•  42
    The Nature of Evil
    Modern Schoolman 71 (1): 59-69. 1993.
  •  74
    This fascinating and expertly edited little volume brings to light some hitherto neglected works, illustrating Leibniz’s lifelong interest in the calculus of combinations, and in the problem of the progress of human culture. In fact both interests are united in these works in a characteristically Leibnizian way. Leibniz’s project in De l’Horizon de la Doctrine Humaine is well expressed in its lengthy subtitle: “Meditation on the number of all possible truths and falsities, enunciable by humanity…Read more
  • Leibniz's Doctrine of Evil
    Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada). 1993.
    In this study I offer a critique of the interpretation of G. W. Leibniz's doctrine of evil current in English-language Leibniz scholarship, an interpretation which has its origin in Bertrand Russell's pioneering book A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz. I offer fresh expositions of Leibniz's doctrines concerning the nature and sources of evil, and of the types of evil , paying particular attention to the fact that Leibniz's theodicy is steeped in the Western Christian tradition of…Read more
  •  791
    Leibniz’s Conception of Metaphysical Evil
    The Leibniz Review 3 (1): 17-18. 1993.
    A central doctrine of Leibniz’s Theodicy is the classification of evils as metaphysical, physical and moral. Moral evil is sin; physical evil is suffering; and metaphysical evil, Leibniz says, is “simple imperfection”. It has been common-place in Leibniz scholarship to understand metaphysical evil as identical with the Leibnizian notion of the “original imperfection of the creature,” or the limitation which inevitably characterizes any created substance. This is Russell’s interpretation; and its…Read more
  •  6
    Leibniz’s Conception of Metaphysical Evil
    The Leibniz Review 3 17-18. 1993.
    A central doctrine of Leibniz’s Theodicy is the classification of evils as metaphysical, physical and moral. Moral evil is sin; physical evil is suffering; and metaphysical evil, Leibniz says, is “simple imperfection”. It has been common-place in Leibniz scholarship to understand metaphysical evil as identical with the Leibnizian notion of the “original imperfection of the creature,” or the limitation which inevitably characterizes any created substance. This is Russell’s interpretation; and its…Read more
  •  3
    Topical Outline of the THEODICY
    The Leibniz Review 7 128-143. 1997.
    Since 1951, English-language readers of Leibniz’s Theodicy have been well-served by the elegant and readable translation of E. M. Huggard, published by Routledge & Kegan Paul and Open Court, and edited by Austin Farrer. However, this edition has some conspicuous failings: it leaves Latin, Greek, and German phrases untranslated; provides a name index only, thus omitting Leibniz’s own useful topical index; and completely omits the interesting and substantial synopsis, Causa Dei Asserta. The French…Read more
  •  18
    3. Descartes's Theodicy of Error
    In Michael J. Latzer & Elmar J. Kremer (eds.), The Problem of Evil in Early Modern Philosophy, University of Toronto Press. pp. 35-48. 2001.
  •  1
    The Marcel-Teilhard Debate
    New Blackfriars 82 (961): 132-137. 2001.
  •  6
    Topical Outline of the THEODICY
    The Leibniz Review 7 128-143. 1997.
    Since 1951, English-language readers of Leibniz’s Theodicy have been well-served by the elegant and readable translation of E. M. Huggard, published by Routledge & Kegan Paul and Open Court, and edited by Austin Farrer. However, this edition has some conspicuous failings: it leaves Latin, Greek, and German phrases untranslated; provides a name index only, thus omitting Leibniz’s own useful topical index; and completely omits the interesting and substantial synopsis, Causa Dei Asserta. The French…Read more
  •  37
    Topical Outline of the THEODICY
    The Leibniz Review 7 128-143. 1997.
    Since 1951, English-language readers of Leibniz’s Theodicy have been well-served by the elegant and readable translation of E. M. Huggard, published by Routledge & Kegan Paul and Open Court, and edited by Austin Farrer. However, this edition has some conspicuous failings: it leaves Latin, Greek, and German phrases untranslated; provides a name index only, thus omitting Leibniz’s own useful topical index; and completely omits the interesting and substantial synopsis, Causa Dei Asserta. The French…Read more
  • NADLER, S.-The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche
    Philosophical Books 43 (3): 228-228. 2002.