•  31
    Wittgenstein on 'I' and the self
    In Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), A Companion to Wittgenstein, . 2017.
    Consensus identifies an underlying continuity to Wittgenstein's treatment of the self and 'I', despite certain obvious surface variations and revisions. Almost all Wittgenstein's arguments and observations concerning 'I' and the self in the Tractatus are arranged as attempts to explicate. The philosophical self is not the human being, not the human body, or the human soul, with which psychology deals, but rather the metaphysical subject, the limit of the world, not a part of it. The picture that…Read more
  •  12
    Scepticism in the sonnets
    In Craig Bourne & Emily Caddick Bourne (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Shakespeare and Philosophy, . 2018.
  • Hilary Putnam
    Routledge. 2006.
    Putnam is one of the most influential philosophers of recent times, and his authority stretches far beyond the confines of the discipline. However, there is a considerable challenge in presenting his work both accurately and accessibly. This is due to the width and diversity of his published writings and to his frequent spells of radical re-thinking. But if we are to understand how and why philosophy is developing as it is, we need to attend to Putnam's whole career. He has had a dramatic influe…Read more
  •  11
    Hilary Putnam
    Routledge. 2006.
    Putnam is one of the most influential philosophers of recent times, and his authority stretches far beyond the confines of the discipline. However, there is a considerable challenge in presenting his work both accurately and accessibly. This is due to the width and diversity of his published writings and to his frequent spells of radical re-thinking. But if we are to understand how and why philosophy is developing as it is, we need to attend to Putnam's whole career. He has had a dramatic influe…Read more
  •  28
    John Mcdowell
    Polity. 2004.
    John McDowell has set the philosophical world alight with a revolutionary approach to the subject, illuminating old problems with dazzling particularity. In this welcome introduction to his work, Maximilian de Gaynesford puts writing within comfortable reach of non-specialists. The guiding argument of the book is that the variety of McDowell's interests disguises a core concern with a single basic goal: 'giving philosophy peace'. Since the dawn of the subject, philosophy has struggled with the q…Read more
  •  35
    Agents and Their Actions (edited book)
    Wiley-Blackwell. 2011.
    Reflecting a recent flourishing of creative thinking in the field, _Agents and Their Actions_ presents seven newly commissioned essays by leading international philosophers that highlight the most recent debates in the philosophy of action Features seven internationally significant authors, including new work by two of philosophy's ‘super stars’, John McDowell and Joseph Raz Presents the first clear indication of how John McDowell is extending his path-breaking work on intentionality and percept…Read more
  • Kant and Strawson on the First Person
    In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant, Clarendon Press. 2003.
  • Contempt and Integrity
    In Nafsika Athanassoulis & Samantha Vice (eds.), The Moral Life: Essays in Honour of John Cottingham, Palgrave-macmillan. 2008.
  •  24
    Ethics at the Cinema
    Philosophical Papers 42 (3). 2013.
    No abstract
  •  22
    Speech acts and poetry
    Analysis 70 (4). 2010.
  •  139
    Claudia Bianchi defends what she calls ‘MacKinnon's claim’: that ‘works of pornography can be understood as illocutionary acts of subordinating women, or illocutionary acts of silencing women’ in response to Saul , and by appeal to the formulations of Langton , Hornsby and Hornsby and Langton . I think Bianchi has two different claims in mind , and that it is important to distinguish the two, since the argument offered for either claim frustrates the aim sought by the other.Bianchi expresses the…Read more
  •  44
    I is perhaps the most important and the least understood of our everyday expressions. This is a constant source of philosophical confusion. Max de Gaynesford offers a remedy: he explains what this expression means. He thereby shows the way to an understanding of how we express first-personal thinking. The book thus not only resolves a key issue in philosophy of language, but promises to be of great use to people working on problems in other areas of philosophy.
  •  6
    How Wrong Can One Be?
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96. 1996.
  •  46
    On Referring to Oneself
    Theoria 70 (2-3): 121-161. 2004.
  •  39
    Spinning threads: On Peacocke's moderate rationalism
    Philosophical Books 47 (2): 111-119. 2006.
  •  52
    What are we? A study in personal ontology – Eric T. Olson
    Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238): 208-211. 2010.
    No Abstract
  •  101
    Self-knowing agents • by Lucy O'Brien
    Analysis 69 (1): 187-188. 2009.
    How is it that we think and refer in the first-person way? For most philosophers in the analytic tradition, the problem is essentially this: how two apparently conflicting kinds of properties can be reconciled and united as properties of the same entity. What is special about the first person has to be reconciled with what is ordinary about it . The range of responses reduces to four basic options. The orthodox view is optimistic: there really is a way of reconciling these apparently contradicto…Read more
  • Being at home : human beings and human bodies
    In Brian Leiter & Michael Rosen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Continental Philosophy, Oxford University Press. 2007.
  •  32
    Thucydides of the cool hour
    Ratio 21 (3): 360-367. 2008.
    No Abstract
  •  16
    How Wrong Can One Be?
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96 (1): 387-394. 1996.
  • Using Sartre (review)
    Radical Philosophy 73. 1995.