•  12
    See the external link on this entry for a "widget" supplied by Bloomsbury, which will give you access to the first chapter. Today, we find ourselves surrounded by numerous reasons to despair, from loneliness, suffering and death at an individual level to societal alienation, oppression, sectarian conflict and war. No honest assessment of life can take place without facing up to these facts and it is not surprising that more and more people are beginning to suspect that the human story will end i…Read more
  • Mind the Gap
    In Richard Kearney & Brian Treanor (eds.), Carnal Hermeneutics, Fordham. pp. 57-74. 2015.
  • Introduction
    In Richard Kearney & Brian Treanor (eds.), Carnal Hermeneutics, Fordham. pp. 1-12. 2015.
  •  10
    Another World… Inside This One
    Diakrisis 1 111-130. 2018.
    Continental philosophy has long been concerned with the question of transcendence, a fact attributable in part to the historical significance of phenomenology and the legacy of debates surrounding transcendental idealism, the epoche, the status of the world and of other people, and, at least for some philosophers, the question of God. The question takes different forms in Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Levinas, Derrida, Marion, and others working in this tradition, but it remains an …Read more
  •  2
    Editor's Introduction
    Environmental Philosophy 15 (1): 1-6. 2018.
  •  2
    Interspecies Ethics (review)
    Comparative and Continental Philosophy 8 (2): 247-250. 2016.
  •  16
    Joy and the Myopia of Finitude
    Comparative and Continental Philosophy 8 (1): 6-25. 2016.
    Philosophy, by and large, tends to dwell on what might be called the woeful nature of reality—finitude, suffering, loss, death, and the like. While these topics are no doubt worthy of philosophical concern, undue focus on them tends to obscure other facets of our experience and of reality, giving philosophy a temperament that could justifiably be called melancholic. Without besmirching the value of such inquiry, this paper suggests that philosophers have largely ignored the experience of joy and…Read more
  •  7
    Vitality: Carnal, Seraphic Bodies
    Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 25 (1): 200-220. 2017.
    This paper reflects on experiences of what i call vitality. Such experiences are neither idiosyncratic nor mere romanticism. Moreover, while some figures in continental philosophy do address the body—as perceiving, as sexed, as political—there has been almost no attention given to the active body of vitality. Drawing from the work of Michel Serres, this paper will uncover some of the significant features of such bodily experiences.
  •  61
    Constellations: Gabriel Marcel’s Philosophy of Relative Otherness
    American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (3): 369-392. 2006.
    This paper examines the postmodern question of the otherness of the other from the perspective of Gabriel Marcel’s philosophy. Postmodernity—typified by philosophical movements like deconstruction—has framed the question of otherness in all-or-nothing terms; either the other is absolutely, wholly other or the other is not other at all. On the deconstructive account, the latter position amounts to a kind of “violence” against the other. Marcel’s philosophy offers an alternative to this all-or-not…Read more
  •  46
    Book reviews (review)
    with Matthew Chrisman, Mette Lebech, G. L. Huxley, and Ciaran McGlynn
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (2). 2007.
    This Article does not have an abstract
  •  8
    Narrative Environmental Virtue Ethics: Phronesis without a Phronimos
    Environmental Ethics 30 (4): 361-379. 2008.
    It is increasingly clear that virtue ethics has an important role to play in environmental ethics. However, virtue ethics—which has always been characterized by a degree of ambiguity—is faced with substantial challenges in the contemporary “postmodern” cultural milieu. Among these challenges is the lure of relativism. Most virtue ethics depend upon some view of the good life; however, today there is no unambiguous, easily agreed-upon account of the good life. Rather, we are presented with a bewi…Read more
  • Emplotting virtue: narrative and the good life
    In Brian Treanor & Henry Isaac Venema (eds.), A Passion for the Possible: Thinking with Paul Ricoeur, Fordham University Press. 2010.
  •  42
    A Passion for the Possible: Thinking with Paul Ricoeur (edited book)
    with Henry Isaac Venema
    Fordham University Press. 2010.
    The essays in this volume trace the fluid movement between phenomenological and religious descriptions of the capable self that emerges across Ricoeur's oeuvre ...
