• This paper examines Plato’s views about the unity of argument and drama, and asks why Plato never made his views on this unity fully explicit. Taking the Gorgias as a case study it is argued that unity rests on the conception of refutative dialectic as justice and on the principle of self-consistency of thought and desire. As compared to the treatise, the dialogue form has the advantage of being able to defend these substantive views in action and thus to demonstrate the performative contradicti…Read more
  •  14
    This paper examines Plato’s views about the unity of argument and drama, and asks why Plato never made his views on this unity fully explicit. Taking the Gorgias as a case study it is argued that unity rests on the conception of refutative dialectic as justice and on the principle of self-consistency of thought and desire. As compared to the treatise, the dialogue form has the advantage of being able to defend these substantive views in action and thus to demonstrate the performative contradicti…Read more
  •  327
    31 chapters covering the Old Academy to Late Antiquity. See attached TOC
  •  26
    Host manipulation by cancer cells: Expectations, facts, and therapeutic implications
    with Tazzio Tissot, Audrey Arnal, Camille Jacqueline, Robert Poulin, Thierry Lefèvre, Frédéric Mery, Benjamin Roche, François Massol, Michel Salzet, Paul Ewald, Aurélie Tasiemski, Beata Ujvari, and Frédéric Thomas
    Bioessays 38 (3): 276-285. 2016.
    Similar to parasites, cancer cells depend on their hosts for sustenance, proliferation and reproduction, exploiting the hosts for energy and resources, and thereby impairing their health and fitness. Because of this lifestyle similarity, it is predicted that cancer cells could, like numerous parasitic organisms, evolve the capacity to manipulate the phenotype of their hosts to increase their own fitness. We claim that the extent of this phenomenon and its therapeutic implications are, however, u…Read more
  •  9
    Cancer adaptations: Atavism, de novo selection, or something in between?
    with Frédéric Thomas, Beata Ujvari, and Mark Vincent
    Bioessays 39 (8): 1700039. 2017.
  •  1
    The Platonic Alcibiades I: The Dialogue and its Ancient Reception
    with Harold Tarrant
    Cambridge University Press. 2015.
    Although it was influential for several hundred years after it first appeared, doubts about the authenticity of the Platonic Alcibiades I have unnecessarily impeded its interpretation ever since. It positions itself firmly within the Platonic and Socratic traditions, and should therefore be approached in the same way as most other Platonic dialogues. It paints a vivid portrait of a Socrates in his late thirties tackling the unrealistic ambitions of the youthful Alcibiades, urging him to come to …Read more
  •  5
    Chapter 8. The Elenctic Strategies of Socrates: The Alcibiades I and the Commentary of Olympiodorus
    In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates, University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 118-126. 2014.
  •  5
    Tradition et critique : lecture jumelée de Platon et Aristote chez Olympiodore
    Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (1): 89-104. 2008.
    Résumé Quel type d’autorité revêtent Platon et Aristote à la fin de l’Antiquité, en particulier aux yeux d’Olympiodore d’Alexandrie? Selon une thèse dominante de nos jours, le rapport aux deux classiques grecs, chez tous les néoplatoniciens, se résume à deux présupposés : l’harmonie entre les deux penseurs et la supériorité, plus précisément l’infaillibilité de Platon. La présente étude se propose, dans un premier temps, d’éclairer la notion d’harmonie à la lumière du contexte pédagogique des co…Read more
  •  6
    Zwischen Dialektik und Rhetorik. Neuere Forschungen zu Platons Gorgias (review)
    Philosophische Rundschau 55 (1): 66. 2018.
  •  8
    Il Platone socratico di Gadamer
    Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 63 (4). 2008.
  •  19
    Liminaire
    with Martin Achard
    Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (3): 581-582. 2008.
  •  15
    La connaissance de soi dans l’Alcibiade majeur et le commentaire d’Olympiodore
    Laval Théologique et Philosophique 65 (2): 363-378. 2009.
    L’authenticité de l’Alcibiade majeur est depuis le xixe siècle souvent remise en cause; on y voit notamment un mélange incongru de socratisme et de platonisme. Inséparable du débat sur l’authenticité du dialogue, l’étude du passage clé sur la connaissance de soi est confrontée à deux interprétations opposées, habituellement estimées irréconciliables, soit les lectures théocentrique et anthropocentrique. Le commentaire d’Olympiodore a le mérite d’unir habilement, à la lumière du contexte dramatiq…Read more
  •  10
    Some legal theorists deny that states can conceivably act extralegally in the sense of acting contrary to domestic law. This position finds its most robust articulation in the writings of Hans Kelsen and has more recently been taken up by David Dyzenhaus in the context of his work on emergencies and legality. This paper seeks to demystify their arguments and ultimately contend that we can intelligibly speak of the state as a legal wrongdoer or a legally unauthorized actor.
  •  79
    Criminalizing the State
    Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2): 255-284. 2013.
    In this article, I ask whether the state, as opposed to its individual members, can intelligibly and legitimately be criminalized, with a focus on the possibility of its domestic criminalization. I proceed by identifying what I take to be the core objections to such criminalization, and then investigate ways in which they can be challenged. First, I address the claim that the state is not a kind of entity that can intelligibly perpetrate domestic criminal wrongs. I argue against it by building u…Read more
  •  740
    Making Sense of 'Public' Emergencies
    Philosophy of Management (formerly Reason in Practice) 8 (2): 31-53. 2009.
    In this article, I seek to make sense of the oft-invoked idea of 'public emergency' and of some of its (supposedly) radical moral implications. I challenge controversial claims by Tom Sorell, Michael Walzer, and Giorgio Agamben, and argue for a more discriminating understanding of the category and its moral force.
  •  39
    Some legal theorists deny that states can conceivably act extra-legally, in the sense of acting contrary to domestic law. This position finds its most robust articulation in the writings of Hans Kelsen, and has more recently been taken up by David Dyzenhaus in the context of his work on emergencies and legality. This paper seeks to demystify their arguments and, ultimately, contend that we can intelligibly speak of the state as a legal wrongdoer or a legally unauthorized actor.
  •  8
    Making Sense of ‘Public’ Emergencies
    Philosophy of Management 8 (2): 31-53. 2009.
    In this article, I seek to make sense of the oft-invoked idea of ‘public emergency’ and of some of its radical moral implications. I challenge controversial claims by Tom Sorell, Michael Walzer, and Giorgio Agamben, and argue for a more discriminating understanding of the category and its moral force.
  •  95
    This is a review essay of Gardner, John. 2007, Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 288 pp.
  •  41
    Puzzling about State Excuses as an Instance of Group Excuses
    In R. A. Duff, L. Farmer, S. Marshall & V. Tadros (eds.), The Constitution of the Criminal Law, Oxford University Press. forthcoming.
    Can the state, as opposed to its individual human members in their personal capacity, intelligibly seek to avoid blame for unjustified wrongdoing by invoking excuses (as opposed to justifications)? Insofar as it can, should such claims ever be given moral and legal recognition? While a number of theorists have denied it in passing, the question remains radically underexplored. In this article (in its penultimate draft version), I seek to identify the main metaphysical and moral objections to st…Read more
  •  21
    In the last two decades, the philosophy of criminal law has undergone a vibrant revival in Canada. The adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms has given the Supreme Court of Canada unprecedented latitude to engage with principles of legal, moral, and political philosophy when elaborating its criminal law jurisprudence. Canadian scholars have followed suit by paying increased attention to the philosophical foundations of domestic criminal law. Because of Canada's leadership in internationa…Read more