•  34
    Science in the Age of Computer Simulation
    University of Chicago Press. 2010.
    Introduction -- Sanctioning models : theories and their scope -- Methodology for a virtual world -- A tale of two methods -- When theories shake hands -- Models of climate : values and uncertainties -- Reliability without truth -- Conclusion.
  •  15
    Laws and chances in statistical mechanics
    Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (4): 872-888. 2007.
  •  101
    Computer Simulations in Science
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. forthcoming.
  •  143
    Holism, entrenchment, and the future of climate model pluralism
    with Johannes Lenhard
    Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (3): 253-262. 2010.
  •  49
    The adventures of climate science in the sweet land of idle arguments
    with William Mark Goodwin
    Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 54 9-17. 2016.
  •  194
    In computer simulations of physical systems, the construction of models is guided, but not determined, by theory. At the same time simulations models are often constructed precisely because data are sparse. They are meant to replace experiments and observations as sources of data about the world; hence they cannot be evaluated simply by being compared to the world. So what can be the source of credibility for simulation models? I argue that the credibility of a simulation model comes not only fr…Read more
  •  155
    Laws, Chances, and Statistical Mechanics
    Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (4): 872. 2008.
    Statistical Mechanics (SM) involves probabilities. At the same time, most approaches to the foundations of SM—programs whose goal is to understand the macroscopic laws of thermal physics from the point of view of microphysics—are classical; they begin with the assumption that the underlying dynamical laws that govern the microscopic furniture of the world are (or can without loss of generality be treated as) deterministic. This raises some potential puzzles about the proper interpretation of the…Read more
  •  114
    A tale of two methods
    Synthese 169 (3). 2009.
    Simulations (both digital and analog) and experiments share many features. But what essential features distinguish them? I discuss two proposals in the literature. On one proposal, experiments investigate nature directly, while simulations merely investigate models. On another proposal, simulations differ from experiments in that simulationists manipulate objects that bear only a formal (rather than material) similarity to the targets of their investigations. Both of these proposals are rejected…Read more
  •  405
    Simulations, models, and theories: Complex physical systems and their representations
    Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3). 2001.
    Using an example of a computer simulation of the convective structure of a red giant star, this paper argues that simulation is a rich inferential process, and not simply a "number crunching" technique. The scientific practice of simulation, moreover, poses some interesting and challenging epistemological and methodological issues for the philosophy of science. I will also argue that these challenges would be best addressed by a philosophy of science that places less emphasis on the representati…Read more
  •  112
    Laws and statistical mechanics
    Philosophy of Science 71 (5): 707-718. 2004.
    This paper explores some connections between competing conceptions of scientific laws on the one hand, and a problem in the foundations of statistical mechanics on the other. I examine two proposals for understanding the time asymmetry of thermodynamic phenomenal: David Albert's recent proposal and a proposal that I outline based on Hans Reichenbach's “branch systems”. I sketch an argument against the former, and mount a defense of the latter by showing how to accommodate statistical mechanics t…Read more
  •  91
    Holism and Entrenchment in Climate Model Validation
    with Johannes Lenhard
    In M. Carrier & A. Nordmann (eds.), Science in the Context of Application, Springer. pp. 115--130. 2011.
  • Time's Arrows and the Probability Structure of the World (edited book)
    with Barry Loewer and Brad Weslake
    Harvard University Press. forthcoming.
    A collection of newly commissioned papers on themes from David Albert's Time and Chance (HUP, 2000), with replies by Albert. Confirmed contributors: Sean Carroll, Sidney Felder, Alison Fernandes, Mathias Frisch, Nick Huggett, Jenann Ismael, Doug Kutach, Barry Loewer, Tim Maudlin, Chris Meacham, David Wallace, and Eric Winsberg.
  •  19
    The hierarchy of models in simulation
    In L. Magnani, N. J. Nersessian & P. Thagard (eds.), Model-Based Reasoning in Scientific Discovery, Kluwer/plenum. pp. 255--269. 1999.
  •  94
    Quantum Life: Interaction, Entanglement, and Separation
    Journal of Philosophy 100 (2). 2003.
    Violations of the Bell inequalities in EPR-Bohm type experiments have set the literature on the metaphysics of microscopic systems to flirting with some sort of metaphysical holism regarding spatially separated, entangled systems. The rationale for this behavior comes in two parts. The first part relies on the proof, due to Jon Jarrett [2] that the experimentally observed violations of the Bell inequalities entail violations of the conjunction of two probabilistic constraints. Jarrett called the…Read more
  •  34
    Introduction to the Special Issue on Philosophy and Climate Science
    Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 46 (2): 337-338. 2015.
  •  79
    In his recent book, Time and Chance, David Albert claims that by positing that there is a uniform probability distribution defined, on the standard measure, over the space of microscopic states that are compatible with both the current macrocondition of the world, and with what he calls the “past hypothesis”, we can explain the time asymmetry of all of the thermodynamic behavior in the world. The principal purpose of this paper is to dispute this claim. I argue that Albert's proposal fails in hi…Read more
  •  25
    Using an example of a computer simulation of the convective structure of a red giant star, this paper argues that simulation is a rich inferential process, and not simply a "number crunching" technique. The scientific practice of simulation, moreover, poses some interesting and challenging epistemological and methodological issues for the philosophy of science. I will also argue that these challenges would be best addressed by a philosophy of science that places less emphasis on the representati…Read more