis of the power of judgment which only occurred in the Critique of Judgment-Power. Kant scholars have argued that Kant's General Metaphysics was completed with the Critique of Pure Reason and the Third Critique added nothing significant to this quest. One of the issues in this paper is to understand Kant's various "transition problems" and their solution to unify knowledge under a …Read more
  •  8
    Irrationalism in Eighteenth Century Aesthetics: A Challenge for Kant
    The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12 23-29. 2007.
    This essay deals with a particularly recalcitrant problem in the history of ideas, that of irrationalism. It emerged to full consciousness in mid-eighteenth century thought. Irrationalism was a logical consequence of individualism which in turn was a direct outcome of the Cartesian self-reflective subject. In time these tendencies produced the "critical" Zeitgeist and the "epoch of taste" during which Kant began thinking about such matters. Like Alfred Bäumler, I argue that irrationalism could n…Read more
  • I argue that once one holds (as Kant does) that the mind is equipped with innate, pre-existing, i.e. a priori structures, one can ask (as materialists or empiricists would), Is there an identifiable source of such structures and what does it imply? Already Schopenhauer, Moses Mendelssohn and others have taken that route of argument, without fully drawing the implications. In this paper I attempt to do so, posing the query: Is Kant's very explicit separation of the transcendent from the transcen…Read more
  •  14
    Kant’s Theory of a Priori Knowledge (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 55 (4): 860-861. 2002.
    Robert Greenberg offers an intricate, highly original reading of Kant’s first Critique on what constitutes the possibility of a priori knowledge. One of the book’s main features, ambitious in scope, is the author’s extensive polemic against mainstream Anglophone approaches to Kant’s position on a priori knowledge. Many of them have, according to Greenberg, fundamentally misunderstood Kant’s theory of transcendental idealism. In particular, Greenberg sees Peter Strawson’s epochmaking classic, The…Read more
  •  14
    Kant's theory of judgment establishes the conceptual framework for understanding the subtle relationships between the experimental scientist, the modern instrument, and nature's atomic particles. The principle of purposiveness which governs judgment has also a role in implicitly guiding modern experimental science. In Part 1 we explore Kant's philosophy of science as he shows how knowledge of material nature and unobservable entities is possible. In Part 2 we examine the way in which Kant's trea…Read more
  •  34
    KANT AND HEGEL FIND THEMSELVES ON SIMILAR PATHS toward their respective goals to give a total account of reality. They share a deep commitment to science, Wissenschaftlichkeit, and raise the question: Where does science begin? Similarly, they answer: It begins with sense knowledge yet it is not founded in the senses. This essay attempts to reflect on, with the aim of cautiously reassessing, the nonsensible, universal features of sense experience from an idealist perspective. A study of the “scie…Read more
  •  33
    Irrationalism in Eighteenth Century Aesthetics
    The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12 23-29. 2007.
    This essay deals with a particularly recalcitrant problem in the history of ideas, that of irrationalism. It emerged to full consciousness in mid-eighteenth century thought. Irrationalism was a logical consequence of individualism which in turn was a direct outcome of the Cartesian self-reflective subject. In time these tendencies produced the "critical" Zeitgeist and the "epoch of taste" during which Kant began thinking about such matters. Like Alfred Bäumler, I argue that irrationalism could n…Read more