•  17
    Technological Unemployment, Meaning in Life, Purpose of Business, and the Future of Stakeholders
    with Alan Scheller-Wolf
    Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2): 319-337. 2019.
    We offer a precautionary account of why business managers should proactively rethink about what kinds of automation firms ought to implement, by exploring two challenges that automation will potentially pose. We engage the current debate concerning whether life without work opportunities will incur a meaning crisis, offering an argument in favor of the position that if technological unemployment occurs, the machine age may be a structurally limited condition for many without work opportunities t…Read more
  •  8
    Body mass index and self-employment in south korea
    with Euna Han
    Journal of Biosocial Science 49 (4): 463-477. 2017.
  •  14
    Gamification of Labor and the Charge of Exploitation
    Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1): 27-39. 2018.
    Recently, business organizations have increasingly turned to a novel form of non-monetary incentives—that is, “gamification,” which refers to a motivation technique using video game elements, such as digital points, badges, and friendly competition in non-game contexts like workplaces. The introduction of gamification to the context of human resource management has immediately become embroiled in serious moral debates. Most notable is the accusation that using gamification as a motivation tool, …Read more
  •  22
    More than just a game: ethical issues in gamification
    with Kevin Werbach
    Ethics and Information Technology 18 (2): 157-173. 2016.
    Gamification is the use of elements and techniques from video game design in non-game contexts. Amid the rapid growth of this practice, normative questions have been under-explored. The primary goal of this article is to develop a normatively sophisticated and descriptively rich account for appropriately addressing major ethical considerations associated with gamification. The framework suggests that practitioners and designers should be precautious about, primarily, but not limited to, whether …Read more
  •  14
    Association of Market, Operational, and Financial Factors with Nonprofit Hospitals' Capital Investment
    with Michael J. McCue
    Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 45 (2): 215-231. 2008.
  • Chosŏn Sŏngnihak Ŭi Yŏksasang
    Kyŏnghŭi Taehakkyo ChʻulpʻanʼGuk. 2006.
  •  75
    Workplace Civility: A Confucian Approach
    with Alan Strudler
    Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3): 557-577. 2012.
    We argue that Confucianism makes a fundamental contribution to understanding why civility is necessary for a morally decent workplace. We begin by reviewing some limits that traditional moral theories face in analyzing issues of civility. We then seek to establish a Confucian alternative. We develop the Confucian idea that even in business, humans may be sacred when they observe rituals culturally determined to express particular ceremonial significance. We conclude that managers and workers sho…Read more
  •  36
    The “I” in ISCT: Normative and Empirical Facets of Integration
    with Katherina Glac
    Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4): 693-705. 2009.
    Integrative social contracts theory is a novel approach to normative questions and has been widely evaluated, discussed, and applied by academics and practitioners alike. While the "I" in ISCT leads the title, it has not received the analytical attention it deserves, especially since the "integrative" component in ISCT is multifaceted and at the conceptual core of the theory. In this paper we therefore take a closer look at two facets of integration. First, we examine the normative integration t…Read more
  •  10
    Decent Termination: A Moral Case for Severance Pay
    Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (2): 203-227. 2014.
    People are often involuntarily laid off from their jobs through no fault of their own. Employees who are dismissed in this manner cannot always legitimately hold employers accountable for these miserable situations because the decision to implement layoffs is often the best possible outcome given the context—that is, layoffs in and of themselves may be “necessary evils.” Yet, even in circumstances in which layoffs qualify as “necessary evils,” morality demands that employers respect the dignity …Read more
  •  12
    Workplace Civility: A Confucian Approach
    Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3): 557-577. 2012.
    We argue that Confucianism makes a fundamental contribution to understanding why civility is necessary for a morally decent workplace. We begin by reviewing some limits that traditional moral theories face in analyzing issues of civility. We then seek to establish a Confucian alternative. We develop the Confucian idea that even in business, humans may be sacred when they observe rituals culturally determined to express particular ceremonial significance. We conclude that managers and workers sho…Read more
  •  17
    Hierarchies and Dignity: A Confucian Communitarian Approach
    with Jessica A. Kennedy and Alan Strudler
    Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (4): 479-502. 2016.
    ABSTRACT:We discuss workers’ dignity in hierarchical organizations. First, we explain why a conflict exists between high-ranking individuals’ authority and low-ranking individuals’ dignity. Then, we ask whether there is any justification that reconciles hierarchical authority with the dignity of workers. We advance a communitarian justification for hierarchical authority, drawing upon Confucianism, which provides that workers can justifiably accept hierarchical authority when it enables a certai…Read more
  •  17
    Decent Termination in advance
    Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (2). 2014.
  •  14
    Bounded Ethicality and The Principle That “Ought” Implies “Can”
    with Rosemarie Monge and Alan Strudler
    Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (3): 341-361. 2015.
  •  23
    Confucian Ethics and Labor Rights
    Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4): 565-594. 2014.