•  338
    Control and Flexibility of Interactive Alignment: Mobius Syndrome as a Case Study
    with John Michael, Kathleen Bogart, Kristian Tylen, Joel Krueger, Morten Bech, and John R. Ostergaard
    Cognitive Processing 15 (1). 2014.
  •  335
    Training in compensatory strategies enhances rapport in interactions involving people with Möebius Syndrome
    with John Michael, Kathleen Bogart, Kristian Tylen, Joel Krueger, Morten Bech, and John R. Ostergaard
    Frontiers in Neurology 6 (213): 1-11. 2015.
    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the …Read more
  •  49
    Does interaction matter? Testing whether a confidence heuristic can replace interaction in collective decision-making
    with Dan Bang, Kristian Tylén, Karsten Olsen, Peter E. Latham, Jennifer Y. F. Lau, Andreas Roepstorff, Geraint Rees, Chris D. Frith, and Bahador Bahrami
    Consciousness and Cognition 26 13-23. 2014.
    In a range of contexts, individuals arrive at collective decisions by sharing confidence in their judgements. This tendency to evaluate the reliability of information by the confidence with which it is expressed has been termed the ‘confidence heuristic’. We tested two ways of implementing the confidence heuristic in the context of a collective perceptual decision-making task: either directly, by opting for the judgement made with higher confidence, or indirectly, by opting for the faster judgem…Read more
  •  6
    Language‐Specific Constraints on Conversation: Evidence from Danish and Norwegian
    with Christina Dideriksen, Morten H. Christiansen, Mark Dingemanse, Malte Højmark-Bertelsen, Christer Johansson, and Kristian Tylén
    Cognitive Science 47 (11). 2023.
    Establishing and maintaining mutual understanding in everyday conversations is crucial. To do so, people employ a variety of conversational devices, such as backchannels, repair, and linguistic entrainment. Here, we explore whether the use of conversational devices might be influenced by cross‐linguistic differences in the speakers’ native language, comparing two matched languages—Danish and Norwegian—differing primarily in their sound structure, with Danish being more opaque, that is, less acou…Read more
  •  11
    Repeat After Me? Both Children With and Without Autism Commonly Align Their Language With That of Their Caregivers
    with Ethan Weed, Roberta Rocca, Deborah Fein, and Letitia Naigles
    Cognitive Science 47 (11). 2023.
    Linguistic repetitions in children are conceptualized as negative in children with autism – echolalia, without communicative purpose – and positive in typically developing (TD) children – linguistic alignment involved in shared engagement, common ground and language acquisition. To investigate this apparent contradiction we analyzed spontaneous speech in 67 parent–child dyads from a longitudinal corpus (30 minutes of play activities at 6 visits over 2 years). We included 32 children with autism …Read more
  •  24
    The Social Route to Abstraction: Interaction and Diversity Enhance Performance and Transfer in a Rule‐Based Categorization Task
    with Kristian Tylén, Sara Møller Østergaard, Pernille Smith, and Jakob Arnoldi
    Cognitive Science 47 (9). 2023.
    Capacities for abstract thinking and problem‐solving are central to human cognition. Processes of abstraction allow the transfer of experiences and knowledge between contexts helping us make informed decisions in new or changing contexts. While we are often inclined to relate such reasoning capacities to individual minds and brains, they may in fact be contingent on human‐specific modes of collaboration, dialogue, and shared attention. In an experimental study, we test the hypothesis that social…Read more
  •  12
    The Dynamic Interplay of Kinetic and Linguistic Coordination in Danish and Norwegian Conversation
    with James P. Trujillo, Christina Dideriksen, Kristian Tylén, and Morten H. Christiansen
    Cognitive Science 47 (6). 2023.
    In conversation, individuals work together to achieve communicative goals, complementing and aligning language and body with each other. An important emerging question is whether interlocutors entrain with one another equally across linguistic levels (e.g., lexical, syntactic, and semantic) and modalities (i.e., speech and gesture), or whether there are complementary patterns of behaviors, with some levels or modalities diverging and others converging in coordinated fashions. This study assesses…Read more
  •  39
    Diagrammatic reasoning: Abstraction, interaction, and insight
    with Kristian Tylén, Johanne Stege Bjørndahl, Joanna Raczaszek-Leonardi, Svend Østergaard, and Frederik Stjernfelt
    Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (2): 264-283. 2014.
