•  2
    Managing the mutations: academic misconduct Australia, New Zealand, and the UK
    with Stephen Tee, Steph Allen, and Melanie Birks
    International Journal for Educational Integrity 16 (1). 2020.
    Academic misconduct is a problem of growing concern across the tertiary education sector. While plagiarism has been the most common form of academic misconduct, the advent of software programs to detect plagiarism has seen the problem of misconduct simply mutate. As universities attempt to function in an increasingly complex environment, the factors that contribute to academic misconduct are unlikely to be easily mitigated. A multiple case study approach examined how academic misconduct is perce…Read more
  •  7
    Bush tucker, conversation and rich pictures
    with Douglas L. Morgan
    In J. P. van Gigch & J. McIntyre-Mills (eds.), Volume 1: Rescuing the Enlightenment from Itself, Springer. 2006.
    New York, USA.
  • This work looks at subjects such as tools for transcultural ethical thinking and eco-humanism which reflect the way we live in today's global society.
  •  15
    Wellbeing, mindfulness and the global commons
    Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (7-8): 7-8. 2010.
    As the world becomes hotter and natural disasters increase, the challenge for survival will become greater. We need to become increasingly resilient. This has implications for how we see ourselves, others and the environment. What is consciousness? If it is more than the firing of an assemblage of neurons in our brain , how does it relate to mindfulness? What is the link between mindfulness, wellbeing and the global commons? Where do we -- indeed should we -- draw the lines of inclusion and excl…Read more
  •  24
    Engaging farmers in environmental management through a better understanding of behaviour
    with Peter Gaskell, Julie Ingram, Janet Dwyer, Matt Reed, and Christopher Short
    Agriculture and Human Values 34 (2): 283-299. 2017.
    The United Kingdom’s approach to encouraging environmentally positive behaviour has been three-pronged, through voluntarism, incentives and regulation, and the balance between the approaches has fluctuated over time. Whilst financial incentives and regulatory approaches have been effective in achieving some environmental management behavioural change amongst farmers, ultimately these can be viewed as transient drivers without long-term sustainability. Increasingly, there is interest in ‘nudging’…Read more
  • Lachs, J.-In Love with Life
    Philosophical Books 40 267-267. 1999.