•  110
    Imagination
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2019.
    To imagine is to form a mental representation that does not aim at things as they actually, presently, and subjectively are. One can use imagination to represent possibilities other than the actual, to represent times other than the present, and to represent perspectives other than one’s own. Unlike perceiving and believing, imagining something does not require one to consider that something to be the case. Unlike desiring or anticipating, imagining something does not require one to wish or expe…Read more
  •  92
    Introduction: Perceptual experience
    In John Hawthorne & Tamar Szabó Gendler (eds.), Perceptual Experience, Oxford University Press. pp. 1--30. 2006.
    Much contemporary discussion of perceptual experience can be traced to two observations. The first is that perception seems to put us in direct contact with the world around us: when perception is successful, we come to recognize— immediately—that certain objects have certain properties. The second is that perceptual experience may fail to provide such knowledge: when we fall prey to illusion or hallucination, the way things appear may differ radically from the way things actually are. For much …Read more
  •  83
  •  75
    Critical Study of Carol Rovane’s The Bounds of Agency (review)
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1). 2002.
    “Like much recent work on personal identity,” Carol Rovane writes in the opening sentence of The Bounds of Agency: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics, “this effort takes its main cue from Locke”. The work also—as its title suggests—takes inspiration from Strawsonian neo-Kantianism. And although direct allusion to his writings is limited to a few passing references, Rovane’s essay is largely Davidsonian in spirit. Indeed, it would not be an exaggeration to say that The Bounds of Agency answers a…Read more
  •  67
    On the possibility of feminist epistemology
    Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2): 104-117. 1996.
  •  67
    The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance
    Journal of Philosophy 97 (2): 55. 2000.
  •  57
    Review of Paul Harris, The Work of the Imagination (review)
    Mind 111 (442): 414-418. 2002.
    I had a structural worry about the relation of Gaita’s three chapters on truth, interesting though these chapters are, to the rest of Gaita’s project. And I had some residual questions left after reading the book: What are persons? How do we know when we are encountering one, and when are we justified (we must be sometimes: compare the various sorts of animal) in a decision that something we encounter is not a person? Do evil actions always involve a sort of blindness to what is being done? If s…Read more
  •  47
    Discussion. Continence on the cheap
    Mind 107 (428): 821-821. 1998.
  •  44
    The Human Animal
    Philosophical Review 108 (1): 112. 1999.
    The Human Animal is an extended defense of what its author calls the Biological Approach to personal identity: that you and I are human animals, and that the identity conditions under which we endure are those which apply to us as biological organisms. The somewhat surprising corollary of this view is that no sort of psychological continuity is either necessary or sufficient for a human animal—and thus for us—to persist through time. In challenging the hegemony of Psychological Approaches to per…Read more
  •  34
    Tools of the Trade
    The Harvard Review of Philosophy 4 (1): 81-85. 1994.
  •  29
    Review of David Schmidtz, ed. Robert Nozick (review)
    Philosophical Review 112 (1): 106-110. 2003.
    David Schmidtz’s Robert Nozick is a collection of nine specially commissioned papers on Nozick’s work by a wide range of distinguished philosophers. Nearly all of the papers are of high quality, and the volume is well conceptualized and well executed. The collection will certainly be useful to anyone with a comprehensive interest in Nozick’s corpus. In addition, many of its individual essays will be of independent interest to those concerned with particular aspects of Nozick’s work.
  •  26
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings From Past and Present (edited book)
    Oxford University Press. 2008.
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings from Past and Present is a comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary readings across the major fields of philosophy. With depth and quality, this introductory anthology offers a selection of readings that is both extensive and expansive; the readings span twenty-five centuries. They are organized topically into five parts: Religion and Belief, Moral and Political Philosophy, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind and Language, and Life…Read more
  •  25
    Robert Nozick
    Philosophical Review 112 (1): 106-110. 2003.
  •  25
    Why language is not a “direct medium”. Commentary on Ruth Garrett Millikan
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1): 71-72. 1998.
    Millikan contrasts her substance-based view of concepts with “descriptionism” according to which description determines what falls under a concept. Focusing on her discussion of the role of language in the acquisition of concepts, I argue that descriptions cannot be separated from perception in the ways Millikan's view requires.
  •  24
    Review of Eric Olson: The Human Animal (review)
    Philosophical Review 108 (1): 112-115. 1999.
