•  676
    Three of the chief questions this essay addresses are: 1. What justifies considering Hegel and Maimonides together in a probe of the philosophical psychology of prophetic intelligence? 2. What bearing does intellectual intuition as Hegel and Maimonides understand it have on prophecy approached from this standpoint? 3. How does the relation between intelligence and intuition and prophecy, when explored in light of the answer to the first two questions, deepen our contemporary understanding of pr…Read more
  •  29
    Vico’s Place in the Rehabilitation of Etymology
    New Vico Studies 26 127-142. 2008.
    This is a detailed critical review of the book "Forgotten Paths: Etymology and the Allegorical Mindset" (Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 2007) by David del Bello.
  •  24
    Idealism, Scientia Intuitiva, and Scientific Philosophy
    Review of Metaphysics 66 (2): 339-352. 2012.
    “Considered objectively, there can be only one human reason, there... can be only one true system of philosophy from principles, in however many different and even conflicting ways one has philosophized about the same proposition”—so declares Kant in the Vorrede to the “Doctrine of Right.” Kant makes this observation in the process of framing a striking claim: “prior to the development of critical philosophy there had been no philosophy at all.” Eckart Förster adduces this claim as a point of de…Read more
  •  21
    Mythemically Figuring the Limits of Ethical Reason: The Prelude of Fear and Trembling
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76 137-152. 2002.
    This paper considers how Kierkegaard self-reflexively portrays the tension between the boundary limit of discursive reason and mythic imagination in his classic analysis of Abrahamic faith. Following some reflections on the nature and philosophical implications of that tension, I examine its salient delineation in the Prelude of Fear and Trembling. Through four non-canonical renderings of the biblical Aqedah myth featured in the Prelude, Kierkegaard depicts the limits of ethical reasoning in the…Read more
  •  16
  •  11
    Mythemically Figuring the Limits of Ethical Reason: The Prelude of Fear and Trembling
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76 137-152. 2002.
    This paper considers how Kierkegaard self-reflexively portrays the tension between the boundary limit of discursive reason and mythic imagination in his classic analysis of Abrahamic faith. Following some reflections on the nature and philosophical implications of that tension, I examine its salient delineation in the Prelude of Fear and Trembling. Through four non-canonical renderings of the biblical Aqedah myth featured in the Prelude, Kierkegaard depicts the limits of ethical reasoning in the…Read more
  •  6
    At defining junctures in their writings, philosophers as diverse as Hegel, Kierkegaard, Whitehead, Cassirer, and Heidegger demonstrate that they were keenly alive to the visionary authority of the work of artistic genius as an originally stimulus to the philosophical imagination. This book undertakes to make explicit that shared insight. The inquiry aims not only to demonstrate but also to engender in the reader a firsthand sense of the energizing and speculative value of intermediating conceptu…Read more
  •  4
    German Idealism as Constructivism (review)
    Review of Metaphysics 70 (3). 2017.
  • Keats and the Senses of Being
    The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 21 76-82. 1998.
    With its focus on the pathos of permanence versus temporality as human aporia and on the function — the Werksein — of the work of art genuinely encountered, John Keats’s Ode on a Grecian Urn is a particularly compelling subject for philosophical analysis. The major explications of this most contentiously debated ode in the language have largely focused, however, on various combinations of the poem’s stylistic, structural, linguistic, psychological, aesthetic, historical, symbolic, and intellectu…Read more
  • This volume introduces an original philosophy of Jewish religious thinking as devotional intelligence. It establishes the intellectual warrant of such thinking in light of two related principles: relativity v. intelligence—the metaphysical principle that knowing is of being—and the normative principle of sacral attunement.