• Hegel's End-of-Art Revisited: The Death of God and the Essential Finitude of Artistic Beauty
    Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 1 (48): 77-101. 2020.
    The article re-visits the different scholarly approaches to Hegel's end-of-art scenario, and then proposes a new reading whereby ending and finitude are presented as essential features of beautiful art. The first and most determinant of art's endings is the death of the Christly art object, not representations of Christ, but the actual death of (the son of) God himself as the last classical artwork. The death of God represents the last word in Greco-Roman art, the accomplishment of the beautifu…Read more
  •  2
    1. The Objective Discourse of Science
    In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel, University of Toronto Press. pp. 1-17. 2007.
  •  15
    La jeune fille et la mort : Hegel et le désir érotique
    Laval Théologique et Philosophique 61 (2): 345-353. 2005.
    Mettre en rapport des textes de Hegel sur l’amour érotique avec quelques passages du penseur romantique Friedrich Schlegel permet de mettre en relief la méfiance hégélienne à l’égard du désir sexuel. Selon l’échelle hiérarchique de désirs chez Hegel, le désir érotique fait preuve d’un déséquilibre entre le sujet désirant et l’objet désiré, ce qui est typique d’un rapport purement naturel et non spirituel. C’est dire que la connaissance charnelle, avec son objet dénué de Soi propre, représente po…Read more
  •  4
    Last Words
    In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel, University of Toronto Press. pp. 117-120. 2007.
  •  1
    Index
    In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel, University of Toronto Press. pp. 171-175. 2007.
  • Clio the Romantic Muse: Historicizing the Faculties in Germany (review)
    Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 34 (1-2): 199-205. 2005.
  •  1
    Bibliography
    In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel, University of Toronto Press. pp. 159-170. 2007.
  •  11
    Hegel and the Politics of Tragedy, Comedy and Terror
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1): 135-153. 2020.
    Greek tragedy, in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, represents the performative realization of binary political difference, for example, “private versus public,” “man versus woman” or “nation versus state.” On the other hand, Roman comedy and French Revolutionary Terror, in Hegel, can be taken as radical expressions of political in-difference, defined as a state where all mediating structures of association and governance have collapsed into a world of “bread and circuses.” In examining the diale…Read more
  •  5
    Hegel uses the term Einsicht throughout several key subsections of Chapter Six of the Phenomenology of Spirit. Nowhere else in his work does the term enjoy such a sustained treatment. Commentators generally accept Hegel’s use of the term in the Phenomenology as simply referring to the type of counter-religious reasoning found in the French Enlightenment. I show how Hegel derives the term, through the lens of Kant’s essay, ‘What Does It Mean to Orient Oneself in Thinking?’ from the Pantheismusstr…Read more
  •  20
    Ful-filling the Copula, Determining Nature: The Grammatical Ontology of Hegel's Metaphysics
    Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (4): 575-593. 2017.
    Until their recent Anglo-American rehabilitation or reinvention, metaphysics, perhaps since Kant, have tended to be either philosophically avoided or rejected wholesale. The word itself has been taken as virtually synonymous with ideology and unscientific religiosity. Systematic metaphysical coherence has even been portrayed as harboring incipient totalitarianism. Epistemologically and politically, metaphysics have been reproached for their pernicious disregard for something called "reality."In …Read more
  •  2
    Reason and Revelation
    Symposium 21 (1): 182-202. 2017.
    Contemporary reluctance to consider any complicity between philosophy and religion has led to an inability to consider, in Hegel studies, how the revelatory agency of the Absolute necessarily complements the narrative of human reason. According to Hegel, reason alone can do no more than end in the endless limitations of actuality, in the infinite approximations of a moral summum bonum and in the ad infinitum strivings for concrete political freedom. Recognizing where revelatory agency occurs in …Read more
  •  2
    Frontmatter
    In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel, University of Toronto Press. 2007.
  •  120
    Why does Hegel change “Dreaming Soul” to “Feeling Soul” in the 1830 edition of the Philosophy of Subjective Spirit? By tracing the content of the Dreaming Soul section, through Hegel’s 1794 manuscript on psychology, to sources such as C.P. Moritz’s Magazin zur Erfahrungsseelenkunde, the paper shows how the section embraces a late Enlightenment mission: combating supposedly supernatural expressions of spiritual enthrallment by explaining them as pathological conditions of the soul. Responding to …Read more
  •  74
    Reason and Revelation: Absolute Agency and the Limits of Actuality in Hegel
    Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 21 (1). 2017.
    Contemporary reluctance to consider any complicity between philosophy and religion has led to an inability to consider, in Hegel studies, how the revelatory agency of the Absolute necessarily complements the narrative of human reason. According to Hegel, reason alone can do no more than end in the endless limitations of actuality, in the infinite approximations of a moral summum bonum and in the ad infinitum strivings for concrete political freedom. Recognizing where revelatory agency occurs in …Read more
  • Great Philosophers: A Brief History
    Broadview Press. 2008.
    Great Philosophers tells the story of Western philosophy through the thought of its main protagonists, the great philosophers. The narrative begins with the Presocratic philosophers Heraclitus and Parmenides and ends in recent times, as each philosopher wrestles with the problems and solutions of his or her predecessors. Along the way, Jeffrey Reid provides an engaging introduction to many of the principal ideas of luminaries such as Plato, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche and Sartre. Gre…Read more
  • Galvanism and excitability in Friedrich Schlegel's Theory of the Fragment
    Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 38 (1): 1-16. 2008.
  •  2
    2. The Ontological Grasp of Judgment
    In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel, University of Toronto Press. pp. 18-28. 2007.
  • No Title available: Dialogue
    Dialogue 45 (3): 591-594. 2006.
  •  39
    Within Hegel’s system of science, judgement (Urteil) is thought’s original dividing from identity into difference. In the same context, judgement is also an act of predication where “subject” must be understood in both a grammatical and psychical sense. Thus, judgement expresses a language act that is a self-positing into the difference of being. This article looks at two examples where Hegel’s ontological notion of judgement obtains, then finds, the roots of this notion in Hölderlin and Fichte.…Read more
  •  1
    Acknowledgments
    In Real Words: Language and System in Hegel, University of Toronto Press. 2007.