    The Human Animal is an extended defense of what its author calls the Biological Approach to personal identity: that you and I are human animals, and that the identity conditions under which we endure are those which apply to us as biological organisms. The somewhat surprising corollary of this view is that no sort of psychological continuity is either necessary or sufficient for a human animal—and thus for us—to persist through time. In challenging the hegemony of Psychological Approaches to per…Read more
  •  23
    Empiricism, Rationalism and the Limits of Justification
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3): 641-648. 2001.
    BonJour’s intricately argued and provocative book raises a fundamental challenge for the empiricist: if we lack the capacity for direct apprehension of necessary truths, how do we know so much? How do we know about logic and mathematics and other apparently a priori subjects? How do we know about generalities, about the past and the future, about objects that are not present? How do we know about the relations that hold between premises and conclusions? If the first half of BonJour’s book is rig…Read more
  •  17
    Exceptional Persons
    In Jonathan Shear & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Models of the Self, Imprint Academic. 1999.
  •  15
    Personal Identity and Thought-Experiments
    Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206): 34-54. 2002.
  •  13
    Philosophical Thought Experiments, Intuitions, and Cognitive Equilibrium
    Midwest Studies in Philosophy 31 (1): 68-89. 2007.
  •  8
    Critical Study of Carol Rovane’s The Bounds of Agency
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1): 229-240. 2002.
    “Like much recent work on personal identity,” Carol Rovane writes in the opening sentence of The Bounds of Agency: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics, “this effort takes its main cue from Locke”. The work also—as its title suggests—takes inspiration from Strawsonian neo-Kantianism. And although direct allusion to his writings is limited to a few passing references, Rovane’s essay is largely Davidsonian in spirit. Indeed, it would not be an exaggeration to say that The Bounds of Agency answers a…Read more
  •  7
    Oxford Studies in Epistemology: Volume 4 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press UK. 2013.
    Oxford Studies in Epistemology is a biennial publicaton which offers a regular snapshot of state-of-the-art work in this important field. Under the guidance of a distinguished editorial board composed of leading philosophers in North America, Europe and Australasia, it publishes exemplary papers in epistemology, broadly construed.
  •  7
    Imaginative Resistance
    In Stephen Davies, Kathleen Marie Higgins, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker, David Cooper & E. (eds.), A Companion to Aesthetics: Second Edition, Blackwell. 2009.
  •  6
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings From Past and Present (edited book)
    Oxford University Press USA. 2007.
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings from Past and Present offers an extensive collection of classic and contemporary readings, organized topically into five main sections: Religion and Belief, Moral and Political Philosophy, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind and Language, and Life and Death. Within these broad areas, readings are arranged in clusters that address both traditional issues--such as the existence of God, justice and the state, knowledge and skepticism, and free will-…Read more
  •  3
    Oxford Studies in Epistemology: Volume 3 (edited book)
    Oxford University Press UK. 2007.
    Oxford Studies in Epistemology is a biennial publicaton which offers a regular snapshot of state-of-the-art work in this important field. Under the guidance of a distinguished editorial board composed of leading philosophers in North America, Europe and Australasia, it will publish exemplary papers in epistemology, broadly construed. Topics within its purview include: *traditional epistemological questions concerning the nature of belief, justification, and knowledge, the status of scepticism, t…Read more
  •  3
    This book offers a novel analysis of the widely-used but ill-understood technique of thought experiment. The author argues that the powers and limits of this methodology can be traced to the fact that when the contemplation of an imaginary scenario brings us to new knowledge, it does so by forcing us to make sense of exceptional cases
  •  2
    Personal Identity and Metaphysics
    In Brian McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind, Oxford University Press. 2009.
  •  1
    Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology
    Oxford University Press UK. 2010.
    Tamar Gendler draws together in this book a series of essays in which she investigates philosophical methodology, which is now emerging as a central topic of philosophical discussions. Three intertwined themes run through the volume: imagination, intuition and philosophical methodology. Each of the chapters focuses, in one way or another, on how we engage with subject matter that we take to be imaginary--and they explore the implications of this for how thought experiments and appeals to intuiti…Read more
  •  1
    Thought experiment is one of the most widely-used and least understood techniques in philosophy. A thought experiment is a process of reasoning carried out within the context of a well-articulated imaginary scenario in order to answer a specific question about a non-imaginary situation. The aim of my dissertation is to show that both the powers and the limits of this methodology can be traced to the fact that when the contemplation of an imaginary scenario brings us to new knowledge, it does so …Read more