•  47
    The Normative Relevance of Cases
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (4): 481-492. 2012.
    Cases—be they real or fictional—are commonplace both in the medical ethics literature and in the public media. Cases take on a variety of forms: from streamlined to book length narratives. They also serve a variety of different purposes, from illustration, to decision making, and from debunking to heuristics. Drawing on the rhetorical analysis of « exemplum », I shall describe what cases are, and what their role is in the practice of clinical ethics. I identify two basic ways in which cases can…Read more
  •  39
    introduction Dialectic and the notion of tradition The past does not pull back but presses forward. (Hannah Arendt 1977: 10) Through the confrontation over ...
  •  29
    The French Euthanasia Debate
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (3): 254-262. 2013.
  •  23
    The near-failure of advance directives: why they should not be abandoned altogether, but their role radically reconsidered
    with Véronique Fournier
    Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (4): 563-568. 2016.
    Advance directives have been hailed for two decades as the best way to safeguard patients’ autonomy when they are totally or partially incompetent. In many national contexts they are written into law and they are mostly associated with end-of-life decisions. Although advocates and critics of ADs exchange relevant empirical and theoretical arguments, the debate is inconclusive. We argue that this is so for good reasons: the ADs’ project is fraught with tensions, and this is the reason why they ar…Read more
  •  21
    Clinical ethics and values: how do norms evolve from practice?
    Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1): 93-103. 2013.
    Bioethics laws in France have just undergone a revision process. The bioethics debate is often cast in terms of ethical principles and norms resisting emerging social and technological practices. This leads to the expression of confrontational attitudes based on widely differing interpretations of the same principles and values, and ultimately results in a deadlock. In this paper I would like to argue that focusing on values, as opposed to norms and principles, provides an interesting perspectiv…Read more
  •  10
    Personal Identity as a Form of Freedom
    with Laurence Brunet
    Hastings Center Report 44 (5): 3-4. 2014.
  •  9
    The French bioethics debate: norms, values and practices (review)
    with Véronique Fournier
    Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1): 41-44. 2013.
    In 1994, France passed bioethics laws regulating assisted reproductive technologies, organ donations and prenatal diagnosis. These laws were based upon a few principles considered as fundamental: the anonymity and gratuity of all donations concerning the elements of the human body, free and informed consent, and the interdiction of all commercial transactions on the human body. These laws have been the object of heated debates which continue to this day. On the basis on a few clinical ethics stu…Read more
  •  7
    Withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration in neonatal intensive care: parents’ and healthcare practitioners’ views
    with Véronique Fournier, Elisabeth Belghiti, and Laurence Brunet
    Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3): 365-371. 2017.
    Withdrawing Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in the neonatal intensive care units has long been controversial. In France, the practice has become a legal option since 2005. But even though, the question remains as to what the stakeholders’ experience is, and whether they consider it ethically appropriate. In order to contribute to the debate, we initiated a study in 2009 to evaluate parental and health care professionals perspectives, after they experienced WAHN for a newborn. The study includ…Read more
  •  7
    The Normative Relevance of Cases - Rhetoric and Empirical Ethics
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (4): 481-492. 2012.
    Cases—be they real or fictional—are commonplace both in the medical ethics literature and in the public media. Cases take on a variety of forms: from streamlined to book length narratives. They also serve a variety of different purposes, from illustration, to decision making, and from debunking to heuristics. Drawing on the rhetorical analysis of « exemplum », I shall describe what cases are, and what their role is in the practice of clinical ethics. I identify two basic ways in which cases can …Read more
  •  5
    When Patients' Values Challenge Professional Integrity: Which Way Out?
    Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (3): 326-336. 2016.
    An elderly patient in his early eighties is hospitalized in a long-term facility, with advanced Alzheimer disease. He is otherwise relatively strong and free from other life-threatening conditions, except for the fact that he has difficulties swallowing. After several episodes of acute aspiration pneumonia doctors prescribe “strict fast”: only hydration through an IV catheter should be administered during the night, in order to relieve the feeling of hunger, provide comfort, and stave off death.…Read more
  •  2
    The French Euthanasia Debate - Exception and Solidarity
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (3): 254-262. 2013.