    Many types of everyday and specialized reasoning depend on diagrams: we use maps to find our way, we draw graphs and sketches to communicate concepts and prove geometrical theorems, and we manipulate diagrams to explore new creative solutions to problems. The active involvement and manipulation of representational artifacts for purposes of thinking and communicating is discussed in relation to C.S. Peirce’s notion of diagrammatical reasoning. We propose to extend Peirce’s original ideas and sket…Read more
  •  49
    Beyond Single‐Mindedness: A Figure‐Ground Reversal for the Cognitive Sciences
    with Mark Dingemanse, Andreas Liesenfeld, Marlou Rasenberg, Saul Albert, Felix K. Ameka, Abeba Birhane, Dimitris Bolis, Justine Cassell, Rebecca Clift, Elena Cuffari, Hanne De Jaegher, Catarina Dutilh Novaes, N. J. Enfield, Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Edwin Hutchins, Ivana Konvalinka, Damian Milton, Joanna Rączaszek-Leonardi, Vasudevi Reddy, Federico Rossano, David Schlangen, Johanna Seibtbb, Elizabeth Stokoe, Lucy Suchman, Cordula Vesper, Thalia Wheatley, and Martina Wiltschko
    Cognitive Science 47 (1). 2023.
    A fundamental fact about human minds is that they are never truly alone: all minds are steeped in situated interaction. That social interaction matters is recognized by any experimentalist who seeks to exclude its influence by studying individuals in isolation. On this view, interaction complicates cognition. Here, we explore the more radical stance that interaction co-constitutes cognition: that we benefit from looking beyond single minds toward cognition as a process involving interacting mind…Read more
  •  9
    Agreeing is not enough
    with Johanne Stege Bjørndahl, Svend østergaard, and Kristian Tylén
    Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (3): 495-525. 2015.
    Collaborative interaction pervades many everyday practices: work meetings, innovation and product design, education and arts. Previous studies have pointed to the central role of acknowledgement and acceptance for the success of joint action, by creating affiliation and signaling understanding. We argue that various forms of explicit miscommunication are just as critical to challenge, negotiate and integrate individual contributions in collaborative creative activities. Through qualitative micro…Read more
  •  11
    Carving language for social coordination
    with Kristian Tylén
    Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 13 (1): 103-124. 2012.
    Human social coordination is often mediated by language. Through verbal dialogue, people direct each other’s attention to properties of their shared environment, they discuss how to jointly solve problems, share their introspections, and distribute roles and assignments. In this article, we propose a dynamical framework for the study of the coordinative role of language. Based on a review of a number of recent experimental studies, we argue that shared symbolic patterns emerge and stabilize thro…Read more
  •  1
    The adaptive evolution of early human symbolic behavior
    with Katrin Heimann, Sergio Rojo, Niels Nørkjær Johannsen, Felix Riede, Nicolas Fay, Marlize Lombard, and Kristian Tylén
  •  29
    Diagrammatic reasoning: An introduction
    with Kristian Tylén
    Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (2): 183-186. 2014.
    Many types of everyday and specialized reasoning depend on diagrams: we use maps to fnd our way, we draw graphs and sketches to communicate concepts and prove geometrical theorems, and we manipulate diagrams to explore new creative solutions to problems. While the linear and symbolic character of verbal language has long served as the predominant model of human thought, it is remarkable how — through a range of contexts — thinking and communication critically depend on manipulations of external,…Read more
  •  15
    Hearing me hearing you: Reciprocal effects between child and parent language in autism and typical development
    with Ethan Weed, Deborah Fein, and Letitia Naigles
    Cognition 183 (C): 1-18. 2019.
  •  20
    The emergence of systematicity: How environmental and communicative factors shape a novel communication system
    with Jonas Nölle, Marlene Staib, and Kristian Tylén
    Cognition 181 (C): 93-104. 2018.
  •  66
    Dialog as interpersonal synergy
    with Joanna Raczaszek-Leonardi and Kristian Tylén
    New Ideas in Psychology. 2013.
