•  156
    A Defense of Compulsory Vaccination
    HEC Forum 26 (1): 5-25. 2014.
    Vaccine refusal harms and risks harming innocent bystanders. People are not entitled to harm innocents or to impose deadly risks on others, so in these cases there is nothing to be said for the right to refuse vaccination. Compulsory vaccination is therefore justified because non-vaccination can rightly be prohibited, just as other kinds of harmful and risky conduct are rightly prohibited. I develop an analogy to random gunfire to illustrate this point. Vaccine refusal, I argue, is morally simil…Read more
  •  120
    Three arguments against prescription requirements
    Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10): 579-586. 2012.
    In this essay, I argue that prescription drug laws violate patients' rights to self-medication. Patients have rights to self-medication for the same reasons they have rights to refuse medical treatment according to the doctrine of informed consent (DIC). Since we should accept the DIC, we ought to reject paternalistic prohibitions of prescription drugs and respect the right of self-medication. In section 1, I frame the puzzle of self-medication; why don't the same considerations that tell in fav…Read more
  •  75
    Adderall for All: A Defense of Pediatric Neuroenhancement
    HEC Forum 25 (4): 325-344. 2013.
    I argue that young patients should be able to access neuroenhancing drugs without a diagnosis of ADHD. The current framework of consent for pediatric patients can be adapted to accommodate neuroenhancement. After a brief overview of pediatric neuroenhancement, I develop three arguments in favor of greater acceptance of neuroenhancement for young patients. First, ADHD is not relevantly different from other disadvantages that could be treated with stimulant medication. Second, establishing a legit…Read more
  •  68
    Seat Belt Mandates and Paternalism
    Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (3): 291-314. 2017.
    _ Source: _Page Count 24 Seat belt mandates seem like a paradigmatic case of justified paternalism. Even those who generally object to paternalism often concede that seat belt laws are justified. Against this near-consensus in favor of mandates, I argue that seat belt laws are unjust and public officials should not enforce them. The most plausible exceptions to a principle of anti-paternalism do not justify seat belt mandates. Some argue that seat belt mandates are not paternalistic because unbe…Read more
  •  53
  •  49
    Rethinking freedom of contract
    Philosophical Studies 174 (2): 443-463. 2017.
    Many liberal egalitarians support laws that prevent people from making exploitative and unconscionable contracts. These contracts may include low-wage labor agreements or payday loans, for example. I argue that liberal egalitarians should rethink their support for laws that limit the freedom to make these illiberal contracts, as long as the contracts are voluntary and do not violate people’s other enforceable rights. Paternalistic considerations cannot justify limits on illiberal contracts becau…Read more
  •  47
    Public Bioethics
    Public Health Ethics 6 (2): 170-184. 2013.
    In this essay I argue that the same considerations that justify the strong commitment to anti-paternalism that has been affirmed in bioethics over the past half century, also calls for anti-paternalistic public health policies. First, I frame the puzzle—why are citizens morally entitled to make unhealthy and medically inadvisable decisions as patients but not as consumers? I then briefly sketch the reasons why bioethicists typically reject paternalism. Next, I argue that those same reasons tell …Read more
  •  42
    Sweatshop Regulation and Workers’ Choices
    Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1): 79-94. 2018.
    The choice argument against sweatshop regulations states that public officials should not prohibit workers from accepting jobs that require long hours, low pay, and poor working conditions, because enforcing such regulations would be disrespectful to the workers who choose to work in sweatshops. Critics of the choice argument reply that these regulations can be justified when workers only choose to work in sweatshops because they lack acceptable alternatives and are unable to coordinate to achie…Read more
  •  37
    All Liberty is Basic
    Res Publica 24 (4): 455-474. 2018.
    Recent arguments for the basic status of economic liberty can be deployed to show that all liberty is basic. The argument for the basic status of all liberty is as follows. First, John Tomasi’s defense of basic economic liberties is successful. Economic freedom can be further defended against powerful high liberal objections, which libertarians including Tomasi have so far overlooked. Yet arguments for basic economic freedom raise a puzzle about the distinction between basic and non-basic libert…Read more
  •  34
    Duty and Enforcement
    Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (3): 341-362. 2019.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
  •  32
    Inequality and Markets in Bodily Services
    Political Theory 41 (1): 144-150. 2013.
