• Moral Relativism and Chinese Philosophy: David Wong and His Critics (edited book)
    with Yang Xiao
    State University of New York Press. 2014.
    _A wide ranging consideration of the work of contemporary ethicist David Wong._
  •  1
    Brahman and Dao: Comparative Studies of Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion (edited book)
    with Ram Nath Jha, Sophia Katz, Friederike Assandri, Nicholas F. Gier, Alexus McLeod, Tim Connolly, Livia Kohn, Wei Zhang, Joshua Capitanio, Guang Xing, Bill M. Mak, John M. Thompson, Carl Olson, and Gad C. Isay
    Lexington Books. 2013.
    Although there are various studies comparing Greek and Indian philosophy and religion, and Chinese and Western philosophy and religion, Brahman and Dao: Comparatives Studies in Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion is a first of its kind that brings together Indian and Chinese philosophies and religions. Brahman and Dao helps close the gap on a much needed examination on the rich history of Buddhist transmission to China, and the many generations of Indian Buddhist missionaries to China and…Read more
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    Journal of Chinese Philosophy, Volume 47, Issue 3-4, Page 283-294, September–December 2020.
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    Justice as a Personal Virtue and Justice as an Institutional Virtue: Mencius’s Confucian Virtue Politics
    Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2019 (4): 277-294. 2020.
    It has been widely observed that virtue ethics, regarded as an ethics of the ancient, in contrast to deontology and consequentialism, seen as an ethics of the modern, is experiencing an impressive revival and is becoming a strong rival to utilitarianism and deontology in the English-speaking world in the last a few decades. Despite this, it has been perceived as having an obvious weakness in comparison with its two major rivals. While both utilitarianism and deontology can at the same time serve…Read more
  •  18
    Dao Companion to Zhu Xi’s Philosophy (edited book)
    with Kai-Chiu Ng
    Springer. 2020.
    Zhu Xi has been commonly and justifiably recognized as the most influential philosopher of Neo-Confucianism, a revival of classical Confucianism in face of the challenges coming from Daoism and, more importantly, Buddhism. His place in the Confucian tradition is often and also very plausibly compared to that of Thomas Aquinas, slightly later, in the Christian tradition. This book presents the most comprehensive and updated study of this great philosopher. It situates Zhu Xi’s philosophy in the h…Read more
  •  13
    Bell's Model of Meritocracy for China: Two Confucian Amendments
    Philosophy East and West 69 (2): 559-568. 2019.
    Daniel Bell's The China Model: Political Meritocracy and the Limits of Democracy is a significant contribution to contemporary political theory. I am very much in sympathy with his ideal of political meritocracy, although I would disagree with him on the degree to which it is realized or practiced in China today; for me, the reality is as distant from Bell's ideal of political meritocracy, if I understand it correctly, as it is from democracy. However, in the present comment, I will not exploit …Read more
  •  5
    "Why Be Moral?" and Other Matters: Reply to Liu, Tiwald, and Yu
    Philosophy East and West 69 (1): 295-310. 2019.
    I would like to start by expressing my gratitude to Chenyang Li for proposing, organizing, and arranging the publication of this symposium discussion of my book, Why Be Moral? Learning from the Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers. I would also like to thank Jeeloo Liu, Justin Tiwald, and Kam-por Yu for their serious engagements with my work with stimulating and inspiring comments. As they seem to me so persuasive, at the end of the day I would perhaps have to embrace a wholesale acceptance of their con…Read more
  •  11
    Book Reviews (review)
    with Eric Sean Nelson, Sky Liu, Xiaomei Yang, Canpeng Zhao, Xinyan Jiang, and Stephen J. Goldberg
    Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1): 143-165. 2003.
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    Taiwanese Confucianism: Guest Editor's Introduction
    Contemporary Chinese Thought 41 (1): 3-9. 2009.
    This collection demonstrates not only that any Confucianism is localized and historical, but also that any of these historical and localized forms of Confucianism is pregnant with ideas that have significant implications beyond its own location and time.
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    Feng Qi on Wisdom: Guest Editors' Introduction
    with Yang Guorong
    Contemporary Chinese Thought 42 (3): 3-7. 2011.
    Feng Qi explored many areas of Chinese and Western, ancient and modern philosophy, but he was always most concerned with the idea of wisdom. The selections translated here are examples of his earliest and last work on this subject.
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    Analects 13.18 continues to be the central focus of a prolonged debate among contemporary scholars in the mainland China. The newest stage of this debate is initiated by Liao Mingchun of Tsinghua University and Liang Tao of Renmin University of China, respectively, and responded to by Guo Qiyong and his students. There are three main issues involved in this new round of debate: whether the Chinese character yin in this passage means nondisclosure, as has been traditionally interpreted, or rectif…Read more
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    Jiwei Ci's Moral China in the Age of Reform is a landmark in our attempt to understand, diagnose, and provide solutions to the moral crisis in post-Mao China. It is difficult not to be deeply impressed by the perceptive observations, provocative claims, and sophisticated arguments Ci presents in this book. In my brief comment, I shall think with Ci on the relationship between the democratic and liberal components of a liberal democratic society on the one hand and that between the right and the …Read more
  •  2
    Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty (edited book)
    State University of New York Press. 2010.
