•  1
    Hippocrates at phaedrus 270c
    Pacific Philosophical Quarterly. forthcoming.
  • Psychoanalysis and the Philosophy of Film
    In Noël Carroll, Laura T. Di Summa & Shawn Loht (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of the Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures, Springer. pp. 923-945. 2019.
    Psychoanalytic treatments of film encounter difficulties resembling those that Plato faced when he criticized tragedy: uncertainty over which persons are the objects of theoretical scrutiny; the call for the theorist’s anhedonia; and confusion between unperceived cognitive processes and those that are unconscious because disavowed. The uncertainty over objects lets us sort psychoanalyses of film according to whether they assess a film’s maker, its characters, the work, or its audience. Each appr…Read more
  •  4
    Tragedy’s Picture of Mourning
    Politeia 1 (1): 2-16. 2019.
  •  10
    Telling Good Love from Bad in Plato’s Phaedrus
    Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 32 (1): 41-58. 2017.
  •  1
    Plato, often cited as a founding father of Western philosophy, set out ideas in the _Republic_ regarding the nature of justice, order, and the character of the just individual, that endure into the modern day. _The_ _Routledge Guidebook to Plato’s Republic_ introduces the major themes in Plato’s great book and acts as a companion for reading the work, examining: The context of Plato’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in relation to its goals, meanings and imp…Read more
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    Plato, often cited as a founding father of Western philosophy, set out ideas in the Republic regarding the nature of justice, order, and the character of the just individual, that endure into the modern day. The Routledge Guidebook to Plato’s Republic introduces the major themes in Plato’s great book and acts as a companion for reading the work, examining: The context of Plato’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in relation to its goals, meanings and impact Th…Read more
  •  17
    Two Myths of Philosophy’s Beginnings
    Philosophical Inquiry 40 (3-4): 6-22. 2016.
  • Understanding Plato’s Republic (review)
    Ancient Philosophy 32 (1): 185-190. 2012.
  • The Nietzsche Disappointment confronts Nietzsche's recurrent, symptomatic struggles with causal accounts. His explanations of past and future raise high hopes; when they fail they are responsible for profound disappointment
  • _Menexenus_ is one of the least studied among Plato's works, mostly because of the puzzling nature of the text, which has led many scholars either to reject the dialogue as spurious or to consider it as a mocking parody of Athenian funeral rhetoric. In this book, Pappas and Zelcer provide a persuasive alternative reading of the text, one that contributes in many ways to our understanding of Plato, and specifically to our understanding of his political thought. The book is organized into two part…Read more
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    In this second edition of the highly successfulRoutledge Philosophy GuideBook to Plato and theRepublic, Nickolas Pappas extends his exploration of the text to ...
  •  1
    The Poetics’ Argument Against Plato
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (1): 83-100. 1992.
  •  1
    Plato's _Republic _is perhaps the most significant and important work of philosophy and is Plato's most famous work. No other work has made such an impact on the history of western thought. In this second edition of the highly successful Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Plato and the _Republic_, Nickolas Pappas extends his exploration of the text to include substantial revisions and new material. In addition to the existing text, the chapters on Plato's ethics and politics have been revised and…Read more
  • Replies to Mass and Golumbia
    In Emanuela Bianchi (ed.), Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy?, Northwestern University Press. pp. 212. 1999.
  •  57
    Plato's Ion: The Problem of the Author: Nickolas Pappas
    Philosophy 64 (249): 381-389. 1989.
    Today Plato's Ion, thought one of his weaker works, gets little attention. But in the past it has had its admirers–in 1821, for example, Percy Bysshe Shelley translated it into English. Shelley, like other Romantic readers of Plato, was drawn to the Ion's account of divine inspiration in poetry. He recommended the dialogue to Thomas Love Peacock as a reply to the latter's Four Ages of Poetry: Shelley thought the Ion would refute Peacock's charge that poetry is useless in a practical world.
  • First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company
  •  8
    Socrates' Charitable Treatment of Poetry
    Philosophy and Literature 13 (2): 248-261. 1989.
  •  25
    The poetics' argument against Plato
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (1): 83-100. 1992.
  •  2
    Plato is one of the most important figures in Western thought; the _Republic_ is his most important, and most widely studied, work. This GuideBook will steer the reader clearly through this work. _Plato and the Republic_ will introduce and assess: * Plato's life and the background to the _Republic_ * The text and ideas of the _Republic_ * Plato's continuing importance to Western thought Ideal for students coming to Plato for the first time, this GuideBook will be vital for all students of Plato …Read more
  •  33
    The Impiety of the Republic's Imitator
    Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2): 219-232. 2013.
    The Republic rarely speaks of piety; yet religious concerns inform more of its treatment of poetry than readers acknowledge. A pair of tripartite rankings in Book 10 has puzzled interpreters: first the triad Form-couch-painting, then the ostensibly equivalent triad of a flute’s or bridle’s user-maker-imitator. The tripartitions work better together if one recognizes the divinity at work behind Athena’s gifts the flute and bridle. This mythic reading reveals the imitator to stand, yet again, in o…Read more
  •  95
    Plato on Poetry: Imitation or Inspiration?
    Philosophy Compass 7 (10): 669-678. 2012.
    A passage in Plato’s Laws offers a fresh look at Plato’s theory of poetry and art. Only here does Plato call poetry both mimêsis “imitation, representation,” and the product of enthousiasmos “inspiration, possession.” The Republic and Sophist examine poetic imitation; the Ion and Phaedrus develop a theory of artistic inspiration; but Plato does not confront the two descriptions together outside this paragraph. After all, mimêsis fuels an attack on poetry, while enthousiasmos is sometimes used to…Read more
  •  17
    Plato's Myths
    Philosophical Inquiry 34 (1-2): 101-106. 2011.
  • Plato's Thoughts and Literature
    Dissertation, Harvard University. 1987.
    This dissertation brings Plato's critique of poetry to bear on the issue of how to read his dialogues. Since antiquity commentators on Plato have debated the extent to which he actually meant the philosophical doctrines in his works; since the early nineteenth century this debate has been complicated by the claim that the dialogues count as literature. To treat them as literature is to hold, in a subtler sense, that Plato does not himself assert what their characters say. ;I therefore categorize…Read more
  •  37
    Plato’s Menexenus as a History that Falls into Patterns
    with Mark Zelcer
    Ancient Philosophy 33 (1): 19-31. 2013.
  •  10
    Plato on Justice and Power: Reading Book I of Plato's Republic
    with Kimon Lycos
    Philosophical Review 100 (3): 515. 1991.
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