• Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy Volume 5 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2019.
    This is the fifth volume of Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy. The series aims to publish some of the best contemporary work in the vibrant field of political philosophy and its closely related subfields, including jurisprudence, normative economics, political theory in political science departments, and just war theory.
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    Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy, vol. 2 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2016.
    This is the second volume of Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy. Since its revival in the 1970s political philosophy has been a vibrant field in philosophy, one that intersects with jurisprudence, normative economics, political theory in political science departments, and just war theory. OSPP aims to publish some of the best contemporary work in political philosophy and these closely related subfields. The papers in this volume address a range of central topics and represent cutting edge wo…Read more
  • Of mice and men: equality and animals
    In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality, Clarendon Press. 2006.
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    Neurointerventions: Punishment, Mental Integrity, and Intentions
    American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (3): 131-132. 2018.
  • Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy, Volume 3 (edited book)
    with David Sobel and Steven Wall
    Oxford University Press. 2017.
    This is the third volume of Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy. The series aims to publish some of the best contemporary work in the vibrant field of political philosophy and its closely related subfields, including jurisprudence, normative economics, political theory in political science departments, and just war theory.
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    Ripstein on private wrongs and torts
    Jurisprudence 9 (3): 589-596. 2018.
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    A Tree Can Make a Difference
    with Luc Lauwers
    Journal of Philosophy 114 (1): 33-42. 2017.
    We show that it is not possible to extend the ranking of one-stage lotteries based on their weak-expectation to a reflexive and transitive relation on the collection of one- and two-stage lotteries that satisfies two basic axioms, the minimal value axiom and the reduction axiom. We propose an extension that satisfies only the first axiom. This ranking takes payoffs, their probabilities, and the tree structure into account.
  • No Title available: Reviews
    Economics and Philosophy 13 (2): 330-337. 1997.
  • Book-Reviews (review)
    Mind 100 (397): 139-142. 1991.
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    Teaching Non-Philosophy Faculty to Teach Critical Thinking about Ethical Issues
    with John Accordino
    Liberal Education 84 (2): 46-51. 1998.
    At various universities across the country, philosophers are organizing faculty development workshops for non-philosophy faculty members who want to incorporate critical thinking about ethical and social justice issues into their courses. The demand for such programs is reasonably strong. In part this is due to the increasing pressure from professional associations (e.g., those of nursing and accounting) for the inclusion of ethics in the curriculum. In part, however, it is simply due to the rec…Read more
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    Distributive Justice
    In Robert Goodin, Philip Pettit & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy, Blackwell. 2007.
    The word “justice” is used in several different ways. First, justice is sometimes understood as moral permissibility applied to distributions of benefits and burdens (e.g., income distributions) or social structures (e.g., legal systems). In this sense, justice is distinguished by the kind of entity to which it is applied, rather than a specific kind of moral concern.
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    Moral dilemmas and comparative conceptions of morality
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (1): 117-124. 1992.
    Earl Conee is a well known contemporary defender of the impossibility of moral dilemmas. In his 1982 paper "Against Moral Dilemmas" he argued that moral dilemmas are impossible because the existence of such a dilemma would entail that some obligatory action is forbidden, which is absurd. More recently, in "Why Moral Dilemmas are Impossible" he has defended the impossibility of moral dilemmas by claiming that the moral status of an action depends in part on the moral status of its alternatives…Read more
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    Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy, Volume 1 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press UK. 2015.
    This is the inaugural volume of Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy. Since its revival in the 1970s political philosophy has been a vibrant field in philosophy, one that intersects with jurisprudence, normative economics, political theory in political science departments, and just war theory. OSPP aims to publish some of the best contemporary work in political philosophy and these closely related subfields.
  •  10
    What We Owe to Each Other
    International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1): 102-103. 2000.
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    Equal Negative Liberty and Welfare Rights
    International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2): 237-241. 2011.
    In Are Equal Liberty and Equality Compatible?, Jan Narveson and James Sterba insightfully debate whether a right to maximum equal negative liberty requires, or at least is compatible with, a right to welfare. Narveson argues that the two rights are incompatible, whereas Sterba argues that the rights are compatible and indeed that the right to maximum equal negative liberty requires a right to welfare. I argue that Sterba is correct that the two rights are conceptually compatible and that Narveso…Read more
  •  26
    Left-Libertarianism: A Primer
    In Peter Vallentyne & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Left Libertarianism and Its Critics: The Contemporary Debate, Palgrave Publishers. 2000.
    Left-libertarian theories of justice hold that agents are full self-owners and that natural resources are owned in some egalitarian manner. Unlike most versions of egalitarianism, leftlibertarianism endorses full self-ownership, and thus places specific limits on what others may do to one’s person without one’s permission. Unlike the more familiar right-libertarianism (which also endorses full self-ownership), it holds that natural resources—resources which are not the results of anyone's choice…Read more
  •  97
    Debate: Capabilities versus opportunities for well-being
    Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (3). 2005.
    Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have argued that justice is concerned, at least in part, with the distribution of capabilities (opportunities to function). Richard Arneson, G.A. Cohen, and John Roemer have argued that justice is concerned with something like the distribution of opportunities for well-being. I argue that, although some versions of the capability view are incompatible with some versions of the opportunity for well-being view, the most plausible version of the capability view is id…Read more
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    This is the first volume of Equality and Justice, a six-volume collection of the most important articles of the twentieth century on the topic of justice and equality. This volume addresses the following three (only loosely related) issues: (1) What is the concept of justice? (2) Is justice primarily a demand on individuals or on societies? (3) What are the relative merits of conceptions of justice based on equality, based on priority for those who have less, and based on ensuring that everyone …Read more