•  3
    Triggers of Thought: Impressions within Hume’s Theory of Mind
    History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 13 (1): 105-121. 2010.
    This essay argues that Humean impressions are triggers of associative processes, which enable us to form stable patterns of thought that co-vary with our experiences of the world. It will thus challenge the importance of the Copy Principle by claiming that it is the regularity with which certain kinds of sensory inputs motivate certain sets of complex ideas that matters for the discrimination of ideas. This reading is conducive to Hume’s account of perception, because it avoids the impoverishmen…Read more
  •  17
    Justice Through a Multispecies Lens
    with Danielle Celermajer, Sria Chatterjee, Alasdair Cochrane, Stefanie Fishel, Astrida Neimanis, Anne O’Brien, Susan Reid, Krithika Srinivasan, and David Schlosberg
    Contemporary Political Theory 19 (3): 475-512. 2020.
  • By investigating conceptions of experience from Descartes to Kant, this book shows that one of the central questions of the early-modern period was how humans can instantiate in their actions the principles of rational moral agency, while at the same time responding with their bodies to the causal play of nature. Through the analysis of this question, the book draws attention to the bodily underpinnings of the ability to experience thoughts and feelings. It thus challenges overly subjectivist in…Read more
  •  10
    Descartes, Malebranche, and the Crisis of Perception, by OttWalter. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 272.
  •  18
    The language of sympathy: Hume on communication
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2): 296-317. 2020.
    By placing Hume’s account of communication in the context of some less known seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French resources on rhetoric and language, this essay argues that Hume based his und...
  •  2
    Empathy--our capacity to cognitively or affectively connect with other people's thoughts and feelings--is a concept whose definition and meaning varies widely within philosophy and other disciplines. Philosophical Perspectives on Empathy advances research on the nature and function of empathy by exploring and challenging different theoretical approaches to this phenomenon. The first section of the book explores empathy as a historiographical method, presenting a number of rich and interesting ar…Read more
  •  25
    Herder: Philosophy and Anthropology (edited book)
    with DeSouza Nigel
    Oxford University Press. 2017.
    Thirteen scholars offer new essays exploring the question at the heart of J. G. Herder's thought: How can philosophy enable an understanding of the human being not simply as an intellectual and moral agent, but also as a creature of nature who is fundamentally marked by an affective openness and responsiveness to the world and other persons?
  •  1
    The Self
    In Cecilia Wee & Jorge Secada (eds.), The Cartesian Mind, Routledge. forthcoming.
  • Personal Identity
    In Dana Jalobeanu & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.), Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences, Springer. forthcoming.
  • Hume and German Philosophy
    In Angela Coventry & Alex Sagar (eds.), The Humean Mind, Routledge. forthcoming.
  •  2
    Descartes on Self-Knowledge
    In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Knowledge: From Antiquity to the Present, Bloomsbury. forthcoming.
  •  3
    Introduction
    In Nigel DeSouza & Anik Waldow (eds.), Herder: Philosophy and Anthropology, Oxford University Press. pp. 1-9. 2017.
    Herder brings the entire human being into focus by tracing its connections with the natural, cultural, and historical world. The first part of the volume examines the various dimensions of Herder’s philosophical understanding of human nature through which he sought methodologically to delineate a genuinely anthropological philosophy. This includes his critique of traditional metaphysics and its revision along anthropological lines; the metaphysical, epistemological, and physiological dimensions …Read more
  •  3
    This essay argues that Herder’s conception of history as a form of natural growth is grounded in his claim that humans are a part of nature and develop historically situated forms of reason in communication with the features of their natural and social environments. By stressing this developmental aspect of human reason, Herder not only helps us to correct an overly universalistic conception of reason that ignores the importance of situational contexts in the shaping of cognitive structures; he …Read more
  •  4
    n his 1785 review of Herder’s Ideen zur Geschichte der Menschheit Kant stresses the negative effects of sensibility and imagination in undermining philosophy. This essay will offer a defence of Herder against Kant in order to gesture towards a more positive account of the cognitive function of these capacities. I will argue that the eighteenth-century fascination with the experimental sciences and the demand to engage in anti-speculative philosophy in fact called for the integration of sensibili…Read more
  •  3
    Nature and Norms in Thought
    In Anik Waldow & Martin Lenz (eds.), Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy, Springer. pp. 1-12. 2013.
