•  38
    Mapping collective behavior in the big-data era
    with R. Alexander Bentley and William A. Brock
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1): 63-76. 2014.
    The behavioral sciences have flourished by studying how traditional and/or rational behavior has been governed throughout most of human history by relatively well-informed individual and social learning. In the online age, however, social phenomena can occur with unprecedented scale and unpredictability, and individuals have access to social connections never before possible. Similarly, behavioral scientists now have access to “big data” sets – those from Twitter and Facebook, for example – that…Read more
  •  11
    More on maps, terrains, and behaviors
    with R. Alexander Bentley and William A. Brock
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1): 105-119. 2014.
    The behavioral sciences have flourished by studying how traditional and/or rational behavior has been governed throughout most of human history by relatively well-informed individual and social learning. In the online age, however, social phenomena can occur with unprecedented scale and unpredictability, and individuals have access to social connections never before possible. Similarly, behavioral scientists now have access to “big data” sets – those from Twitter and Facebook, for example – that…Read more
  •  8
    Mapping multiple drivers of human obesity
    with R. Alexander Bentley
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40. 2017.
  •  6
    Where have you gone, Joseph scaliger?
    Modern Intellectual History 13 (1): 261-271. 2016.
  •  3
    A long view of cumulative technological culture
    with R. Alexander Bentley
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43. 2020.
    We agree that the emergence of cumulative technological culture was tied to nonsocial cognitive skills, namely, technical-reasoning skills, which allowed humans to constantly acquire and improve information. Our concern is with a reading of the history of cumulative technological culture that is based largely on modern experiments in simulated settings and less on phenomena crucial to the long-term dynamics of cultural evolution.
  •  1
    Doing Murga, Undoing Gender: Feminist Carnival in Argentina
    with Julia Mcreynolds-Pérez
    Gender and Society 34 (3): 413-436. 2020.
    Murga porteña, the satirical street theatre tradition associated with Carnival in Buenos Aires, Argentina, is historically a strongly patriarchal institution. Prominent roles such as reciting poetry, singing, and playing percussion instruments have been reserved exclusively for men. As the feminist movement in Argentina has grown in visibility and importance in recent years, feminist murga participants disrupted these patriarchal patterns. Women murga performers have begun to use murga as a spac…Read more
  • The Worlds of American Intellectual History (edited book)
    with Joel Isaac, James T. Kloppenberg, and Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen
    Oxford University Press USA. 2017.
    The essays in this book demonstrate the breadth and vitality of American intellectual history. Their core theme is the diversity of both American intellectual life and of the frameworks that we must use to make sense of that diversity. The Worlds of American Intellectual History has at its heart studies of American thinkers. Yet it follows these thinkers and their ideas as they have crossed national, institutional, and intellectual boundaries. The volume explores ways in which American ideas hav…Read more