•  47
    Martha Nussbaum Interview
    with James Garvey
    The Philosophers' Magazine 52 21-30. 2011.
    “Philosophy is constitutive of good citizenship. It becomes part of what you are when you are a good citizen – a thoughtful person. Philosophy has manyroles. It can be just fun, a game that you play. It can be a way you try to approach your own death or illness, or that of a family member. I’m just focusing on the place where I think I can win over people, and say ‘Look here, you do care about democracy don’t you? Then you’d better see that philosophy has a place.’”
  •  50
    Goodness and Advice
    with Judith Jarvis Thomson, Philip Fisher, J. B. Schneewind, and Barbara Herrnstein Smith
    Princeton University Press. 2003.
    In my contribution to this volume, I (BHS) comment on on the stultifying rhetoric of contemporary analytic moral theory as illustrated in Judith Jarvis Thomson's Tanner Lectures, with particular reference to Thomson's anxieties about the moral relativism exhibited by college freshman and to her efforts--quite strained, in my view, and inevitably unsuccessful--to demonstrate the existence of objective judgments in matters of morality and taste .
  •  4
    De Motu Animalium
    with H. B. Gottschalk and Aristotle
    American Journal of Philology 102 (1): 84. 1981.
  •  10
    Commentary on Halperin's' Plato and the Metaphysics of Desire'
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 5 (1): 53. 1989.
  •  4
    Nietzsche, Schopenhauer und Dionysos
    In Lore Hühn & Philipp Schwab (eds.), Die Philosophie des Tragischen: Schopenhauer - Schelling - Nietzsche, De Gruyter. pp. 319-356. 2011.
  •  3
    Philosophical norms and political attachments: Cicero and Seneca
    In Dorothea Frede & Burkhard Reis (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy, De Gruyter. pp. 425-446. 2009.
  •  17
    Substance, Body, and Soul: Aristotelian Investigations
    Journal of Philosophy 77 (6): 355-365. 1980.
  •  32
    The cosmopolitan tradition begins with Diogenes, who claimed as his identity "citizen of the world." Martha Nussbaum traces the cosmopolitan ideal from ancient times to the present, weighing its limitations as well as merits. Using the capabilities approach, Nussbaum seeks to integrate the "noble but flawed" vision of world citizenship with cosmopolitanism's concern with moral and political justice for all.--
  •  1
    Patriotisme et cosmopolitisme
    Cahiers Philosophiques 1 99. 2012.
  •  2
    Fatal Fictions: Crime and Investigation in Law and Literature (edited book)
    with Alison L. LaCroix and Richard H. McAdams
    Oxford University Press. 2016.
    Writers of fiction have always confronted topics of crime and punishment. This age-old fascination with crime on the part of both authors and readers is not surprising, given that criminal justice touches on so many political and psychological themes essential to literature, and comes equippedwith a trial process that contains its own dramatic structure. This volume explores this profound and enduring literary engagement with crime, investigation, and criminal justice. The collected essays explo…Read more
  •  2
    Sex & Social Justice
    Oxford University Press. 1999.
  • Power, Prose, and Purse: Law, Literature, and Economic Transformations (edited book)
    with Alison L. LaCroix and Saul Levmore
    Oup Usa. 2019.
    Power, Prose, and Purse is an edited collection of essays that draw connections between literature, economics and law. The essays discuss novels that explore the time period between the Industrial Revolution and the Great Depression and analyze the insights that novelists may offer to law and economics, while noting the tensions among these paradigms.
  •  17
    Untersuchungen zu Gorgias' Schrift
    Journal of Hellenic Studies 96 180. 1976.
  •  3
    Replies
    The Journal of Ethics 10 (4): 463-506. 2006.
    John Fischer challenges me to defend my arguments regarding the badness of death; I sharpen my position, but make some concessions, discussing the possibility of postmortem harm. In response to John Deigh, I defend the account of disgust given in Hiding from Humanity, together with the research of Paul Rozin that I follow there. I discuss Patrick Devlin’s conservative position, agree that we need to object to its emphasis on solidarity, not only to its emphasis on disgust, and argue that Deigh’s…Read more
  •  96
    Replies
    The Journal of Ethics 10 (4): 463-506. 2006.
    John Fischer challenges me to defend my arguments regarding the badness of death; I sharpen my position, but make some concessions, discussing the possibility of postmortem harm. In response to John Deigh, I defend the account of disgust given in Hiding from Humanity, together with the research of Paul Rozin that I follow there, I discuss Patrick Devlin's conservative position, agree that we need to object to its emphasis on solidarity, not only to its emphasis on disgust, and argue that Deigh's…Read more
  •  7
    Feminist Political Philosophy
    with Diemut Bubeck and Alex Klaushofer
    Women’s Philosophy Review 20 6-24. 1998.
  •  4
    From one of the world's most celebrated moral philosophers comes a thorough examination of the current American political crisis and recommendations for how to mend a divided country.
  •  34
  •  953
    Objectification
    Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (4): 249-291. 1995.
  •  1
    Therapy of DesireThe Therapy of Desire
    with Richard Sorabji
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3): 799. 1999.
  •  60
    Reply to Papers in Symposium on Nussbaum, The Therapy of DesireThe Therapy of Desire (review)
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3): 811. 1999.
  •  4
    Bibliography
    In The Therapy of Desire: Theory and Practice in Hellenistic Ethics, Princeton University Press. pp. 517-530. 2009.
  •  2
    Fear of FeelingUpheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of Emotions
    with Barry Hoffmaster
    Hastings Center Report 33 (1): 45. 2003.