    What is the proper unit of analysis in the psycholinguistics of dialog? While classical approaches are largely based on models of individual linguistic processing, recent advances stress the social coordinative nature of dialog. In the influential interactive alignment model, dialogue is thus approached as the progressive entrainment of interlocutors' linguistic behaviors toward the alignment of situation models. Still, the driving mechanisms are attributed to individual cognition in the form of…Read more
  •  1332
    A growing conceptual and empirical literature is advancing the idea that language extends our cognitive skills. One of the most influential positions holds that language – qua material symbols – facilitates individual thought processes by virtue of its material properties (Clark, 2006a). Extending upon this model, we argue that language enhances our cognitive capabilities in a much more radical way: the skilful engagement of public material symbols facilitates evolutionarily unprecedented modes …Read more
  •  20
    Agreeing is not enough: The constructive role of miscommunication
    with Johanne Stege Bjørndahl, Svend ∅Stergaard, and Kristian Tylén
    Interaction Studies 16 (3): 495-525. 2015.
    Collaborative interaction pervades everyday practices: work meetings, innovation and product design, education and arts. Previous studies have pointed to the central role of acknowledgement and acceptance for the success of joint action, by creating affiliation and signaling understanding. We argue that various forms of explicit miscommunication are just as critical to challenge, negotiate and integrate individual contributions in collaborative creative activities. Through qualitative microanaly…Read more
  •  38
    Linguistic coordination: models, dynamics and effects
    with Kristian Tylén
    New Ideas in Psychology. 2013.
  •  60
    Carving language for social coordination: A dynamical approach
    with Kristian Tylén
    Interaction Studies 13 (1): 103-124. 2012.
    Human social coordination is often mediated by language. Through verbal dialogue, people direct each other’s attention to properties of their shared environment, they discuss how to jointly solve problems, share their introspections, and distribute roles and assignments. In this article, we propose a dynamical framework for the study of the coordinative role of language. Based on a review of a number of recent experimental studies, we argue that shared symbolic patterns emerge and stabilize thro…Read more
  •  32
    The intersubjectivity of embodiment
    with Paolo Demuru and Anna Borghi
    Journal of Cognitive Semiotics 4. 2012.
  •  1
    The self organization of human interaction
    with Rick Dale, Nicholas Duran, and Daniel Richardson
    Psychology of Learning and Motivation 59. 2013.
    We describe a “centipede’s dilemma” that faces the sciences of human interaction. Research on human interaction has been involved in extensive theoretical debate, although the vast majority of research tends to focus on a small set of human behaviors, cognitive processes, and interactive contexts. The problem is that naturalistic human interaction must integrate all of these factors simultaneously, and grander theoretical mitigation cannot come only from focused experimental or computational age…Read more
  •  56
    Coming to terms: Quantifying the benefits of linguistic coordination
    with Bahador Bahrami, Karsten Olsen, Andreas Roepstorff, Geraint Rees, Chris Frith, and Kristian Tylén
    Psychological Science 23 (8): 931-939. 2012.
    Sharing a public language facilitates particularly efficient forms of joint perception and action by giving interlocutors refined tools for directing attention and aligning conceptual models and action. We hypothesized that interlocutors who flexibly align their linguistic practices and converge on a shared language will improve their cooperative performance on joint tasks. To test this prediction, we employed a novel experimental design, in which pairs of participants cooperated linguistically …Read more
  •  62
    This study investigates interpersonal processes underlying dialog by comparing two approaches, interactive alignment and interpersonal synergy, and assesses how they predict collective performance in a joint task. While the interactive alignment approach highlights imitative patterns between interlocutors, the synergy approach points to structural organization at the level of the interaction—such as complementary patterns straddling speech turns and interlocutors. We develop a general, quantitat…Read more
  •  103
    Making sense together: a dynamical account of linguistic meaning making
    with Kristian Tylén, Peer F. Bundgaard, and Svend Østergaard
    Semiotica 2013 (194): 39-62. 2013.
    How is linguistic communication possible? How do we come to share the same meanings of words and utterances? One classical position holds that human beings share a transcendental “platonic” ideality independent of individual cognition and language use (Frege 1948). Another stresses immanent linguistic relations (Saussure 1959), and yet another basic embodied structures as the ground for invariant aspects of meaning (Lakoff and Johnson 1999). Here we propose an alternative account in which the po…Read more