•  635
    The Positive Function of Evil?
    Philosophical Papers 41 (1): 149-165. 2012.
    Philosophical Papers, Volume 41, Issue 1, Page 149-165, March 2012
  •  104
    Bayesian Analyses of Hume’s Argument Concerning Miracles
    Philosophy and Theology 10 (1): 101-106. 1997.
    Bayesian analyses are prominent among recent and allegedly novel interpretations of Hume’s argument against the justified belief in miracles. However, since there is no consensus on just what Hume’s argument is any Bayesian analysis will beg crucial issues of interpretation. Apart from independent philosophical arguments—arguments that would undermine the relevance of a Bayesian analysis to the question of the credibility of reports of the miraculous—no such analysis can, in principle, prove tha…Read more
  •  87
    Pantheism, theism and the problem of evil
    International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35 (3). 1994.
  •  85
    Hope: The Janus-faced virtue
    with Michael Schrader
    European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (3): 11-30. 2019.
    In this essay we argue for the Janus-faced nature of hope. We show that attempts to sanitise the concept of hope either by separating it conceptually from other phenomena such as wishful thinking, or, more generally, by seeking to minimise the negative aspects of hope, do not help us to understand the nature of hope and its functions as regards religion. Drawing on functional accounts of religion from Clifford Geertz and Tamas Pataki, who both—in their different ways—see the function of religion…Read more
  •  76
    Belief in miracles: Tillotson's argument against transubstantiation as a model for Hume (review)
    International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (3). 1988.
    HUME THOUGHT THAT WE CANNOT BE JUSTIFIED IN BELIEVING AN EVENT E TO HAVE OCCURRED GIVEN E’S CHARACTERIZATION OF A VIOLATION OF A LAW OF NATURE. HE CLAIMS THAT HE IS USING AN ARGUMENT SIMILAR TO JOHN TILLOTSON’S AGAINST TRANSUBSTANTIATION. A COMPARISON OF HUME’S ARGUMENT WITH TILLOTSON’S CAN HELP IN ANSWERING THE QUESTION OF WHETHER ONE CAN BE JUSTIFIED IN BELIEVING IN A MIRACLE. THE EVIDENTIAL VALUE OF BOTH TESTIMONY FOR, AND FIRSTHAND EXPERIENCE OF, AN ALLEGED MIRACLE IS CONSIDERED. I EXAMINE T…Read more
  •  74
    An introduction to philosophy through film, _Thinking Through Film: Doing Philosophy, Watching Movies_ combines the exploration of fundamental philosophical issues with the experience of viewing films, and provides an engaging reading experience for undergraduate students, philosophy enthusiasts and film buffs alike. An in-depth yet accessible introduction to the philosophical issues raised by films, film spectatorship and film-making Provides 12 self-contained, close discussions of individual f…Read more
  •  73
    The Problem of Evil
    The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999 127-146. 1999.
    The shift from the logical to the empirical argument from evil against the existence of God has been seen as a victory by analytic philosophers of religion who now seek to establish that the existence of evil fails to make the existence of God improbable. I examine several arguments in an effort to establish the following: (i) Their victory is pyrrhic. They distort the historical, philosophical and religious nature of the problem of evil. (ii) In attempting to refute the empirical argument they …Read more
  •  72
    Alvin I. Goldman's epistemology and cognition: An introduction
    Philosophia 19 (2-3): 209-225. 1989.
    ‘Epistemics: an enterprise linking traditional epistemology, first with cognitive science and, second, with social scientific and humanistic disciplines that explore the interpersonal and cultural processes impinging on knowledge and belief’ (Epistemology and Cognition, p. vii).
  •  70
    Should we strive for integrity?
    with Damian Cox and Marguerite LaCaze
    Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (4): 519-530. 1999.
  •  69
    Hume's Abject Failure: The Argument against Miracles (review)
    Hume Studies 28 (1): 161-167. 2002.
    This book is divided into two parts. The first is Earman's harsh critique of Hume's essay and its conclusions. The second part of the book contains selections from primary texts of Locke, Spinoza, Clarke, and others, along with the text "Of Miracles," recording changes that Hume made. There is little in the way of explanation, a single paragraph in the preface, as to why these texts have been selected. Presumably, Earman sees each of these as containing something significant to contribute to the…Read more
  •  66
    What Does Ethics Have to do with Leadership?
    Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2): 1-18. 2014.
