•  139
    The apparent truth of dualism and the uncanny body
    Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2): 263-278. 2008.
    It has been suggested that our experiences of embodiment in general appear to constitute an experiential ground for dualist philosophy and that this is particularly so with experiences of dissociation, in which one feels estranged from one’s body. Thus, Drew Leder argues that these play “a crucial role in encouraging and supporting Cartesian dualism” as they “seem to support the doctrine of an immaterial mind trapped inside an alien body”. In this paper I argue that as dualism does not capture t…Read more
  •  83
    Are we our brains?
    Philosophical Investigations 32 (2): 113-133. 2009.
    My aim in this paper is to destabilise the brain-is-self thesis, something that is now regarded in some quarters as philosophical commonsense. My contention is that it is the epithelial body that enters into the formation of our sense of self and that largely bears the burden of personal identity as well as playing the key role in grounding our psychological ascriptions. Lacking any sensorimotor or social presence of its own, the brain by itself cannot "underlie" selfhood, but only as part of th…Read more
  •  56
    Spin, truth and lies
    The Philosophers' Magazine 28 (28): 73-77. 2004.
  •  22
    The creation of equals
    Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (4): 485-506. 2009.
    Karl Jaspers argued that academics must be prepared to accept, perhaps even to welcome, the fact that most students 'will learn next to nothing' from a university education. In this paper I shall argue that, while Jaspers' model is unpersuasive as an ideal and inaccurate as a description, there is an uncomfortable truth lurking behind his forthright but gloomy conclusion; viz., that university teaching pays little direct attention to the needs of the student in the wider world (i.e. to the needs…Read more
  •  16
    Imitation, indwelling and the embodied self
    Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (2). 2007.
    In this paper I argue that recent developments in higher education presuppose a conceptual framework that fails plausibly to account for indispensable aspects of educational experience—in particular that a university education is fundamentally a project of personal transformation within a particular social order. It fails, I suggest, primarily because it consists of mutually supporting but erroneous conceptualisations of knowledge and the human subject. In pursuit of transparency and codificatio…Read more
  •  15
    Descartes' Dualism, de Gordon Baker and Katherine J. Morris
    Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 16 (1): 112-114. 1996.
  •  13
    Universities without embarrassment
    Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (3). 2003.
  •  12
    Tacit knowledge and public accounts
    with Stella González Arnal
    Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (3). 2003.
  •  8
    Spin, truth and lies
    The Philosophers' Magazine 26 46-48. 2004.
  •  8
    Greening the radiant city
    Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1). 2002.
  •  4
    Spin, truth and lies: an open debate
    The Philosophers' Magazine 28 73-77. 2004.
  •  4
    Imitation, Indwelling and the Embodied Self
    Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (2): 118-134. 2007.
    In this paper I argue that recent developments in higher education presuppose a conceptual framework that fails plausibly to account for indispensable aspects of educational experience—in particular that a university education is fundamentally a project of personal transformation within a particular social order. It fails, I suggest, primarily because it consists of mutually supporting but erroneous conceptualisations of knowledge and the human subject. In pursuit of transparency and codificatio…Read more
  •  3
    The Creation of Equals
    Philosophy of Education 43 (4): 485-506. 2009.
    Karl Jaspers argued that academics must be prepared to accept, perhaps even to welcome, the fact that most students ‘will learn next to nothing’ from a university education. In this paper I shall argue that, while Jaspers' model is unpersuasive as an ideal and inaccurate as a description, there is an uncomfortable truth lurking behind his forthright but gloomy conclusion; viz., that university teaching pays little direct attention to the needs of the student in the wider world and pays even less…Read more
  •  1
    Philosophy of Mind
    Mcgill-Queen's University Press. 1999.
    Machine generated contents note: 1 The Cartesian legacy -- The dominant paradigm -- Cartesian dualism -- The secret life of the body -- The Cartesian theatre -- The domain of reason -- The causal relevance of the mind -- Conclusion -- Further reading --2 Reductionism and the road to functionalism -- Causation, scientific realism, and physicalism -- Reductionism and central state materialism -- Problems with central state materialism -- Modified ontological physicalism: supervenience -- Modified …Read more
  •  1
    Tacit Knowledge and Public Accounts
    with Stella Arnal
    Philosophy of Education 37 (3): 377-391. 2003.
  •  1
    An Introduction to Metaphilosophy
    with Søren Overgaard and Paul Gilbert
    Cambridge University Press. 2013.
    What is philosophy? How should we do it? Why should we bother to? These are the kinds of questions addressed by metaphilosophy - the philosophical study of the nature of philosophy itself. Students of philosophy today are faced with a confusing and daunting array of philosophical methods, approaches and styles and also deep divisions such as the notorious rift between analytic and Continental philosophy. This book takes readers through a full range of approaches - analytic versus Continental, sc…Read more
  • Christopher Falzon Philosophy Goes to the Movies
    Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1): 115-117. 2003.