•  25
    Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory
    Philosophical Review 106 (4): 610. 1997.
    True to his longstanding bias against grand unifying theories, Hacking chooses to pursue these questions by focusing on a specific case of memory-thinking: the history of multiple personality. His excavation of the contemporary terrain leads him, however, to the surprisingly grand conclusion that the various sciences of memory—including neurological studies of localization, experimental studies of recall, and studies in the psychodynamics of memory—all emerged in connection with attempts to “sci…Read more
  •  31
    Hylomorphic virtue: cosmology, embryology, and moral development in Aristotle
    Philosophical Explorations 22 (2): 222-242. 2019.
    Aristotle is traditionally read as dividing animal souls into three parts, while dividing human souls into four parts (a rational part, with theoretical and pr...
  • A Reanalysis of Murdock's Model for Social Structure, Based on Optimal Scaling
    with D. R. White, M. L. Burton, A. K. Romney, and C. C. Moore
  •  11
    Annette Baier is my philosophical foremother. This paper examines Baier’s views on such topics as personal identity and philosophical methodology. It also examines the idea of motherhood, and the various forms that it takes.
  •  1
    Aristotle, Kant and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty
    Philosophical Quarterly 49 (195): 261-263. 1999.
  •  2
    Individual Forms in Aristotle
    Dissertation, Cornell University. 1984.
    Against the traditional view that Aristotle recognizes only one form--a universal--for each infima species, I argue that Aristotle recognizes a plurality of numerically distinct individual forms for each. Chapter One argues that the Metaphysics' criteria for being a substance show that individual forms are substances. Chapter Three argues that individual forms are the principles of individuation for cospecific individuals. ;My main argument is that Aristotle's defense of the distinction between …Read more
  •  2
    Aristotle on Form and Generation
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 35-63. 1990.
  •  15
    Comments on “Why Involuntary Actions are Painful” by Susan Sauvé
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (Supplement): 159-167. 1989.
  •  146
    Eudaimonia, external results, and choosing virtuous actions for themselves
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2): 270-290. 2002.
    Aristotle's requirement that virtuous actions be chosen for themselves is typically interpreted, in Kantian terms, as taking virtuous action to have intrinsic rather than consequentialist value. This raises problems about how to reconcile Aristotle's requirement with (a) the fact that virtuous actions typically aim at ends beyond themselves (usually benefits to others); and (b) Aristotle's apparent requirement that everything (including virtuous action) be chosen for the sake of eudaimonia. I of…Read more
  •  300
    Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty (edited book)
    Cambridge University Press. 1998.
    This major collection of essays offers the first serious challenge to the traditional view that ancient and modern ethics are fundamentally opposed. In doing so, it has important implications for contemporary ethical thought, as well as providing a significant re-assessment of the work of Aristotle, Kant and the Stoics. The contributors include internationally recognised interpreters of ancient and modern ethics. Four pairs of essays compare and contrast Aristotle and Kant on deliberation and mo…Read more
  •  3
    In her essay collection First, Second, and Other Selves: Essays on Friendship and Personal Identity, well-known scholar of ancient philosophy Jennifer Whiting gathers her previously published essays taking Aristotle's theories on friendship as a springboard to engage with contemporary philosophical work on personal identity and moral psychology. Whiting examines three themes throughout the collection, the first being psychic contingency, or the belief that the psychological structures characteri…Read more
  •  46
    Back to “The Self and the Future”
    Philosophical Topics 26 (1-2): 441-477. 1999.
  •  48
    Love: self-propagation, self-preservation, or ekstasis?
    Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (4): 403-429. 2013.
    My title refers to three accounts of interpersonal love: the rationalist account that Terence Irwin ascribes to Plato; the anti-rationalist but strikingly similar account that Harry Frankfurt endorses in his own voice; and the ‘ekstatic’ account that I – following the lead of Martha Nussbaum – find in Plato's Phaedrus. My claim is that the ekstatic account points to important features of interpersonal love to which the other accounts fail to do justice, especially reciprocity and a regulative id…Read more
  •  12
    Eudaimonia, External Results, and Choosing Virtuous Actions for Themselves
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2): 270-290. 2002.
    Aristotle’s requirement that virtuous actions be chosen for themselves is typically interpreted, in Kantian terms, as taking virtuous action to have intrinsic rather than consequentialist value. This raises problems about how to reconcile Aristotle’s requirement with the fact that virtuous actions typically aim at ends beyond themselves ; and Aristotle’s apparent requirement that everything be chosen for the sake of eudaimonia. I offer an alternative interpretation, based on Aristotle’s account …Read more
  • Persons and Passions: Essays in Honor of Annette Baier (edited book)
    with Joyce Jenkins and Christopher Williams
    University of Notre Dame Press. 2005.
  •  35
    Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory
    Philosophical Review 106 (4): 610-613. 1997.
    True to his longstanding bias against grand unifying theories, Hacking chooses to pursue these questions by focusing on a specific case of memory-thinking: the history of multiple personality. His excavation of the contemporary terrain leads him, however, to the surprisingly grand conclusion that the various sciences of memory—including neurological studies of localization, experimental studies of recall, and studies in the psychodynamics of memory—all emerged in connection with attempts to “sci…Read more
  •  191
    Human Nature and Intellectualism in Aristotle
    Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 68 (1): 70-95. 1986.
  •  5
    Colloquium 2
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1): 35-63. 1990.
  •  13
    Locomotive soul: the parts of soul in Aristotle's scientific works'
    Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 22 141-200. 2002.
  •  218
  •  70
    Strong Dialectic, Neurathian Reflection, and the Ascent of Desire: Irwin and Mcdowell on Aristotle’s Methods of Ethics
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1): 61-122. 2002.
  •  314
    Impersonal Friends
    The Monist 74 (1): 3-29. 1991.
    The rationality of concern for oneself has been taken for granted by the authors of western moral and political thought in a way in which the rationality of concern for others has not. While various authors have differed about the morality of self-concern, and about the extent to which such concern is rationally required, few have doubted that we have at least some special reasons to care for our selves, reasons that differ either in degree or in kind from those we have to care for others. The r…Read more
  •  6
    Commentary on Furth
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 2 (1): 268-273. 1986.