    Accounts of leadership in relation to ethics can and do go wrong in several ways that may lead us too quickly into thinking there is a tighter relationship between ethics and leadership than we have reason to believe. Firstly, these accounts can be misled by the centrality of values talk in recent discussions of leadership into thinking that values of a particular kind are sufficient for leadership. Secondly, the focus on character in recent leadership accounts can lead to a similar error. The a…Read more
  •  65
    Berkeley: How to make a mistake
    Philosophia 22 (1-2): 29-39. 1993.
  •  64
    This book examines the centrality of integrity in relation to a variety of philosophical and psychological concerns that impinge upon the ethical life.
  •  60
    Monism and pantheism
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (4): 95-110. 1992.
  •  59
    Pantheism, substance and unity
    International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 32 (1). 1992.
  •  57
    Can the concept of enlightenment evolve?
    Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3). 2003.
    Those who claim the concept of enlightenment (nibānna) has not evolved must rest their claim on a strong distinction between changing and variant interpretations of the concept on the one hand, and what the term really means or refers to on the other. This paper examines whether all evolution of the concept of enlightenment is best seen as interpretive variation rather than as embodying real notional change - a change in the reference of the term. It is implausible to suppose that the enlightenm…Read more
  •  52
    Philosophers often distinguish in some way between two senses of life's meaning. Paul Edwards terms these a ‘cosmic’ and ‘terrestrial’ sense. The cosmic sense is that of an overall purpose of which our lives are a part and in terms of which our lives must be understood and our purposes and interests arranged. This overall purpose is often identified with God's divine scheme, but the two need not necessarily be equated. The terrestrial sense of meaning is the meaning people find in their own live…Read more
  •  51
    War, politics and race: Reflections on violence in the 'war on terror'
    with Saul Newman
    Theoria 53 (110): 23-49. 2006.
    The authors argue that the 'war on terror' marks the ultimate convergence of war with politics, and the virtual collapse of any meaningful distinction between them. Not only does it signify the breakdown of international relations norms but also the militarization of internal life and political discourse. They explore the 'genealogy' of this situation firstly through the notion of the 'state of exception'—in which sovereign violence becomes indistinct from the law that is supposed to curtail it—…Read more
  •  50
    “I am not living next door to no zombie”: Posthumans and Prejudice
    with Damian Cox
    Critical Philosophy of Race 4 (1): 74. 2016.
    Posthumanist film and television is both a vehicle for reflection on discrimination and prejudice and a means of gratifying in fantasy deeply imbedded human impulses towards prejudice. Discrimination lies at the heart of posthuman narratives whenever the posthuman coalesces around an identifiable group in conflict with humans. We first introduce the idea of prejudice as a form of psychological defense, contrasting it with other accounts of prejudice in the philosophical literature. We then apply…Read more
  •  50
    Mediated memories
    Angelaki 11 (2). 2006.
    This Article does not have an abstract
  •  49
    Rational Emotion, Emotional Holism, True Love, and Charlie Chaplin
    Journal of Philosophical Research 24 487-504. 1999.
    This paper begins with an examination of Amelie Rorty’s claim that although “emotions cannot be rational in the narrow sense of being logically derived from accepted premises, they can be deemed rational . . . as ‘appropriately formed to serve our thriving.’” This is the background against which (i) I develop a notion of ‘emotional holism’ based on the aetiology of emotion in infantile phantasy; and (ii) introduce a dark corollary about the likelihood that our emotions do not, on the whole, matc…Read more
  •  48
    In “Narrative Explanations: The Case of History,” Paul A. Roth attempts to defend the legitimacy of narrative explanation in history against two central objections—the “methodological” and the “metaphysical.” Like Roth, I find the category of narrative explanation acceptable even if it is problematic, and even if the notions of “narrative,” “explanation,” and “narrative explanation” are not altogether clear. The philosophically grounded “methodological” objections to narrative explanation are of…Read more
  •  48
    Racism in Mind: Philosophical Explanations of Racism and Its Implications (edited book)
    with Tamas Pataki
    Cornell UP. 2004.
    Michael P. Levine, Tamas Pataki. the case of racism. If one understands racism to be rooted in some underlying psychological structure, then while what is ordinarily called racist behavior may well be indicative of such an underlying structure, ...
  •  44
    Violinists Run Amuck in South Dakota: Screen Doors Down in the Badlands!
    with Damian Cox
    Philosophical Papers 35 (2): 267-281. 2006.
    Re-Reading: Judith Jarvis Thompson, 'A Defense of Abortion'
  •  43
    More on “does traditional theism entail pantheism?”
    International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (1). 1986.
  •  41
    Pantheism
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2008.