•  83
    Moral status is the moral value that something has in its own right, independently of the interests or concerns of others. Research using human embryonic stem cells implicates issues about moral status because the current method of extracting hESCs involves the destruction of a human embryo, the moral status of which is contested. Moral status issues can also arise, however, when hESCs are transplanted into embryonic or fetal animals, thereby creating human/ nonhuman stem cell chimeras. In parti…Read more
  •  82
    Respecting the autonomy of european and american consumers: Defending positive labels on gm foods
    with Alan Rubel
    Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (1): 75-84. 2004.
    In her recent article, Does autonomy count in favor of labeling genetically modified food?, Kirsten Hansen argues that in Europe, voluntary negative labeling of non-GM foods respects consumer autonomy just as well as mandatory positive labeling of foods with GM content. She also argues that because negative labeling places labeling costs upon those consumers that want to know whether food is GM, negative labeling is better policy than positive labeling. In this paper, we argue that Hansens argum…Read more
  •  82
    At the edge of humanity: Human stem cells, chimeras, and moral status
    Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4): 347-370. 2005.
    : Experiments involving the transplantation of human stem cells and their derivatives into early fetal or embryonic nonhuman animals raise novel ethical issues due to their possible implications for enhancing the moral status of the chimeric individual. Although status-enhancing research is not necessarily objectionable from the perspective of the chimeric individual, there are grounds for objecting to it in the conditions in which it is likely to occur. Translating this ethical conclusion into …Read more
  •  78
    We explore the ethics of deliberately exposing consenting adults to SARS-CoV-2 to induce immunity to the virus (“DEI” for short). We explain what a responsible DEI program might look like. We explore a consequentialist argument for DEI according to which DEI is a viable harm-reduction strategy. Then we consider a non-consequentialist argument for DEI that draws on the moral significance of consent. Additionally, we consider arguments for the view that DEI is unethical on the grounds that, given …Read more
  •  59
    An Ethical Analysis of Ojibway Objections to Genomics and Genetics Research on Wild Rice
    Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2): 37-45. 2005.
    I analyze Ojibway objections to genomics and genetics research on wild rice. Although key academic and industry participants in this research have dismissed their objections out of hand, my analysis supports the conclusion that the objections merit serious consideration, even by those who do not share the Ojibway’s religious beliefs
  •  57
    This book provides a sophisticated analysis of various types of moral relativism, showing how arguments both for and against them fail to account for the basic intuitions such theories were inteded to address. Streiffer then constructs a compelling alternative model of reasons for acting which avoids the pitfalls of theories earlier discussed.
  •  45
    Informed consent and federal funding for stem cell research
    Hastings Center Report 38 (3). 2008.
    A review of the consent forms signed by those who donated embryos for the NIH-approved embryonic stem cell lines reveals several problems, providing ethical as well as scientific reasons to overturn the Bush administration’s restrictions on federal funding for stem cell research.
  •  45
    The political import of intrinsic objections to genetically engineered food
    with Thomas Hedemann
    Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2): 191-210. 2005.
    Many people object to genetically engineerehd (GE) food because they believe that it is unnatural or that its creation amounts to playing God. These objections are often referred to as intrinsic objections, and they have been widely criticized in the agricultural bioethics literature as being unsound, incompatible with modern science, religious, inchoate, and based on emotion instead of reason. Many of their critics also argue that even if these objections did have some merit as ethicalobjection…Read more
  •  42
    At the Edge of Humanity: Human Stem Cells, Chimeras, and Moral Status
    Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement): 63-83. 2007.
    Experiments involving the transplantation of human stem cells and their derivatives into early fetal or embryonic nonhuman animals raise novel ethical issues due to their possible implications for enhancing the moral status of the chimeric individual. Although status-enhancing research is not necessarily objectionable from the perspective of the chimeric individual, there are grounds for objecting to it in the conditions in which it is likely to occur. Translating this ethical conclusion into a …Read more
  •  36
    Academic freedom and academic-industry relationships in biotechnology
    Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (2): 129-149. 2006.