    I argue that asymmetries in taste and talent can explain markets in bodily services, just as they explain other kinds of work. While inequality is a powerful explanation for participation in bodily-service markets, such markets are not unique in their reliance on inequality. Finally, I address another kind of inequality that deserves our attention -- the advantage of the providers of bodily services over those who require them. While those who suffer from infertility or face the terror of organ …Read more
  •  30
    Obstetric Autonomy and Informed Consent
    Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1): 225-244. 2016.
    I argue that public officials and health workers ought to respect and protect women’s rights to make risky choices during childbirth. Women’s rights to make treatment decisions ought to be respected even if their decisions expose their unborn children to unnecessary risks, and even if it is wrong to put unborn children at risk. I first defend a presumption of medical autonomy in the context of childbirth. I then draw on women’s birth stories to show that women’s medical autonomy is often ignored…Read more
  •  28
    Seat Belt Mandates and Paternalism
    New Content is Available for Journal of Moral Philosophy. forthcoming.
    _ Source: _Page Count 24 Seat belt mandates seem like a paradigmatic case of justified paternalism. Even those who generally object to paternalism often concede that seat belt laws are justified. Against this near-consensus in favor of mandates, I argue that seat belt laws are unjust and public officials should not enforce them. The most plausible exceptions to a principle of anti-paternalism do not justify seat belt mandates. Some argue that seat belt mandates are not paternalistic because unbe…Read more
  •  17
    Prescription requirements: a reply to Taylor, Martin and Eyal
    Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10): 591-592. 2012.
  •  14
    Non-culpable ignorance and HIV criminalisation
    Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (12): 798-801. 2014.
  •  12
    Refusal rights, law and medical paternalism in Turkey
    Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10): 636-637. 2013.
    Dr Tolga Guven and Dr Gurkan Sert argue the Turkish legal principles do not give clear guidance about the permissibility of medical paternalism. They then argue that the best interpretation of these principles requires respect for patients’ rights. I agree that medical paternalism is wrong, but the truth of this claim does not depend on legal interpretation or medical culture. Further, the antipaternalist thesis of Guven and Sert may command much more extensive reforms than they acknowledge
  •  11
    Charisma and Moral Reasoning
    Religions 4 (2): 216-229. 2013.
  •  3
    Double standards and arguments for tobacco regulation
    Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (5): 305-311. 2016.
  •  2
    Economic Freedom and the ACA
    Public Affairs Quarterly 27 (3). 2013.
  •  1
    Jessica Flanigan defends patients' rights of self-medication on the grounds that same moral reasons against medical paternalism in clinical contexts are also reasons against paternalistic pharmaceutical policies, including prohibitive approval processes and prescription requirements.
  •  1
    Debating Sex Work
    Oup Usa. 2019.
    In this "for and against" book, ethicists Lori Watson and Jessica Flanigan debate the criminalization of sex work. Watson argues for a sex equality approach to prostitution in which buyers are criminalized and sellers are decriminalized, known as the Nordic Model. Flanigan argues that sex work should be fully decriminalized because decriminalization ensures respect for sex workers' and clients' rights, and is more effective than alternative policies.
  •  1
    Drug War Reparations
    Res Philosophica 97 (2): 141-168. 2020.
    Public officials should compensate the victims of wrongful conviction and enforcement. The same considerations in favor of compensating people for wrongful conviction and enforcement in other cases support officials’ payment of reparations to the victims of unjust enforcement practices related to the drug war. First, we defend the claim that people who are convicted and incarcerated because of an unjust law are wrongfully convicted. Although their convictions do not currently qualify as wrongful…Read more
  • Patient-driven drug development is an emerging approach to pharmaceutical research that is forged in rare-disease communities and patient advocacy networks. Patients and their advocates increasingly engage in drug discovery and influence early-stage drug research as clinical trial participants or through compassionate-use programs. Some advocacy groups and patients also influence which therapies are developed by financing promising treatments that otherwise would not secure funding. Though some …Read more