• University of Helsinki
    Department of Philosophy (Theoretical Philosophy, Practical Philosophy, Philosophy in Swedish)
    Researcher
  •  369
    : The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
  •  202
    The aim of this paper is to show that Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex has been mistakenly interpreted as a theory of gender, because interpreters have failed adequately to understand Beauvoir's aims. Beauvoir is not trying to explain facts, events, or states of affairs, but to reveal, unveil, or uncover (découvrir) meanings. She explicates the meanings of woman, female, and feminine. Instead of a theory, Beauvoir's book presents a phenomenological description of the sexual difference
  •  162
    This paper problematizes the analogy that Hubert Dreyfus has presented between phenomenology and cognitive science. It argues that Dreyfus presents Merleau-Ponty''s modification of Husserl''s phenomenology in a misleading way. He ignores the idea of philosophy as a radical interrogation and self-responsibility that stems from Husserl''s work and recurs in Merleau-Ponty''s Phenomenology of Perception. The paper focuses on Merleau-Ponty''s understanding of the phenomenological reduction. It shows …Read more
  •  65
    Anonymity and personhood: Merleau-Ponty’s account of the subject of perception
    Continental Philosophy Review 48 (2): 123-142. 2015.
    Several commentators have argued that with his concept of anonymity Merleau-Ponty breaks away from classical Husserlian phenomenology that is methodologically tied to the first person perspective. Many contemporary commentators see Merleau-Ponty’s discourse on anonymity as a break away from Husserl’s framework that is seen as hopelessly subjectivistic and solipsistic. Some judge and reproach it as a disastrous misunderstanding that leads to a confusion of philosophical and empirical concerns. Bo…Read more
  •  65
    Sara HeinSmaa rediscovers neglected passages of Le Duexi_me Sexe in her quest to follow Simone de Beauvoir's line of thinking. She finds the masterpiece to be grounded in the work of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty
  •  51
    The self and the others: Common topics for Husserl and Wittgenstein
    Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2): 234-249. 2012.
    Several commentators have argued that Husserl's phenomenological project is compromised or even destroyed by Wittgenstein's critical inquiries into our use of psychological concepts. In contrast to oppositional interpretations, this paper explicates certain crucial connections between Husserl's phenomenology and Wittgenstein's late thinking—shared views that concern the embodied nature of selfhood and our relations to other selves. In line with certain recent contributions, I argue that there ar…Read more
  •  48
    The aim of this paper is to investigate, if there is a principal disagreement between Husserl's early concept of expression and his later discussions on gestures. In the early work Logical Investigations (1900–1901), Husserl quite bluntly excludes gestures from the category of meaningful expressions; thirty years later (1928), in the second volume of Ideas, he argues to the contrary that gestures are meaningful and expressive in the very same way as linguistic units, words and sentences. The que…Read more
  •  30
    On the Complexity and Wholeness of Human Beings: Husserlian Perspectives
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies 25 (3): 393-406. 2017.
    At the beginning of Being and Time, Heidegger rejects Husserl’s classical phenomenology on three grounds: he claims that Husserlian phenomenology is impaired by indeterminate concepts, by naïve personalism, and by obscurities in its account of individuation. The paper studies the validity of this early critique by explicating Husserl’s discourse on human persons as bodily-spiritual beings and by clarifying his account of the principles by which such beings can be individuated. The paper offers t…Read more
  •  29
    Book reviews (review)
    with Erwin M. Segal, Meredith Williams, David J. Cole, James Geller, Yorick Wilks, Shoshana Loeb, Kim Sterelny, Jerry Fodor, and Ausonio Marras
    Minds and Machines 3 (3): 335-375. 1993.
  •  28
    Sex, Gender, and Embodiment
    In Dan Zahavi (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology, Oxford University Press. 2012.
    This chapter develops an alternative to the dominant articulation of human existence on the basis of classical phenomenology, arguing that Edmund Husserl's phenomenological inquiries into the structures of embodiment provide a very different and more fruitful starting point for the investigation of sexual difference than the ideas of social gender and biological sex. The ways of classifying sex and gender characteristics mark them out on several different conceptual bases, and thus their categor…Read more
  •  17
    Values of love: two forms of infinity characteristic of human persons
    Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (3): 431-450. 2020.
    In his late reflections on values and forms of life from the 1920s and 1930s, Husserl develops the concept of personal value and argues that these values open two kinds of infinities in our lives. On the one hand personal values disclose infinite emotive depths in human individuals while on the other hand they connect human individuals in continuous and progressive chains of care. In order to get at the core of the concept, I will explicate Husserl’s discussion of personal values of love by dist…Read more
  •  16
    The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
  •  16
    Ambiguity and difference: Two feminist ethics of the present
    In E. A. Parker & A. van Leeuwen (eds.), Differences: Rereading Beauvoir and Irigaray, Oxford University Press. pp. 137-176. 2018.
    The chapter studies the ethical dimensions of Beauvoir’s existentialism and Irigaray’s ontology of difference. It argues that Irigaray builds on one central but largely neglected result of Beauvoir’s moral philosophical argumentation: the claim that fundamentally sexual subordination constitutes an ethical problem that cannot be adequately solved merely through social reforms, political interventions, or theoretical reflections. By comparing Beauvoir’s concept of erotic generosity to Irigaray’s …Read more
  •  15
    The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
  •  15
    Review of Taylor Carman, Merleau-Ponty (review)
    Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10). 2010.
  •  13
    Embodiment and feminist philosophy
    In A. Stone, A. Garry & S. J. Khader (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Routledge. pp. 180-193. 2017.
    peerReviewed.
  •  11
  •  9
    Introduction: Phenomenological approaches to Tove Jansson’s fiction
    with Joona Taipale
    SATS 19 (1): 1-4. 2018.
    This article investigates the emotional undercurrents of Tove Jansson’s Moominvalley in November. I argue that one of the main characters of Jansson’s book is the autumn forest that surrounds the abandoned Moomin house. The decomposing forest is not just an emblem of the inner lives of the guests that gather in the house but is an active character itself: an ambiguous life form that creeps in the house and must be expelled from its living core. I further demonstrate that the emotion of disgust h…Read more
  •  9
    This article investigates the emotional undercurrents of Tove Jansson’s Moominvalley in November. I argue that one of the main characters of Jansson’s book is the autumn forest that surrounds the abandoned Moomin house. The decomposing forest is not just an emblem of the inner lives of the guests that gather in the house but is an active character itself: an ambiguous life form that creeps in the house and must be expelled from its living core. I further demonstrate that the emotion of disgust h…Read more
  •  9
    7 Psychoanalysis of Things: Objective Meanings or Subjective Projections?
    In Christine Daigle & Jacob Golomb (eds.), Beauvoir and Sartre: The Riddle of Influence, Indiana University Press. pp. 128. 2009.
  •  6
    Correction to: Values of love: two forms of infinity characteristic of human persons
    Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (3): 451-452. 2020.
    The original version of this article unfortunately contains incorrect article title and incorrect data in the body text.