•  383
    Against Musical Ontology
    Journal of Philosophy 100 (4). 2003.
  •  220
    Musical sympathies: The experience of expressive music
    Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1): 49-57. 1995.
  •  154
    Musical Ontology, Musical Reasons
    The Monist 95 (4): 663-683. 2012.
  •  101
    Nietzsche and the Re-Evaluation of Values
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (2). 2005.
    This paper offers an account of Nietzsche's re-evaluation of values that seeks to satisfy two desiderata, both important if Nietzsche's project is to stand a chance of success. The first is that Nietzsche's re-evaluations must be capable of being understood as authoritative by those whose values are subject to re-evaluation. The second is that Nietzsche's project must not falsify the values being re-evaluated, by, for example, misrepresenting intrinsic values as instrumental values. Given this, …Read more
  •  96
    Emotion and Feeling
    with Geoffrey C. Madell
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes( 71 (71): 147-176. 1997.
  •  94
    Arguing About Art: Contemporary Philosophical Debates (edited book)
    with Alex Neill
    Routledge. 2001.
    Offering a unique 'debate' format, the third edition of_ _the bestselling_ Arguing About Art_ is ideal for newcomers to aesthetics or philosophy of art. This lively collection presents an extensive range of short, clear introductions to each of the discussions which include: sentimentality appreciation interpretation understanding objectivity nature food horror. With revised introductions, updated suggestions for further reading and new sections on pornography and societies without art, _Arguing…Read more
  •  83
  •  70
    Nietzsche's Conscience
    Journal of Nietzsche Studies 11 1-12. 1996.
  •  70
  •  66
    Nietzsche on art and freedom
    European Journal of Philosophy 15 (2). 2007.
    There are passages in Nietzsche that can be read as contributions to the free will/determinism debate. When read in that way, they reveal a fairly amateurish metaphysician with little of real substance or novelty to contribute; and if these readings were apt or perspicuous, it seems to me, they would show that Nietzsche's thoughts about freedom were barely worth pausing over. They would simply confirm the impression—amply bolstered from other quarters—that Nietzsche was not at his best when addr…Read more
  •  61
  •  60
    Not ideal: Collingwood's expression theory
    Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3): 263-272. 1997.
  •  59
    Aaron Ridley explores Nietzsche's mature ethical thought as expressed in his masterpiece On the Genealogy of Morals. Taking seriously the use that Nietzsche makes of human types, Ridley arranges his book thematically around the six characters who loom largest in that work—the slave, the priest, the philosopher, the artist, the scientist, and the noble. By elucidating what the Genealogy says about these figures, he achieves a persuasive new assessment of Nietzsche's ethics. Ridley's intellectuall…Read more
  •  58
    The philosophy of medium-grade art
    British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (4): 413-413. 1996.
  •  58
    Ridley's book is both an introduction to philosophy of music generally and an introduction to an individual, pungently flavoured philosophy of music. His arguments are lively and provocative, and to boot, he writes like a dream. This is the kind of book that reminds one why philosophy matters, especially as applied to the things we love most.-Jerrold Levinson, professor of philosophy, University of Maryland This outstanding book provides new and distinctive approaches to the five central topics …Read more
  •  54
    On Fate
    with David Owen
    International Studies in Philosophy 35 (3): 63-78. 2003.
  •  50
    Religious Music for Godless Ears
    with A. Neill
    Mind 119 (476): 999-1023. 2010.
    The discussion in this paper sets out from two thoughts, one a straightforward empirical observation, the other a worry. The observation is that many who do not believe in God nevertheless regard certain pieces of religious music, such as Bach’s B minor Mass, as among the greatest works of art. The worry is that there must be something compromised or incomplete in the atheist’s experience of such works. Taken together, these thoughts would seem to point to the sceptical conclusion that the high …Read more
  •  49
    Bleeding chunks: Some remarks about musical understanding
    Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (4): 589-596. 1993.
  •  49
    Emotion and feeling: Aaron Ridley
    Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1). 1997.
  •  47
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Nietzsche on Art
    Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (4): 426-428. 2007.
  •  47
    Perishing of the Truth: Nietzsche's Aesthetic Prophylactics: Articles
    British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4): 427-437. 2010.
    This paper offers an interpretation of Nietzsche’s well known unpublished remark, ‘Truth is ugly. We possess art lest we perish of the truth.’ I argue that it is not helpful to construe this remark as a claim to the effect that art falsifies the truth by, for example, peddling lies or deceptions. Rather, I suggest, the remark should be taken to refer to the various ways in which art can present us with the truth in such a manner that we do not perish of it. And of these ways, I argue, the most i…Read more
  •  46
    Nietzsche's Greatest Weight
    Journal of Nietzsche Studies 14 19-25. 1997.
  •  45
    Tragedy and the Tender-Hearted
    Philosophy and Literature 17 (2): 234-245. 1993.
  •  45
    Vi *-Nietzsche and the re-evaluation of values
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1): 155-175. 2005.
    This paper offers an account of Nietzsche's re-evaluation of values that seeks to satisfy two desiderata, both important if Nietzsche's project is to stand a chance of success. The first is that Nietzsche's re-evaluations must be capable of being understood as authoritative by those whose values are subject to re-evaluation. The second is that Nietzsche's project must not falsify the values being re-evaluated, by, for example, misrepresenting intrinsic values as instrumental values. Given this, …Read more
  •  45
    Why ethics and aesthetics are practically the same
    Philosophical Quarterly. forthcoming.
    Discussion of the relations between ethics and aesthetics has tended to focus on issues concerning judgement: for example, philosophers have often asked whether, or to what extent, ethical considerations of one sort or another should inform aesthetic verdicts. Much less discussed, however, have been the relations between these two domains in their practical aspects. In this paper, I try to defuse a cluster of reasons for believing that practical competence in the ethical domain and practical com…Read more
  •  44
    Relational Theories of Art: the History of an Error
    with A. Neill
    British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2): 141-151. 2012.
    Relational theories of art—paradigmatically, the ‘Institutional’ theory—arose from dissatisfaction with the Wittgenstein-inspired ‘family resemblance’ account of art, and were taken not merely to be preferable in various ways to that account, but actually to falsify it. We argue that this latter thought is rooted in a fundamental misunderstanding of the falsification-conditions of a family resemblance account; and we suggest that, once the reasons for this are appreciated, any apparent motivatio…Read more
  •  41