  •  1
    This dissertation opens, or perhaps re-opens, a dialogue between the work of Emmanuel Levinas and that of Gabriel Marcel. These two thinkers, each in his own way a philosopher of "the other," both provide us with descriptions of the intersubjective relationship. However, the remarkable similarity of these descriptions is matched by a frustrating incompatibility. The remarkable similarity manifests itself in the emphasis both philosophies place on the unique and in some sense inviolable position …Read more
  •  70
    Environmentalism and Public Virtue
    Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2): 9-28. 2009.
    Much of the literature addressing environmental virtue tends to focus on what might be called “personal virtue”—individual actions, characteristics, or dispositions that benefit the individual actor. There has, in contrast, been relatively little interest in either “virtue politics”—collective actions, characteristics, or dispositions—or in what might be called “public virtues,” actions, characteristics, or dispositions that benefit the community rather than the individual. This focus, however, …Read more
  •  36
    Interpreting Nature (edited book)
    with Forrest Clingerman, Martin Drenthen, and David Utsler
    Fordham University Press. 2013.
    The twentieth century saw the rise of hermeneutics, the philosophical interpretation of texts, and eventually the application of its insights to metaphorical “texts” such as individual and group identities. It also saw the rise of modern environmentalism, which evolved through various stages in which it came to realize that many of its key concerns—“wilderness” and “nature” among them—are contested territory that are viewed differently by different people. Understanding nature requires science a…Read more
  • Plus de secret: The paradox of prayer
    In Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.), The Phenomenology of Prayer, Fordham University Press. 2005.
  •  25
    God and the Other Person
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75 313-324. 2001.
    One of the most astonishing aspects of Levinas’s philosophy is the assertion that other persons are absolutely other than the self. The difficulties attending a relationship with absolute otherness are ancient, and immediately invoke Meno’s Paradox. How can we encounter that which is not already within us? The traditional reply to Meno (anamnesis) reduces other persons to the role of midwife and thereby, says Levinas, mitigates their alterity. Although Descartes seems to provide a rejoinder to a…Read more
  •  20
    Anatheism: Returning to God After God
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (5). 2011.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 5, Page 771-777, December 2011
  •  13
    The Wisdom of Frugality: Why Less is More—More or Less (review)
    Environmental Ethics 38 (3): 383-384. 2016.
  •  94
    Jill Graper Hernandez, Gabriel Marcel’s Ethic of Hope: Evil, God and Virtue
    Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (1): 143-146. 2012.
    Review of Jill Graper Hernandez, Gabriel Marcel's Ethic of Hope: Evil, God, and Virtue
  •  1
    Carnal Hermeneutics (edited book)
    with Richard Kearney
    Fordham. 2015.
  •  217
    Insufficiently radical environmentalism is inadequate to the problems that confront us; but overly radical environmentalism risks alienating people with whom, in a democracy, we must find common cause. Building on Paul Ricoeur’s work, which shows how group identity is constituted by the tension between ideology and utopia, this essay asks just how radical effective environmentalism should be. Two “case studies” of environmental agenda—that of Michael Schellenberger and Ted Nordhaus, and that of …Read more
  •  17
    God and the Other Person: Levinas’s Appropriation of Kierkegaard’s Encounter with Otherness
    Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75 313-324. 2001.
    One of the most astonishing aspects of Levinas’s philosophy is the assertion that other persons are absolutely other than the self. The difficulties attending a relationship with absolute otherness are ancient, and immediately invoke Meno’s Paradox. How can we encounter that which is not already within us? The traditional reply to Meno reduces other persons to the role of midwife and thereby, says Levinas, mitigates their alterity. Although Descartes seems to provide a rejoinder to anamnesis in …Read more
  •  36
    One of the central points of Derrida’sArchive Fever is that the nature of the “archive” affects not only what is archived, but also how we relate to and access it. The archive also conditions the process of archiving itself and, indeed, the very nature of what is archivable. Derrida's comments, however, were made in 1995, when the full extent of the Internet boom was only beginning to become evident. The intervening years have reshaped the archive in ways that Derrida could scarcely have foresee…Read more
  •  62
    Narrative Environmental Virtue Ethics
    Environmental Ethics 30 (4): 361-379. 2008.
    It is increasingly clear that virtue ethics has an important role to play in environmental ethics. However, virtue ethics—which has always been characterized by a degree of ambiguity—is faced with substantial challenges in the contemporary “postmodern” cultural milieu. Among these challenges is the lure of relativism. Most virtue ethics depend upon some view of the good life; however, today there is no unambiguous, easily agreed-upon account of the good life. Rather, we are presented with a bewi…Read more