Tempe, Arizona, United States of America
  •  317
    Bridging the Gap
    Teaching Philosophy 31 (2): 151-159. 2008.
    Philosophical clarity is not simply a matter of style; it affects the quality of the thinking and writing and so the level of intellectual rigor. Achieving maximum clarity requires both intellectual and perceptual skills. The intellectual grasp of what philosophical clarity involves motivates writing with greater clarity. The perceptual skill of seeing exactly what we have written enables such improvement to occur. This paper explains a technique used in graduate-level courses to move both sets …Read more
  •  18
    Bridging the Gap
    Teaching Philosophy 31 (2): 151-159. 2008.
    Philosophical clarity is not simply a matter of style; it affects the quality of the thinking and writing and so the level of intellectual rigor. Achieving maximum clarity requires both intellectual and perceptual skills. The intellectual grasp of what philosophical clarity involves motivates writing with greater clarity. The perceptual skill of seeing exactly what we have written enables such improvement to occur. This paper explains a technique used in graduate-level courses to move both sets …Read more
  •  3
    Stereotypes and Moral Oversight in Conflict Resolution: What Are We Teaching?
    Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (4): 513-527. 2002.
    I examine some common trends in ‘conflict management skills’, particularly those focused on practical results, and argue that they involve some moral problems, like the reliance on offensive stereotypes, the censorship of moral language, the promotion of distorted relationships, and sometimes the suppression of basic rights and obligations that constitute non–consequentialist moral constraints on human interactions (including dispute resolution). Since these approaches now appear in educational …Read more
  •  29
    Stereotypes and moral oversight in conflict resolution: What are we teaching?
    Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (4). 2002.
    I examine some common trends in ‘conflict management skills’, particularly those focused on practical results, and argue that they involve some moral problems, like the reliance on offensive stereotypes, the censorship of moral language, the promotion of distorted relationships, and sometimes the suppression of basic rights and obligations that constitute non–consequentialist moral constraints on human interactions (including dispute resolution). Since these approaches now appear in educational …Read more