    : Commercial academic-industry relationships (AIRs) are widespread in biotechnology and have resulted in a wide array of restrictions on academic research. Objections to such restrictions have centered on the charge that they violate academic freedom. I argue that these objections are almost invariably unsuccessful. On a consequentialist understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on unfounded empirical claims about the overall effects that AIRs have on academic research. And on a …Read more
  •  34
    In Defense of the Moral Relevance of Species Boundaries
    American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3): 37-38. 2003.
    No abstract
  •  29
    Medical privacy and the public's right to vote: What presidential candidates should disclose
    with Alan P. Rubel and Julie R. Fagan
    Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4). 2006.
    We argue that while presidential candidates have the right to medical privacy, the public nature and importance of the presidency generates a moral requirement that candidates waive those rights in certain circumstances. Specifically, candidates are required to disclose information about medical conditions that are likely to seriously undermine their ability to fulfill what we call the "core functions" of the office of the presidency. This requirement exists because (1) people have the right to …Read more
  •  27
    Harming animals for research and for food in conditions of moral uncertainty
    Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7): 453-454. 2019.
    Koplin and Wilkinson argue for the sociological claim that many believe that the moral uncertainty argument provides significant moral reasons against farming human–pig chimaeras for their organs but that there no are significant moral reasons against farming non-chimeric pigs for food. And yet, K&W argue for the ethical claim, that if the moral uncertainty argument provides significant moral reasons against farming for organs then there are similar moral reasons against farming for food. The mo…Read more
  •  27
    Vexing Nature?
    Environmental Ethics 27 (2): 213-216. 2005.
  •  23
  •  23
    Animal biotechnology and the non-identity problem
    American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6). 2008.
    No abstract
  •  20
    Review of Julian Savulescu, Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement (review)
    Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2). 2010.
  •  20
    The current debate about labeling genetically engineered (GE) food focuses on food derived from GE crops, neglecting food derived from GE animals. This is not surprising, as GE animal products have not yet reached the market. Participants in the debate may also be assuming that conclusions about GE crops automatically extend to GE animals. But there are two GE animals - the Enviropig and the AquAdvantage Bred salmon - that are approaching the market, animals raise more ethical issues than plants…Read more
  •  4
    Robert Streiffer replies
    Hastings Center Report 38 (6): 6-6. 2008.
  •  1
    • A coin appears to be elliptical when looked at from an angle, but it’s round. • A stick appears to be bent when it is partly immersed in water, but it’s straight. • An oasis appears to exist, but it doesn’t. • A bucket of water appears to be two different temperatures to two different hands, but it’s all..
  • In this paper, I will attempt to concisely present Moore’s article “A Defence of Common Sense.” It is a collection of discussions of four points, loosely tied together by the commonality that Moore’s position regarding these points differs from positions taken up by some other philosophers.
  • According to Autumn Fiester, the Presumption of Restraint—the thesis that an application of biotechnology to an animal is unethical unless backed by morally compelling reasons—is justified by five ethical claims. In this commentary, I explore the relevance of what Derek Parfit has dubbed the Non-Identity Problem for the implications of one of these claims, the Animal Welfare Claim. I conclude that while the Animal Welfare Claim condemns the alteration of founder animals in ways that are bad for …Read more
  • I saw a poster the other day that said: “Living. It’s the only thing worth dying for.” Now, I’m not sure what that means really—in fact, I think it is an advertisement for a clothing company—but it brings up an interesting issue or cluster of issues. Are there things worth dying for? Or, and I know this is a very different question, are there things worth killing for? This is the question which we are going to talk about this week and next. Of course, we’ll be talking about it on an internationa…Read more
  • The problem: we’re spending a lot without commensurate benefit Spending: 1. Health costs are about 14% of GNP, and are expected to exceed 30% by the year 2030 2. Estimated that the use of new technology and the overuse of existing technology accounts..
  • If Dworkin’s theory of civil disobedience is right, then the scientists, given their objections, would not have been justified in civil disobedience. However, they could have been justified, had they chosen to object on grounds provided by just war theory or by an account of democratic legitimacy.