    _An engagement between Confucianism and the philosophy of Richard Rorty._
  • Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty (edited book)
    State University of New York Press. 2009.
    An engagement between Confucianism and the philosophy of Richard Rorty
  • Quan Qiu Hua Shi Dai de Zong Jiao =
    Tai da Chu Ban Zhong Xin. 2011.
  •  13
    Guest Editor's Introduction
    Contemporary Chinese Thought 39 (1): 3-14. 2007.
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    The Self-Centeredness Objection to Virtue Ethics: Zhu Xi’s Neo-Confucian Response
    American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4): 651-692. 2010.
    As virtue ethics has developed into maturity, it has also met with a number of objections. This essay focuses on the self-centeredness objection: since virtue ethics recommends that we be concerned with our own virtues or virtuous characters, it is self-centered. In response, I first argue that, for Zhu Xi’s neo-Confucianism, the character that a virtuous person is concerned with consists largely in precisely those virtues that incline him or her to be concerned with the good of others. While su…Read more
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    Two Dilemmas in Virtue Ethics and How Zhu Xi’s Neo-Confucianism Avoids Them
    Journal of Philosophical Research 36 247-281. 2011.
    Virtue ethics has become an important rival to deontology and consequentialism, the two dominant moral theories in modern Western philosophy. What unites various forms of virtue ethics and distinguishes virtue ethics from its rivals is its emphasis on the primacy of virtue. In this article, I start with an explanation of the primacy of virtue in virtue ethics and two dilemmas, detected by Gary Watson, that virtue ethics faces: virtue ethics may maintain the primacy of virtue and thus leave virtu…Read more
  •  30
    Cheng Yi’s Neo-Confucian Ontological Hermeneutics of Dao
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (1): 69-92. 2000.
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    "WHY BE MORAL?" The Cheng Brothers' neo-confucian answer
    Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2): 321-353. 2008.
    In this article, I present a neo-Confucian answer, by Cheng Hao and Cheng Yi, to the question, "Why should I be moral?" I argue that this answer is better than some representative answers in the Western philosophical tradition. According to the Chengs, one should be moral because it is a joy to perform moral actions. Sometimes one finds it a pain, instead of a joy, to perform moral actions only because one lacks the necessary genuine moral knowledge—knowledge that is accessible to every common p…Read more
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    In this article, I attempt to provide a new interpretation of li in the neo-Confucian brothers Cheng Hao and Cheng Yi. I argue that the two brothers' views on li are not as radically different as many scholars have made us to believe; li in both brothers is a de-reified conception, referring not to some entity, including the entity with activity, but to activity, the life-giving activity of the ten thousand things; and this life-giving activity, in terms of its mysterious wonderfulness, is calle…Read more
  •  108
    Two Dilemmas in Virtue Ethics and How Zhu Xi’s Neo-Confucianism Avoids Them
    Journal of Philosophical Research 36 247-281. 2011.
    Virtue ethics has become an important rival to deontology and consequentialism, the two dominant moral theories in modern Western philosophy. What unites various forms of virtue ethics and distinguishes virtue ethics from its rivals is its emphasis on the primacy of virtue. In this article, I start with an explanation of the primacy of virtue in virtue ethics and two dilemmas, detected by Gary Watson, that virtue ethics faces: (1) virtue ethics may maintain the primacy of virtue and thus leave v…Read more
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    Knowing-that, Knowing-how, or Knowing-to?
    Journal of Philosophical Research 42 65-94. 2017.
    Gilbert Ryle has made the famous distinction between intellectual knowing-that and practical knowing-how. Since knowledge in Confucianism is not merely intellectual but also practical, many scholars have argued that such knowledge is knowing-how or, at least, very similar to it. In this essay, focusing on Wang Yangming’s moral knowledge, I shall argue that it is neither knowing-that nor knowing-how, but a third type of knowing, knowing-to. There is a unique feature of knowing-to that is not shar…Read more
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    Virtue Ethics and Moral Responsibility: Confucian Conceptions of Moral Praise and Blame
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4): 381-399. 2013.
    This essay discusses how Confucianism can deal with two related issues of virtue ethics and moral responsibility: praise and blame. We normally praise a person because the person has done something difficult, but a virtuous person does the virtuous things effortlessly, delightfully, and with great ease. Thus the question arises regarding whether such actions are indeed praiseworthy. We can blame a person for doing something wrong only if the person does it knowingly. However, according to virtue…Read more