•  11
    Philosophy of Criminal Law
    Noûs 26 (4): 527-532. 1992.
  • The quest for the Mount Kenya muriyu
    with G. Fergusson and R. Hudson
    Vivarium 3 18-22. 1991.
  •  1
    Before Forgiving: Cautionary Views of Forgiveness in Psychotherapy (edited book)
    with Sharon Lamb
    Oxford University Press USA. 2002.
    For psychologists and psychotherapists, the notion of forgiveness has been enjoying a substantial vogue. For their patients, it holds the promise of "moving on" and healing emotional wounds. The forgiveness of others - and of one's self - would seem to offer the kind of peace that psychotherapy alone has never been able to provide. In this volume, psychologist Sharon Lamb and philosopher Jeffrie Murphy argue that forgiveness has been accepted as a therapeutic strategy without serious, critical e…Read more
  •  17
  •  12
    Reply to Bennett
    Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1): 117-119. 2017.
  •  9
    Reply to Susan Bandes
    Criminal Justice Ethics 35 (3): 201-204. 2016.
  •  5
    Shame Creeps Through Guilt and Feels Like Retribution
    Law and Philosophy 18 (4): 327-344. 1999.
  • Kant's Moral Philosophy
    Philosophy 47 (180): 173-175. 1972.
  • Getting Even: Forgiveness and Its Limits
    Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221): 686-688. 2005.
  • Books in Review
    Political Theory 15 (4): 669-673. 1987.
  •  10
    A Natural Law of Human Labor
    American Journal of Jurisprudence 39 (1): 71-95. 1994.
  •  18
    Forgiveness and Mercy
    with Jean Hampton
    Cambridge University Press. 1990.
    This book focuses on the degree to which certain moral and legal doctrines are rooted in specific passions that are then institutionalised in the form of criminal law. A philosophical analysis is developed of the following questions: when, if ever, should hatred be overcome by sympathy or compassion? What are forgiveness and mercy and to what degree do they require - both conceptually and morally - the overcoming of certain passions and the motivation by other passions? If forgiveness and mercy …Read more
  •  1
    Repentance, Mercy, and Communicative Punishment
    In Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.), Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff, Oxford University Press. 2011.
  •  163
    In this revised edition, two distinguished philosophers have extended and strengthened the most authoritative text available on the philosophy of law and jurisprudence. While retaining their comprehensive coverage of classical and modern theory, Murphy and Coleman have added new discussions of the Critical Legal Studies movement and feminist jurisprudence, and they have strengthened their treatment of natural law theory, criminalization, and the law of torts. The chapter on law and economics rem…Read more
  •  116
    Legal moralism and retribution revisited
    Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (1): 5-20. 2007.
    This is a slightly revised text of Jeffrie G. Murphy’s Presidential Address delivered to the American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, in March 2006. In the essay the author reconsiders two positions he had previously defended—the liberal attack on legal moralism and robust versions of the retributive theory of punishment—and now finds these positions much more vulnerable to legitimate attack than he had previously realized. In the first part of the essay, he argues that the us…Read more
  •  64
    Kant’s Concept of a Right Action
    The Monist 51 (4): 574-598. 1967.
    Introduction. For the most part, Kant’s moral philosophy is no longer taught. What is taught instead is a parody of Kant’s moral philosophy. His views, generally used as a foil for some other view like utilitarianism, are summed up in a few popular cliches which have achieved the status of interpretive dogma. Small wonder that undergraduates go away thinking that Kant is, at worst, a moral fanatic or, at best, a well-intentioned bungler who allowed his right-wing political views and Pietist upbr…Read more
  •  69
    The unhappy immoralist
    Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1). 2004.
  •  42
    [Book review] forgiveness and mercy (review)
    with Jean Hampton
    Ethics 100 (2): 413-415. 1990.
    This book focuses on the degree to which certain moral and legal doctrines are rooted in specific passions that are then institutionalised in the form of criminal law. A philosophical analysis is developed of the following questions: when, if ever, should hatred be overcome by sympathy or compassion? What are forgiveness and mercy and to what degree do they require - both conceptually and morally - the overcoming of certain passions and the motivation by other passions? If forgiveness and mercy …Read more
  •  8
    Review: Injustice and Misfortune (review)
    Law and Philosophy 10 (4). 1991.
  •  28
    H. L. A. Hart, in his classic book Law, Liberty, and Morality, is unsuccessful in arguing that James Fitzjames Stephen’s observations about the role of vice in criminal sentencing have no relevance to a more general defense of legal moralism. He does, however, have a very important insight about the special significance of sexual liberty
  •  29
    Meaningfulness and the Doctrine of Eternal Return
    International Studies in Philosophy 18 (2): 61-66. 1986.