•  4
    On the Surprising in Science and Logic
    Review of Metaphysics 40 (4). 1987.
    QUINE'S DOCTRINE of the indeterminacy of translation is made possible by the principle of substitution characteristic of extensional logic. The same characteristic makes it impossible, in philosophy of science, to choose among theoretical models no one of which is obviously best suited to explain the facts. Hilary Putnam achieved a sort of closure to the problem of reference in philosophy of science, when he pointed out the implications of the Skolem-Löwenheim theorem. He said that besides the f…Read more
  •  4
    Chauncey Wright
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2008.
  •  1
    Originally published in 1991. Philoponus’ long commentary on Aristotle’s definition of light sets up the major concerns, both in optics and theory of light, that is discussed here. Light was of special interest in Neoplatonism because of its being something incorporeal in the world of natural bodies and therefore had a special role in the philosophical analysis of the interpenetration of bodies and also as a paradigm for the soul-body problem. The material investigated in this book contains much…Read more
  •  16
    Aspects of aristotelian statics in Galileo's dynamics
    Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (4): 645-664. 2000.
    This paper examines geometrical arguments from Galileo's Mechanics and Two New Sciences to discern the influence of the Aristotelian Mechanical Problems on Galileo's dynamics. A common scientific procedure is found in the Aristotelian author's treatment of the balance and lever and in Galileo's rules concerning motion along inclined planes. This scientific procedure is understood as a development of Eudoxan proportional reasoning, as it was used in Eudoxan astronomy rather than simply as it appe…Read more
  •  16
    Aspects of Aristotelian statics in Galileo's dynamics
    Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (4): 645-664. 2000.
    This paper examines geometrical arguments from Galileo's Mechanics and Two New Sciences to discern the influence of the Aristotelian Mechanical Problems on Galileo's dynamics. A common scientific procedure is found in the Aristotelian author's treatment of the balance and lever and in Galileo's rules concerning motion along inclined planes. This scientific procedure is understood as a development of Eudoxan proportional reasoning, as it was used in Eudoxan astronomy rather than simply as it appe…Read more
  •  40
    Dunamis and the Science of Mechanics: Aristotle on Animal Motion
    Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1): 43-67. 2008.
    It is shown that Aristotle’s references to automata in his biological treatises are meant to invoke the principle behind the ancient conception of the lever, i.e. that points on the rotating radius of a circle all move at different speeds proportional to their distances from the center. This principle is mathematical and explains a phenomenon taken as whole. Automata do not signify for him primarily a succession of material movers in contact, the modern model for mechanism. For animal locomotion…Read more
  • In _Aristotle’s Empiricism_, Jean De Groot argues that an important part of Aristotle’s natural philosophy has remained largely unexplored and shows that much of Aristotle’s analysis of natural movement is influenced by the logic and concepts of mathematical mechanics that emerged from late Pythagorean thought. De Groot draws upon the pseudo-Aristotelian_ Physical Problems_ XVI to reconstruct the context of mechanics in Aristotle’s time and to trace the development of kinematic thinking from Arc…Read more
  •  12
    Rethinking the meaning of mechanism in antiquity
    Metascience 21 (3): 699-704. 2012.
  •  15
    Intelligence and the Philosophy of Mind
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80 91-99. 2006.
  •  39
    In the introduction to An Approach to Aristotle’s Physics, David Bolotin presents an exceptionally clear account of the difficulties of making a claim for Aristotle’s natural philosophy as a contemporary teacher about nature. Modern science has repudiated the chief elements of the Aristotelian cosmos—the geocentric universe, the account of projectile motion—and so the contemporary interpreter treats Aristotle as a brilliant expositor of the world “as it appears.” Alternatively, the interpreter m…Read more
  •  8
    The Status and Significance of Aristotle’s Definition of Nature
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 73 99-107. 1999.
  • Form and Succession in Aristotle's “Physics”'
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 1-23. 1994.
  •  42
    A Husserlian Perspective on Empirical Mathematics in Aristotle
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80 91-99. 2006.
    Examples are presented of Aristotle’s use of non-idealized mathematics. Distinctions Husserl makes in Crisis help to delineate the features of this empiricalmathematics, which include the non-persistence of mathematical aspects of things and the selective application of mathematical traits and proper accidents. In antiquity, non-abstracted mathematics was involved with practical sciences that treat motion. The suggestion is made that these sciences were incorporated by Aristotle into natural phi…Read more
  •  10
    Letter to the Editor
    International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (4): 431-433. 2015.
  •  8
    Colloquium 1
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1): 1-23. 1994.
  •  9
    Why Epistemology Is Not Ancient
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2): 181-190. 2015.
    This paper traces the significance of first principles in Greek philosophy to cognitive developments in colonial Greek Italy in the late fifth century BC. Conviction concerning principles comes from the power to make something true by action. Pairing and opposition, the forerunners of metonymy, are shown to structure disparate cultural phenomena—the making of figured numbers, the sundial, and the production, with the aid of device, of fear or panic in the spectators of Greek tragedy. From these …Read more
  •  2
    A Husserlian Perspective on Empirical Mathematics in Aristotle
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80 91-99. 2006.
    Examples are presented of Aristotle’s use of non-idealized mathematics. Distinctions Husserl makes in Crisis help to delineate the features of this empiricalmathematics, which include the non-persistence of mathematical aspects of things and the selective application of mathematical traits and proper accidents. In antiquity, non-abstracted mathematics was involved with practical sciences that treat motion. The suggestion is made that these sciences were incorporated by Aristotle into natural phi…Read more
  •  21
    Modes of Explanation in the Aristotelian Mechanical Problems
    Early Science and Medicine 14 (1-3): 22-42. 2009.
    Scholars have been puzzled by the central argument of MP 1 where the author addresses the basic principle behind the balance and lever. It is not clear what is intended to provide the explanation—the dynamic concepts of force and constraint or the geometrical demonstration. Nor is it clear whether the geometrical part of the argument carries any logical force or has value as a proof. This paper makes a case for the cogency of the argument as a kinematic, not dynamic, account. MP 1 proceeds syste…Read more