•  19
    After preliminaries concerning different accounts of the good and the distinction between actual-consequence consequentialism and expected-value consequentialism, this paper explains why consequentialists should prescribe a moral decision procedure dominated by rules. But act-consequentialists deny rules have a role in the criterion of moral rightness. Prescribing a decision procedure dominated by rules and then denying rules a role in the criterion of rightness can be problematic. Rule-conseque…Read more
  •  41
    Parfit's final arguments in normative ethics
    In J. McMahan, T. Campbell, J. Goodrich & K. Ramakrishnan (eds.), Essays in honour of Derek Parfit: normative ethics and personal identity, . forthcoming.
    This paper starts by juxtaposing the normative ethics in the final part of Parfit's final book, On What Matters, vol. 3, with the normative ethics in his earlier books, Reasons and Persons and On What Matters, vol. 1. The paper then addresses three questions. The first is, where does the reflective-equilibrium methodology that Parfit endorsed in the first volume of On What Matters lead? The second is, is the Act-involving Act Consequentialism that Parfit considers in the final volume of On What …Read more
  •  110
    Singer and His Critics
    Mind 111 (441): 122-126. 2002.
  •  8
    Welfare and Rational Care
    Mind 114 (454): 409-413. 2005.
  •  16
    Morality and Action
    Philosophical Quarterly 46 (184): 382-385. 1996.
  •  165
    ‘Moral Particularism: Wrong and Bad’
    In Brad Hooker & Margaret Olivia Little (eds.), Moral Particularism, Oxford University Press. pp. 1-22. 2000.
  •  24
    Epistemic Virtues Versus Ethical Values in the Financial Services Sector
    with Emma Borg
    Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1): 17-27. 2019.
    In his important recent book, Ethics and the Global Financial Crisis: Why Incompetence is Worse than Greed, Boudewijn de Bruin argues that a key element of the global financial crisis of 2007–2008 was a failure of epistemic virtue. To improve matters, then, de Bruin argues we need to focus on the acquisition and exercise of epistemic virtues, rather than to focus on a more ethical culture for banking per se. Whilst this is an interesting suggestion and it is indeed very plausible that an increas…Read more
  •  9
    Morality, Rules, and Consequences: A Critical Reader (edited book)
    with Elinor Mason, Dale E. Miller, D. W. Haslett, Shelly Kagan, Sanford S. Levy, David Lyons, Phillip Montague, Tim Mulgan, Philip Pettit, Madison Powers, Jonathan Riley, William H. Shaw, Michael Smith, and Alan Thomas
    Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 2000.
    What determines whether an action is right or wrong? Morality, Rules, and Consequences: A Critical Reader explores for students and researchers the relationship between consequentialist theory and moral rules. Most of the chapters focus on rule consequentialism or on the distinction between act and rule versions of consequentialism. Contributors, among them the leading philosophers in the discipline, suggest ways of assessing whether rule consequentialism could be a satisfactory moral theory. Th…Read more
  •  28
    Developing Deontology: New Essays in Ethical Theory (edited book)
    Wiley-Blackwell. 2012.
    _Developing Deontology_ consists of six new essays in ethical theory by leading contemporary moral philosophers. Each essay considers concepts prominent in the development of deontological approaches to ethics, and these essays offer an invaluable contribution to that development. Essays are contributed by Michael Smith, Philip Stratton-Lake, Ralph Wedgewood, David Owens, Peter Vallentyne, and Elizabeth Harman - all leading contemporary moral philosophers Each essay offers an original and previo…Read more
  •  13
    Cudworth and Quinn
    Analysis 61 (4): 333-335. 2001.
  •  69
    Review: Welfare and Rational Care (review)
    Mind 114 (454): 409-413. 2005.
  •  42
    Sacrificing for the Good of Strangers—Repeatedly (review)
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1): 177. 1999.
  •  24
    The chapter juxtaposes the fairly quick and automatic thinking and decision making that constitutes everyday moral thought and action with the slower, more complicated, and more reflective thinking that steps beyond everyday moral thought. Various difficulties that can slow down everyday moral thought are catalogued in this paper. The paper explains how dealing with many of these difficulties leads to thinking about moral principles. And, even where there are not such difficulties, everyday mora…Read more
  •  41
    What makes a judgement a moral judgement
    Journal of Political Theory and Philosophy 1 97-112. 2017.
    What distinguishes moral judgements from judgements of other kinds? In addressing this question, this paper tries to remain as neutral as possible about which moral judgments are correct. The paper addresses objections to thinking that the defining feature of moral judgements is their other-regarding grounds, or their social function, or their motivational force, or their connection to reactive attitudes such as guilt, indignation, and resentment. The proposal this paper makes is that a judgment…Read more
  •  61
    II—Rule-Consequentialism, Incoherence, Fairness
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95 (1): 19-36. 1995.
  •  11
    Rule‐Consequentialism and Obligations Toward the Needy
    Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1): 19-33. 1998.
    Most of us believe morality requires us to help the desperately needy. But most of us also believe morality doesn't require us to make enormous sacrifices in order to help people who have no special connection with us. Such self‐sacrifice is of course praiseworthy, but it isn't morally mandatory. Rule‐consequentialism might seem to offer a plausible grounding for such beliefs. Tim Mulgan has recently argued in Analysis and Pacific Philosophical Quarterly that rule‐consequentialism cannot do so. …Read more
  •  12
    Ideal Code, Real World: A Rule-Consequentialist Theory of Morality
    Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1): 91-94. 2004.
  •  33
    Contractualism, spare wheel, aggregation
    In Matt Matravers (ed.), Scanlon and Contractualism, Frank Cass Publishers. pp. 53-76. 2003.
  •  1
    Self-interest, ethics, and the profit motive
    In Roger Crisp & Christopher Cowton (eds.), Business Ethics: Perspectives on the Practice of Theory, Oxford University Press. pp. 27--41. 1998.
  •  303
    What are the appropriate criteria for assessing a theory of morality? In this enlightening work, Brad Hooker begins by answering this question. He then argues for a rule-consequentialist theory which, in part, asserts that acts should be assessed morally in terms of impartially justified rules. In the end, he considers the implications of rule-consequentialism for several current controversies in practical ethics, making this clearly written, engaging book the best overall statement of this appr…Read more
  •  1
    US and them
    The Philosophers' Magazine 18 50-51. 2002.
  •  16
    Publicity in morality
    Ratio 23 111-117. 2010.
    Consider the idea that moral rules must be suitable for public acknowledgement and acceptance, i.e., that moral rules must be suitable for being ‘widely known and explicitly recognized’, suitable for teaching as part of moral education, suitable for guiding behaviour and reactions to behaviour, and thus suitable for justifying one’s behaviour to others. This idea is now most often associated with John Rawls, who traces it back through Kurt Baier to Kant.[1] My book developing ruleconsequentialis…Read more