    The present volume joins contributions to early modern debates on nature and norms in thought with decidedly contemporary perspectives, thereby hoping to shed new light on developments in early modern philosophy as well as enrich current discussions on the relation between nature and norms. Clearly, the relation between mind and world poses perennial problems and debates. How do we explain that thoughts and other mental states have content? What makes it the case that some thought is about this …Read more
  •  9
    Natural History and the Formation of the Human Being: Kant on Active Forces
    Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 58 67-76. 2016.
    In his 1785-review of the Ideen zur Philosophie der Geschichte der Menschheit, Kant objects to Herder's conception of nature as being imbued with active forces. This attack is usually evaluated against the background of Kant's critical project and his epistemological concern to caution against the “metaphysical excess” of attributing immanent properties to matter. In this paper I explore a slightly different reading by investigating Kant's pre-critical account of creation and generation. The aim…Read more
  •  1
    Bridging the Gap: Can Conceptual Analysis solve the Problem of Other Minds
    Anthropology and Philosophy 11 133-147. 2014.
  • Who is able to feel Pain? A Cartesian Attack on the Bête Machine
    In Angela Tumini & Hans Sternudd (eds.), How does it Feel?, Interdisciplinary Press. pp. 3-15. 2011.
  •  8
    Mechanism and Thought Formation: Hume’s Emancipatory Scepticism
    In Stephen Buckle & Craig Taylor (eds.), Hume and the Enlightenment, Pickering & Chatto Publishing. pp. 171-186. 2011.
  •  33
    This monograph is an important book for anyone interested in the topic of consciousness and personal identity in early modern thought. It offers a rich overview of the vast array of writers reflecting on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century conceptions of persons, their responsibilities, the issue of immortality, and the development of an account of consciousness based on the way in which minds relate to their own thoughts and feelings. It traces the lines of influence from the scholastic backgro…Read more
  •  32
    Activating the Mind: Descartes' Dreams and the Awakening of the Human Animal Machine
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 94 (2): 299-325. 2017.
    In this essay I argue that one of the things that matters most to Descartes' account of mind is that we use our minds actively. This is because for him only an active mind is able to re-organize its passionate experiences in such a way that a genuinely human, self-governed life of virtue and true contentment becomes possible. To bring out this connection, I will read the Meditations against the backdrop of Descartes' correspondence with Elisabeth. This will reveal that in Descartes' writings the…Read more
  •  10
    _Sensibility in the Early Modern Era_ investigates how the early modern characterisation of sensibility as a natural property of the body could give way to complex considerations about the importance of affect in morality. What underlies this understanding of sensibility is the attempt to fuse Lockean sensationism with Scottish sentimentalism – being able to have experiences of objects in the world is here seen as being grounded in the same principle that also enables us to feel moral sentiments…Read more
  • Triggers of Thought: Impressions within Hume’s Theory of Mind
    History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 13. 2010.
    This essay argues that Humean impressions are triggers of associative processes, which enable us to form stable patterns of thought that co-vary with our experiences of the world. It will thus challenge the importance of the Copy Principle by claiming that it is the regularity with which certain kinds of sensory inputs motivate certain sets of complex ideas that matters for the discrimination of ideas. This reading is conducive to Hume’s account of perception, because it avoids the impoverishmen…Read more
  •  26
    Sympathy and the Mechanics of Character Change
    Hume Studies 38 (2): 221-242. 2012.
    Hume holds that sympathy is both crucial for making moral judgments and a distorting influence that prevents us from assessing the virtue of characters impartially. He writes, When any quality, or character, has a tendency to the good of mankind, we are pleas’d with it, and approve of it; because it presents the lively idea of pleasure; which idea affects us by sympathy, and is itself a kind of pleasure. But as this sympathy is very variable, it may be thought, that our sentiments of morals must…Read more
  •  28
    The Artifice of Human Nature: Rousseau and Herder
    Intellectual History Review 25 (3): 343-356. 2015.
    In this essay I will argue that although Rousseau often invokes the concept of nature as a fixed point of reference in the evaluation of personal traits, and individual and collective practices, a closer look at the dynamics of the educational programme laid out in his Emile shows that for him human nature has to emerge in a process that combines the influence of nature and artifice. This process is essentially enabled by Emile's sensibility that, as I will claim, can be conceived as a natural p…Read more